Australian children some of the world’s biggest bullies, data from OECD shows

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Australian children are some of the worst bullies in the world, with new data showing 30 per cent of high school students are tormented in the playground.

The nation’s bullying rates are seven per cent higher than the global average of 23 per cent, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

The OECD’s latest report revealed 10 per cent of Australian students had been hit or pushed by peers during school hours. 

The figure is three per cent higher than the international average. 

The report showed one in seven Australian teens had their belongings taken or destroyed by schoolmates, 12 per cent were victims of gossip and 10 per cent were threatened. 

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's latest report revealed 10 per cent of Australian students were hit or pushed around by their peers during school hours (stock)

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s latest report revealed 10 per cent of Australian students were hit or pushed around by their peers during school hours (stock)

The OECD’s report is based on a survey of up to 10 million 15-year-old pupils worldwide. 

Australian teenagers were two to three times more likely to be bullied compared to Chinese and Korean children, the report showed.

‘Bullying at school can have long-lasting negative consequences for students’ psychological well-being and increases the likelihood of dropping out of school,’ the report says, the Daily Telegraph reported.  

The report warned home schooling during COVID-19 lockdowns could disadvantage children from impoverished families as well (stock)

The report warned home schooling during COVID-19 lockdowns could disadvantage children from impoverished families as well (stock) 

In another report, Combatting COVID-19’s effect on Children, OECD mentioned increased unsupervised online internet use during lockdown had magnified issues around sexual exploitation and cyber-bullying.

‘As many children already face conduct and contact risks in the digital environment and will likely face increased exposure to such risks, including those related to sexting, cyberbullying, or sexual exploitation, governments and digital service providers will need to consider taking actions to protect children from abuse in the digital environment,’ it read.

‘For instance, the increased likelihood of sexual exploitation of children in the digital environment due to the COVID-19 pandemic means that helplines, hotlines, awareness centres and appropriate legal protections will be even more important for children at risk.’

In another report, Combatting COVID-19's effect on Children , OECD mentioned increased unsupervised online internet use had magnified issues around sexual exploitation and cyber-bullying (stock)

In another report, Combatting COVID-19’s effect on Children , OECD mentioned increased unsupervised online internet use had magnified issues around sexual exploitation and cyber-bullying (stock) 

A third report, titled The Impact Of COVID-19 On Education: Insights From Education At A Glance 2020, said the pandemic had a severe impact on higher education as universities closed campuses and countries borders remained closed.

It encouraged universities to ‘reinvent’ their learning environments to expand digitalisation and stated the COVID-19 crisis prompted questions ‘about the value offered by a university education which includes networking and social opportunities’.

‘Students are already demanding a partial refund of their tuition fees and many institutions have made pro-rata refunds on room and board, or have offered fee deferrals,’ the report read.

‘With the enrolment of international students for the next academic year severely compromised, this will cut into universities’ bottom line, affecting not only their core education services, but also the financial support they provide domestic students, as well as research and development activities.’  

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