Australian boys make a deadly discovery deep in the outback

Australian boys make an astonishing discovery deep in the outback that was left hidden for more than 70 years – and it could have KILLED them

  • Two boys found an unexploded WWII hand grenade at Noonkanbah Station, WA
  • A photo shows the boys with the dusty historic explosive near the creek bank
  • Locals have found other explosives in the area, which was a WWII military base

Two young boys found an unexploded hand grenade left behind from a World War II military base in Australia’s desert.

The boys were blown away when they found the grenade three weeks ago near a creek in Noonkanbah Station, 380km east of Broome in northern Western Australia.

A photo from Ngaarda Media shows them standing with the deadly wartime weapon that was hidden for more than 70 years.

Two WA boys discovered a WWII hand grenade (above) near Noonkanbah Station, an old military base

The unexploded hand grenade (above) is believed to be more than 70 years old and was found near a former WWII military base

The unexploded hand grenade (above) is believed to be more than 70 years old and was found near a former WWII military base

Noonkanbah Station acted as a base for the Royal Australian Air Force and Dutch army during WWII.

Aussies applauded the boys for reporting the grenade and called for the government to properly clear the area of explosives.

‘What an amazing find and very glad to hear no one got hurt,’ one person wrote.

Noonkanbah Station (above) was used as a Royal Australian Airforce and Dutch military base in WWII

Noonkanbah Station (above) was used as a Royal Australian Airforce and Dutch military base in WWII

‘Pity the military hasn’t gone in and cleaned up properly. The govt says nothing out there to see or destroy,’ another wrote.

‘Clever boys to know it is dangerous, thank god it’s all safe,’ another said. 

Other locals have occasionally reported finding remnants of the station’s history including Irene Jimbidie who grew up in the area.

Locals have reported finding explosives in the Noonkanbah Station since it was used military base in WWII (above)

Locals have reported finding explosives in the Noonkanbah Station since it was used military base in WWII (above)

She said an unexploded bomb was discovered in the 1980s.

‘The bomb was found at one of the stockyards,’ Ms Jimbidie told Ngaarda Media.

‘After they’d done mustering, the horses would have soften the top soil, and this old bomb was sticking out, just the top part.’

WHAT IS NOONKANBAH STATION? 

Noonkanbah Station (or just Noonkanbah) is a pastoral lease, both a cattle and sheep station, on the Fitzroy River between Camballin and Fitzroy Crossing in the south central Kimberley region of Western Australia. 

The station was pegged out in the 1880s and covered approximately 4,000 square kilometres.

During World War II the Royal Australian Air Force established a base, at the civil airfield at the station on 1 March 1943. 

Large petrol and bomb dumps were established and the airfield was used by the Netherlands East Indies Air Force as a staging base. No 24 Squadron, 25 Squadron and 31 Squadron all utilised the airfield. The airfield was large enough to handle B-24 Liberators.

On 30 September 1944, the airfield base was made non-operational, and on 24 December 1945, the airfield was disbanded.

The traditional owners – the people of the Yungngora Community – were employed by the station owners until 1971 when they walked off over a pay and conditions dispute.

 In 1976 the station was purchased by the Aboriginal Land Fund to be developed by the traditional owners. It has since then been run by the people of the Yungngora Community.  

The station was the scene for an intense political dispute when the government of the day allowed exploration company AMAX to drill for oil in sacred sites. 

The mining boom experienced in the 1970s led to hundreds of resource tenements being pegged on the pastoral station in the Kimberley, but an anthropological report found the land covered by the station had spiritual significance for the Yungngora community.

Western Australia’s Premier, Charles Court, was adamant that the exploration should go ahead regardless – and a convoy of 45 non-union drilling rigs and trucks left Perth protected by hundreds of police on 7 August 1980. 

Violent confrontations between police and Noonkanbah protesters ensued, culminating in the drilling rigs forcing their way through community picket lines onto sacred land.

In April 2007, the Yungngora people had their native title recognised over the Noonkanbah land.

Source – Wikipedia 

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