Alaska firefighters rescue MOOSE after it fell through a window and became trapped in basement 

Firefighters in Alaska rescue a 500lb MOOSE after it fell through a window and became trapped in someone’s basement

  • Firefighters had to remove a 500-pound baby moose from a home in Soldotna – roughly 150 miles from Anchorage – on Sunday 
  • The moose had been eating vegetation near the back below-ground window when it fell into a hole and through the window 
  • Biologists partially sedated the animal and firefighters placed him on a tarp and carried him through the home and outside to safety
  • After receiving a sedative reversal and having his minor wounds tended too, the moose reportedly took off towards the woods 
  • ‘I can’t even believe it,’ firefighter Gunnar Romatz said.  ‘Like any curious human being, I was like: “Oh my gosh, I really want to be there for this…’ 
  • Wildlife Trooper Joseph Morris said, ‘it’s not as rare as you think that the moose makes it inside of a home,’ as there are roughly 175,000 of them in the state 

Alaskan firefighters rescued a baby moose that had fallen through a window and into a basement of a home southwest of Anchorage. 

Firefighters on Sunday were unexpectedly called to a Soldotna home – roughly 150 miles from Anchorage – to rescue a 500-pound moose that had fallen through a window while eating vegetation near the home around 10.30am. 

The window, which is a level below ground, has a small space in-between it and metal grating. The moose reportedly fell into the hole, with its back legs sliding through the window and into the basement before pulling the rest of him in. 

Photos shared from the Soldotna firefighters show a shocked moose standing near the window, surrounded by Legos and other children’s toys. 

‘I can’t even believe it,’ firefighter Gunnar Romatz told the Anchorage Daily News. ‘Like any curious human being, I was like: “Oh my gosh, I really want to be there for this because there’s no way anybody’s gonna believe this.”‘ 

Romatz – alongside six other firefighters, Central Emergency Services, and three biologists from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and two Alaska wildlife troopers – attended to the one-year-old moose to safely remove him. 

Alaskan firefighters had to rescue a moose (pictured) that had fallen through a window and into a basement

Alaskan firefighters had to rescue a moose (pictured) that had fallen through a window and into a basement

Six firefighters had to carry the partially sedated moose through the home in Soldotna - roughly 150 miles outside of Anchorage - on Sunday

Six firefighters had to carry the partially sedated moose through the home in Soldotna – roughly 150 miles outside of Anchorage – on Sunday 

The firefighters carried the animal through the basement, up a set of stairs, through a garage, before placing it on the snow-covered ground

The firefighters carried the animal through the basement, up a set of stairs, through a garage, before placing it on the snow-covered ground

Biologists partially sedated the large animal so he could be transported calmly through the house by six firefighters on a tarp that is typically used to carry unconscious patients. 

‘Luckily, he was conscious enough to honestly help us out a little bit,’ Romatz told the Anchorage Daily News. 

The firefighters carried the animal through the basement, up a set of stairs, through a garage, before placing it on the snow-covered ground. 

‘All the while, this moose is just picking its head up, and you’re two inches away from this moose, you know?’ he told the outlet. ‘So we’re like: “How are you?” And it just kind of looked at us, [like]: “Haven’t been in this situation before, you know.” Us either!’ 

Once outside again, a biologist tended to the minor wounds the moose had obtained during his fall and administered a reversal drug for the sedative. 

Ten to 15 minutes later, the moose was happily running around again, first heading back towards the window, before thinking better and running off towards the tree line. 

‘They were like: “Oh, no, no, no, no, no, no!” But it just ran off back into the tree line,’ Romatz told the Anchorage Daily News. 

Although firefighters don’t get a moose house-call every day, Wildlife Trooper Joseph Morris said ‘it’s not as rare as you think that the moose makes it inside of a home.’ 

Moose are commonplace in the state, with an estimated 175,000 to 200,000 living there. 

The moose calmly helped rescuers get him out of the house

The moose calmly helped rescuers get him out of the house 

Once outside again, biologists tended to the minor wounds the moose had obtained during his fall and administered a reversal drug for the sedative. Ten to 15 minutes later, the moose was happily running around again, first heading towards the window, before running off into the forest

Once outside again, biologists tended to the minor wounds the moose had obtained during his fall and administered a reversal drug for the sedative. Ten to 15 minutes later, the moose was happily running around again, first heading towards the window, before running off into the forest

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