Attorney General Suella Braverman roasts ‘Remainiac’ Robert Peston


‘This is your Remainiac make-believe’: Attorney General Suella Braverman roasts ITV’s Robert Peston after he claims Northern Ireland Brexit Bill ‘plainly breaks the law’ during extraordinary on-air spat

  • Attorney General Suella Braverman clashed with ITV presenter during interview
  • She insisted Robert Peston was spouting ‘Remainiac make-believe’ over NI Bill  
  • Ms Braverman also told BBC’s Sarah Montague to stop painting EU as ‘good guys’
  • European Commission has announced legal action over Northern Ireland row

Suella Braverman has branded ITV‘s Robert Peston a ‘Remainiac’ during an extraordinary on-air clash over the Northern Ireland protocol legislation.

The Attorney General accused the presenter of ‘make-believe’ and pretending the EU is ‘always in the right’ as he grilled her about moves to scrap Brexit rules.

Told by Peston that the legislation – which she has personally signed off – ‘plainly breaks the law’, a furious Ms Braverman shot back: ‘That’s not right Robert. 

‘I’m afraid I’ve got to say this is your Remainiac make-believe if I may put it that way, that actually the EU is always in the right and the UK is always in the wrong… ‘

Peston replied tetchily: ‘No, I think there’s a lot the EU does that is constantly wrong and I am definitely not a Remainiac.’

Suella Braverman (right) branded ITV's Robert Peston (left) a 'Remainiac' during an extraordinary on-air clash over the Northern Ireland protocol legislation

Suella Braverman (right) branded ITV’s Robert Peston (left) a ‘Remainiac’ during an extraordinary on-air clash over the Northern Ireland protocol legislation

The bruising exchange last night came after Ms Braverman mounted a similar attack during a BBC interview.    

On Radio 4’s World at One yesterday, presenter Sarah Montague asked why ministers ‘keep doing things that others judge to be illegal’ and whether she was ‘comfortable’ with the government’s ‘law-breaking’ reputation. 

Ms Braverman retorted: ‘With respect, I think that’s a BBC view, if you don’t mind me saying, that the UK Government is somehow always malevolent and the EU is always acting as the honest broker and the good guys.’

‘It was the Supreme Court that ruled on prorogation,’ Montague interjected.

Ms Braverman insisted her ‘preferred alternative’ to the Northern Ireland protocol was negotiation.

‘Listen my preferred alternative right now is negotiation and my invitation to our EU friends is to come back to the table and to engage substantively with our proposals,’ she said. 

‘They’ve failed to do that for over two years now and that’s why we’ve regrettably been left with no option but to take these measures.’

Ministers have been increasingly ready to call out what they perceive as bias in BBC interviews.

Foreign Secretary Liz Truss lashed out at Today presented Mishal Hussain earlier this week for suggesting the Northern Ireland protocol Bill would prevent the UK criticising authoritarian regimes like Russia. 

The full question posed to Ms Braverman was: ‘This Government keeps doing things that others judge to be illegal – we can go back to prorogation, Partygate, the Northern Ireland protocol, deporting asylum seekers – I wonder how comfortable you feel with the reputation that this Government has being built up as with regard to law-breaking?’

The clash came as Brussels threatened a trade war, launching a legal battle over Boris Johnson’s plans to abandon parts of the Brexit agreement to ease political pressure in Ulster. 

On Radio 4's World at One, presenter Sarah Montague asked why ministers 'keep doing things that others judge to be illegal'

On Radio 4’s World at One, presenter Sarah Montague asked why ministers ‘keep doing things that others judge to be illegal’

Attorney General Suella Braverman complained about the BBC's 'view' of Brexit wrangling as she was interviewed about the saga of the Northern Ireland protocol yesterday

Attorney General Suella Braverman complained about the BBC’s ‘view’ of Brexit wrangling as she was interviewed about the saga of the Northern Ireland protocol yesterday

The European Commission announced fresh legal action yesterday as part of a series of measures in response to the Government’s move to unilaterally scrap parts of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

The commission is also resuming legal proceedings against the UK that were shelved last year to facilitate negotiations on post-Brexit trade. 

The Government has been given two months to respond before the case goes to the European Court of Justice. 

Commission vice-president Maros Sefcovic warned Mr Johnson today that the Northern Ireland Protocol Bill, tabled on Monday, had ‘no legal or political justification whatsoever’, adding: ‘Let’s call a spade a spade: this is illegal.’

Downing Street has said ministers are ‘disappointed’ by the EU decision, with a spokesman adding: ‘The EU’s proposed approach, which doesn’t differ from what they have said previously, would increase burdens on business and citizens and take us backwards from where we are currently.

‘The infractions are related to the implementation of the protocol in our recently published Bill. It is difficult to see how scrapping grace periods and adding additional controls and checks would be the situation better.’

Commission vice-president Maros Sefcovic said it was 'clear that the UK broke the law' and said it new law was 'unjustified'

Commission vice-president Maros Sefcovic said it was ‘clear that the UK broke the law’ and said it new law was ‘unjustified’

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