Australia weather: Millions on the east coast forecast a washout Christmas during soaking summer

Millions of Australians to endure a SOAKING summer with Christmas set to be a wash-out across the east coast – here’s where you should be heading on holiday to catch some sun

  • East coast will receive above average rainfall this summer as well as cooler days
  • Those in the west will experience drier conditions with an elevated bushfire risk
  • Holidayers looking for sun will find it in central and north Queensland and the NT 
  • Forecasters say areas in Australia’s southeast will continue to flood this summer

Australians on the east coast will be lashed with above average rainfall this summer while those in the west look forward to months of endless sunshine. 

The Bureau of Meteorology forecasts it will be wetter than usual in Queensland, Victoria and New South Wales, but drier than normal in Western Australia.

Aussies looking to catch some sun will need to holiday in drier areas including coastal parts of central and north Queensland, the Northern Territory and most parts of WA where summer days are expected to be warmer than average.

In contrast, Victoria, coastal NSW, large parts of Queensland and northern and eastern Tasmania will receive above average rainfall as well as cooler temperatures. 

Australians on the east coast will be lashed with above average rainfall this summer while those in the west can look forward to months of endless sunshine

Australians on the east coast will be lashed with above average rainfall this summer while those in the west can look forward to months of endless sunshine

Victoria, coastal NSW, large parts of Queensland, and northern and eastern Tasmania will receive above average rainfall and cooler temperatures (pictured, a weather map indicating the elevated rainfall expected in December)

Victoria, coastal NSW, large parts of Queensland, and northern and eastern Tasmania will receive above average rainfall and cooler temperatures (pictured, a weather map indicating the elevated rainfall expected in December)

Across Australia, nights are expected to be generally warmer, particularly across the tropical north and in Tasmania.

However, cooler days will be experienced in most of NSW, southern parts of Queensland and across Victoria. 

In the BoM’s long-range forecast for December 2022 to February 2023, senior climatologist Dr Andrew Watkins said wetter than normal conditions were likely to continue for the east coast. 

This means several states will continue to flood as incessant rain gives saturated catchments little chance to dry out. 

‘Flooding has impacted vast areas in inland NSW and central Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania,’ Mr Watkins said. 

Senior climatologist Dr Andrew Watkins said wetter than normal conditions were likely to continue for the east coast this summer (pictured, a flood rescue in NSW's Central Coast)

Senior climatologist Dr Andrew Watkins said wetter than normal conditions were likely to continue for the east coast this summer (pictured, a flood rescue in NSW’s Central Coast)

North-eastern parts of NSW will experience below-average temperatures for this time of year (pictured) as well as southern parts of Queensland and Victoria

North-eastern parts of NSW will experience below-average temperatures for this time of year (pictured) as well as southern parts of Queensland and Victoria

‘High rainfall has kept soil very wet in many areas, particularly in southeastern Australia. Only Western Australia and parts of the North are drier than average.

‘Wet soils cannot absorb more when it rains, so run-off into dams has been high.’ 

SUMMER 2022-2023

Above average rainfall for the east coast, but drier in the west

Continued flood risk across the east

Warmer days and nights for many areas across Australia

Above normal bushfire potential in inland and central areas

Above average number of tropical cyclones in upcoming season

Prolonged heatwaves with higher humidity in southern areas 

Source: Bureau of Meteorology 

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Dozens of catchments along the east coast are more than 100 per cent full amid warnings for future flooding. 

In regards to the upcoming bushfire season, fires have an above average potential in inland and central areas as well as parts of WA and southwestern Tasmania. 

Dr Watkins explained that above average rainfall in Spring had encouraged the growth of vegetation in ‘many areas’ across Australia. 

‘This may dry out by late summer, providing fuel for grass-fires,’ he said, with fire agencies to monitor summer conditions closely. 

Ocean temperatures in northern Australia are above average, increasing the risk of tropical cyclones and heavy rainfall. 

Australia has a 73 per cent chance of experiencing an above average number of cyclones during the upcoming season. 

Communities in the country’s North have been urged to start preparing now. 

In happier news, factors driving recent rainfall are expected to change during summer as models suggest La Nina is set to weaken in early 2023. 

The Bureau of Meteorology has confirmed the weather phenomenon responsible for creating wet conditions will weaken in early 2023, with the Indian Ocean Dipole  ‘rapidly decaying’ in late spring. 

Weatherzone report some models suggest El Nino could make a return next year following three consecutive years of La Nina. 

Several states on the east coast will continue to experience flooding this summer as incessant rain gives saturated catchments little chance to dry out (pictured, residents surrounded by floodwaters are handed supplies in NSW's central-west earlier this month)

Several states on the east coast will continue to experience flooding this summer as incessant rain gives saturated catchments little chance to dry out (pictured, residents surrounded by floodwaters are handed supplies in NSW’s central-west earlier this month)

Modelling shows El Nino, associated with a warming of the central and eastern Pacific, could become the most likely state for the Pacific Ocean next winter. 

In weather this week, large parts of the southeast have enjoyed warmer temperatures while areas in NSW and South Australia continue to flood. 

Storms and rain have been forecast for the Top End as monsoon season approaches while parts of WA and SA are at elevated fire risk.

On Friday, low-pressure troughs are forecast to bring storms and showers to WA, western parts of SA, the NT and Queensland. 

Heavy rain is expected over the tropical north and inland parts of WA while elsewhere in the country remains fairly dry. 

A high-pressure system will drive showers and strong onshore winds over eastern parts of NSW and Tasmania.

The weekend will be dry for most of the country, with showers in Hobart and Darwin.

THE FOUR-DAY FORECAST FOR YOUR CITY:

 PERTH

Friday: Partly cloudy. Min 14 Max 23

Saturday: Mostly sunny. Min 13 Max 24

Sunday: Sunny. Min 12 Max 27

Monday: Sunny. Min 14 Max 29

 ADELAIDE

Friday: Sunny. Min 13 Max 31

Saturday: Possible shower. Min 21 Max 27

Sunday: Possible shower. Min 14 Max 20

Monday: Cloudy. Min 11 Max 19

 MELBOURNE

Friday: Partly cloudy. Min 11 Max 20

Saturday: Late shower or two. Min 11 Max 27

Sunday: Shower or two. Min 15 Max 20

Monday: Becoming cloudy. Min 10 Max 22

 HOBART

Friday: Shower or two. Min 10 Max 16

Saturday: Possible late shower. Min 8 Max 21

Sunday: Shower or two. Min 13 Max 17

Monday: Shower or two developing. Min 7 Max 17

 CANBERRA

Friday: Mostly sunny. Min 9 Max 24

Saturday: Partly cloudy. Min 9 Max 25

Sunday: Partly cloudy. Min 12 Max 25

Monday: Mostly sunny. Min 11 Max 23

 SYDNEY

Friday: Possible shower. Min 16 Max 25

Saturday: Mostly sunny. Min 16 Max 23

Sunday: Partly cloudy. Min 16 Max 30

Monday: Possible shower. Min 17 Max 22

 BRISBANE

Friday: Sunny. Min 18 Max 31

Saturday: Sunny. Min 18 Max 31

Sunday: Partly cloudy. Min 20 Max 32

Monday: Shower or two. Min 22 Max 31

DARWIN 

Friday: Shower or two, possible storm. Min 26 Max 33

Saturday: Shower or two, possible storm. Min 26 Max 33

Sunday: Shower or two, possible storm. Min 26 Max 33

Monday: Shower or two, possible storm. Min 26 Max 32

 

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