Aussie soldiers mock war crimes, make sexist posts as group ‘Make Diggers Violent Again’ is exposed

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Australian servicemen have been linked to a twisted social media page mocking war crimes, joking about killing Afghans and posting explicit – and sexist – content.

The Instagram page, titled State Sanctioned Violence, promotes brutality and details soldiers ‘punishing Talibs like god punished #antivax children’.

It is run by current and former Australian soldiers to ‘keep the legacy of the boys we lost alive’, as stated in the group’s bio.

Some of its content includes selling merchandise and poking fun at former special forces soldier turned federal MP Andrew Hastie who, when in command of an SAS regiment, reported a soldier for severing the hands of deceased Taliban to take back to camp.

The web group portrays Mr Hastie saying ‘Many hands make light work’ in a post displaying a picture of two servicemen and their dogs in Afghanistan. 

The Instagram account also comprises biographies of dead and living Australian Defence Force personnel. 

Some of its content includes selling merchandise and poking fun at former special forces soldier turned federal MP Andrew Hastie (pictured) who, when in command of an SAS regiment, reported a soldier for severing the hands of deceased Taliban to take back to camp

Some of its content includes selling merchandise and poking fun at former special forces soldier turned federal MP Andrew Hastie (pictured) who, when in command of an SAS regiment, reported a soldier for severing the hands of deceased Taliban to take back to camp

One post on ‘Trigga Trinny’, uploaded in January, details the action of a soldier at Camp Russell in Afghanistan, who ‘was in Delta Coy running a faded patch while he watched the life fade from dying Taliban fighters eyes.’

‘The Taliban would tell their kids if they didn’t go to bed on time, the #asiancommando would show up and take their soul. He never ate any children, but he did creep around at night, punishing Talibs like god punished #antivax children,’ it read.

‘Trinny was tougher than Chinese Algebra, the only man to get the #holytrinity of close calls in the #sandpit when he was shot in the chest plate by a #muj playing #hideandgoseek he was also known for #breakdancing on a pressure plate IED that didn’t go off and he picked a fight with his own Apache gunship and won.’

One post on ‘Trigga Trinny’ (pictured), uploaded in January, details the action of a soldier at Camp Russell in Afghanistan, who ‘was in Delta Coy running a faded patch while he watched the life fade from dying Taliban fighters eyes’

Another post, dedicated to CO SASR, reads: ‘I have two command priorities this year: Proxy wars and smashing whores’.

Also on the page is a mash-up of aerial footage showing people being shot, blown up and held at gun-point. 

One of its videos mocks the advisory warning from ABC broadcasts and reads: ‘Concern has been raised by the ADF leadership as to the appropriateness of some of the content shared in some of our write ups.’ 

‘The content is about as genuine as the current commander pretending to care about his best warriors as he prepares to throw dozens of them under the bus “to save the reputation of the command”,’ the post alongside the video said. 

State Sanctioned Violence has attracted thousands of followers since launching on July 15, 2019.

It is believed the account has been pulled down and re-launched multiple times.

State Sanctioned Violence merchandise is sold through a separate page, which requires a password to enter. 

The ADF said in a statement it was ‘not aware of any connection’ between serving personnel and the content posted on State Sanctioned Violence.

‘If Defence personnel are identified as having posted inappropriate material, they will be investigated and held accountable for contravening Defence policy,’ the ADF told ABC when the national broadcaster provided the name of the serving soldier allegedly linked to the account. 

Another post, dedicated to CO SASR, reads: 'I have two command priorities this year: Proxy wars and smashing whores' (pictured)

Another post, dedicated to CO SASR, reads: ‘I have two command priorities this year: Proxy wars and smashing whores’ (pictured)

The Instagram page gives a ‘special shout out’ to a supposed mole at the Royal Military College in Duntroon, Australian Capital Territory, for ‘giving us the goss from Defence’s Social media Incident Team.’

It also shows photos of its ‘Make Diggers Violent Again’ bumper sticker on campus and promoted on the bare breasts of a masked woman. 

The page emerged during a long-running inquiry by Justice Paul Brereton into the behaviour of Australian Special Forces in Afghanistan – examining at least 55 separate incidents.

The allegations include unlawful conduct by Australian soldiers, where they have killed unarmed Afghani men and children.

The investigation comes following revelations by an unidentified soldier who broke ranks with his colleagues by saying they ‘stepped over the line’ while serving in the country. 

Justice Brereton, the NSW Supreme Court judge and Army Reserve Major General received death threats earlier this year.

State Sanctioned Violence also shows photos of its 'Make Diggers Violent Again' bumper sticker on campus and promoted on the bare breasts of a masked woman (pictured)

State Sanctioned Violence also shows photos of its ‘Make Diggers Violent Again’ bumper sticker on campus and promoted on the bare breasts of a masked woman (pictured)

Flinders University military criminologist associate professor Ben Wadham told ABC the account reflected fears among low-ranked diggers that they might be held accountable for acts in Afghanistan, as well as the general disconnect some members might have felt from society.

‘When I look at the other issues around misconduct in the ADF over the last 30 years, it’s always blamed on the bad apple, or the bad orchard, the bad pocket of soldiers,’ he told ABC. 

‘It doesn’t justify or excuse anything, of course, but it’s a story that tells us that soldiers see themselves as not being particularly understood by the rest of Australia.’

Daily Mail Australia reached out to the State Sanctioned Violence Instagram page for comment.

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