Aussie shoppers despair as snow peas become the latest victim of price hikes at $42 a kilo


Aussie shoppers despair as snow peas become the latest victim of price hikes at $42 a kilo

  • Aussies have been left in shock after finding snow peas at $42 per kilo
  • The vegetable was just $6.99 per kilo in June 2021 – there has been a large boost
  • A viral TikTok clip showed a supermarket shelf strewn with the discarded stems
  • One viewer said the hack can save $1.50 as broccoli rises to $11.90 per kilo
  • Grocery prices are skyrocketing amidst bad weather and expensive fuel costs

A lawyer has revealed her shock at having to pay $42.80 per kilo for snow peas at the supermarket – just weeks after lettuce prices soared to $12 and broccoli was marked up to $11.90 per kilo.

Posting on TikTok the migration lawyer revealed she gasped when she saw the price of the popular staple – and again when she realised a tiny handful would cost her $6.

In June 2021 the crunchy green vegetable was available for just $6.99 per kilo. 

Posting on TikTok the migration lawyer revealed she gasped when she saw the price of the popular staple - and again when she realised a tiny handful would cost her $6

Posting on TikTok the migration lawyer revealed she gasped when she saw the price of the popular staple – and again when she realised a tiny handful would cost her $6

The snow peas were marked up at $42.80 per kilo - shocking the lawyer

a small handfull set her back $6, usually she would have been able to get almost a kilo of the peas for that

The snow peas were marked up at $42.80 per kilo – shocking the lawyer

Amid the rising cost of living, Australian shoppers are now resorting to snapping the stalks of broccoli after the price rose to an eyewatering $11.90 a kilo.  

A Coles customer in Melbourne showed the the supermarket shelf strewn with leftover broccoli stalks in a TikTok clip that has since gone viral.

Aussie shoppers are coming up with more ways to reduce the cost of their grocery bill with one viewer suggesting snapping the stalks of a broccoli makes them much lighter and can save up to $1.50. 

Aussie shoppers are coming up with more ways to save on their grocery bill amidst rising living costs with some breaking the stems off broccoli as the price skyrockets to $11.90 a kilo

Aussie shoppers are coming up with more ways to save on their grocery bill amidst rising living costs with some breaking the stems off broccoli as the price skyrockets to $11.90 a kilo

In a viral clip, a Melbourne woman suggested people not waste their broccoli stalks but instead chop them up and add them to meals the same way you would the florets

In a viral clip, a Melbourne woman suggested people not waste their broccoli stalks but instead chop them up and add them to meals the same way you would the florets

In the clip, the Melbourne woman suggested people not waste their broccoli stalks but instead chop them up and add them to meals the same way you would the florets.

‘Yes true…but I always break mine off as it weighs less and cost less,’ one commenter wrote to which the clip’s poster replied: ‘The cost of food is so expensive these days…do what works for you!’

‘I have weighed with and without, and it saves about $1.50 as the stalk is heavy, every bit helps these days,’ a second said. 

‘No disrespect but for that price I would do the same,’ a third replied. 

Flooding and bad weather in areas where much of Australia’s fresh produce is grown, has seen the cost of fruit and vegetables sky rocket recently with some stores charging up to $12 for a head of iceberg lettuce.

AUSVEG, the lobby group for growers, said the floods, combined with high petrol and fertiliser prices meant consumers would continue paying more for fresh food for much of 2022 as other farming regions struggled to keep up with demand. 

A top nutritionist has shared how you can save money on your grocery bill by swapping out their favourite vegetables for others that are lower in cost and higher in nutrients. 

Flooding and bad weather in areas where much of Australia's fresh produce is grown, has seen the cost of fruit and vegetables sky rocket recently with some stores charging up to $12 for a head of iceberg lettuce

Flooding and bad weather in areas where much of Australia’s fresh produce is grown, has seen the cost of fruit and vegetables sky rocket recently with some stores charging up to $12 for a head of iceberg lettuce 

Dietitian Susie Burrell, who has two honours degrees in nutrition and dietetics and psychology, instead of broccoli for $10 per kilo, cauliflower is a much cheaper and healthy substitution while tinned tomatoes can be more flavoursome and affordable than fresh varieties.

Cauliflower’s go for $4-$5 each at most major supermarkets and have many of the same nutritional benefits as broccoli. 

‘Broccoli is a superfood, rich in anti cancer molecules, Vitamin C and fibre but so is cauliflower at half the price,’ Susie told FEMAIL. 

Sydney dietitian Susie Burrell (pictured) has revealed which vegetables to add to your shopping list this winter that are low in both calories and cost

Sydney dietitian Susie Burrell (pictured) has revealed which vegetables to add to your shopping list this winter that are low in both calories and cost

Carrots are only $1-2 a kilo, far more nutrient dense and a versatile vegetable for all sorts of meals Susie said

'Carrots are rich in antioxidants and can be made as snacks, blended into soups or smoothies or roasted compared to zucchini which is much lower in nutrients overall,' Susie said

‘Carrots are rich in antioxidants and can be made as snacks, blended into soups or smoothies or roasted compared to zucchini which is much lower in nutrients overall,’ Susie said

‘Plus cauliflower makes a low carb rice alternative that can easily be made onto a tasty risotto.’ 

With fresh tomatoes costing $10-$14 per kilo, Susie said tinned tomatoes for $1-$2 a can is a perfect swap. 

Susie’s budget vegetable swaps 

❌Instead of broccoli for $12 a kilo

✅Buy cauliflower at $4-$5 each

❌Instead of  fresh tomatoes for $10-$14 a kilo

✅Buy canned tomatoes for $1-$2 a tin

❌Instead of lettuce for $6-$12 a head

✅Buy kale for $4-$5 a bunch or $1-$2 frozen

❌Instead of zucchini for $10-$12 a kilo

✅Buy carrots for $1-$2 a kilo

❌Instead of red capsicum for $10-$12 a kilo

✅Buy tinned beetroot for $3 a kilo 

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‘Not only is it hard to find fresh tomatoes that are flavoursome but canned tomatoes have been cooked, which means they offer the nutrient lycopene, known for its power anti cancer action especially for prostate cancer,’ she explained. 

Susie recommended opting for fresh or frozen kale rather than lettuce. 

‘Kale is one of the most nutrient dense greens you can find with exceptionally high amounts of nutrients including Vitamin C, beta carotene, and Vitamin K making it a smart daily addition in smoothies, stir fried or soups,’ she said. 

Carrots are only $1-2 a kilo, far more nutrient dense and a versatile vegetable for all sorts of meals Susie said. 

‘Carrots are rich sources of the antioxidant beta carotene and can be made as easy snacks, blended into soups or smoothies or roasted into chips compared to zucchini which is much lower in nutrients overall,’ she said. 

While red capsicum is rich in Vitamin C, Susie said the price and quality are ‘highly variable’. 

‘Beetroot on the other hand is just as nutrient and specifically shown to have a positive effect on blood pressure making beetroot based juices and smoothies a smart choice for those with high blood pressure,’ she said. 

Recipe: Parmesan and herb crusted carrot chips

Ingredients

 3 large carrots

1/4 cup grated parmesan

1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 

1 tsp garlic powder

1 tsp dried oregano

Tzatziki to serve 

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 200C and line a baking tray with grease proof paper

2. Cut each carrot into 16 long pieces

3. In a large bowl, combine carrot chips, parmesan, oil, garlic and oregano and mix to coat the chips in the seasonings

4. Arrange the coated chips on the baking tray, leaving space between each chip 

5. Bake for 15-20 minutes and serve with tzatziki dip 

Source: susieburrelldietician/Instagram

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