Australian’s warmest and driest July in 20 years

This is the map that shows just how desperate some areas of Australia are for drought-breaking rain – and there’s no relief in sight with a hot, dry summer a certainty.

Looking at the past six months, large areas of NSW have experienced their lowest rainfall on record, and most of the rest of the state isn’t far behind.

Almost all of NSW has received less than 20 per cent of its usual rainfall since January, and Australia as a whole just experienced its warmest and driest July in 20 years. 

The map shows which areas experienced their lowest rainfall on record compared to the highest on record 

The map shows which areas experienced their lowest rainfall on record compared to the highest on record 

The Bureau of Meteorology reported an extreme increase in rainfall deficiencies for NSW

The Bureau of Meteorology reported an extreme increase in rainfall deficiencies for NSW

Weatherzone reports that Forbes, in NSW’s central west, only received 0.8mm of rain at the beginning of the month and did not record any rainfall for the rest of July. 

Meanwhile, extreme temperatures already recorded in NSW and south-east Queensland this winter look set to continue amid concerns a ‘hot and deadly’ summer is on the way.

A map released by BoM shows NSW suffered through serious rainfall deficiencies in the first six months of the year

A map released by BoM shows NSW suffered through serious rainfall deficiencies in the first six months of the year

Sydney experienced 13 days with temperatures of 20 degrees in July (pictured maximum temperatures in NSW from the beginning of the year)

Sydney experienced 13 days with temperatures of 20 degrees in July (pictured maximum temperatures in NSW from the beginning of the year)

ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes heatwave expert Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick told Weatherzone that Australians should be expecting extreme weather considering the dryness and warmth of the past few months. 

‘We are heading towards an El Nino summer, so we are more likely to have hotter and more extreme weather,’ Dr Perkins-Kirkpatrick said. 

‘We should certainly be worried.’    

Australians just experienced the warmest and driest July in 20 years and experts say it's only going to get worse

Australians just experienced the warmest and driest July in 20 years and experts say it’s only going to get worse

Temperatures so far this winter have been unusually high, with Sydney and large regions of eastern Australia encountering an average high of 19.8 degrees last month – 3.4 degrees more than what was expected, according to Weatherzone.

Sydney recorded 13 days where temperatures reached 20 degrees. The last time Sydney experienced such warm temperatures in July was back in 2013 with a record high of 19.5 degrees.  

With such a dry and warm July and above-average temperatures expected, the chances of El Niño forming in spring is at 50 per cent – which is double the normal chance, according to Weatherzone.

Five of eight models indicate El Niño levels will be reached in the southern hemisphere’s springtime, while a sixth model says El Niño will be reached in December.

This means Australia could be expecting even drier months and hotter temperatures as it heads towards spring and summer.

ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes heatwave expert Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick said  Australians should be expecting extreme weather

ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes heatwave expert Sarah Perkins-Kirkpatrick said  Australians should be expecting extreme weather

'We are heading towards an El Nino summer, so we are more likely to have hotter and more extreme weather,' Dr Perkins-Kirkpatrick said

‘We are heading towards an El Nino summer, so we are more likely to have hotter and more extreme weather,’ Dr Perkins-Kirkpatrick said

Graeme Brittain, a meteorologist with Weatherzone told Sydney Morning Herald the warm temperatures are due to the high pressures which affects more regions. 

Apart from NSW, an extreme decrease in rain was also recorded for South Australia, northern Victoria and Western Australia, with an average rainfall of below 30 per cent.

From May 1 to July 31 NSW experienced 50-100 mm of rainfall while inland Australia only had 2-10mm of rainfall 

From May 1 to July 31 NSW experienced 50-100 mm of rainfall while inland Australia only had 2-10mm of rainfall 

In July, Tasmania experienced the highest record of rain, while inland Australia went through below average rainfall. Most of NSW and south-east West Australia recorded ‘very much below average’ levels of rainfall.   

The rest of August is expected to continue with the ‘above-average’ warm temperatures, Mr Brittain said. 

Sydney can expect sunny days with temperatures reaching a maximum of 22 degrees, while Queensland will also enjoy temperatures of 26 degrees as we enter the final month of winter.

NSW suffered a serious to severe rainfall deficiencies this year with a recorded average rainfall of below 30 per cent

NSW suffered a serious to severe rainfall deficiencies this year with a recorded average rainfall of below 30 per cent

Victoria and South Australia will continue to endure cooler temperatures and rain for the rest of the week. 

Meanwhile, Perth residents are being urged to stay indoors as BoM put out a severe weather warning of damaging winds in excess of 125km/h which could cause significant damage to homes and properties.      

Hobart continues to experience cold temperatures and should expect a bit of rain towards the ends of the week. 

Canberra will shiver in -5 degrees and should also expect a bit of rain towards the end of the week. while the Northern Territory sweats through temperatures of 33 degrees. 

AUSTRALIA’S WEATHER: THE FIVE-DAY FORECAST IN YOUR CITY

SYDNEY       

THURSDAY: Min 8. Max 19. Partly cloudy.

FRIDAY: Min 9. Max 23. Mostly sunny.

SATURDAY: Min 10. Max 21. Sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 7. Max 22. Sunny.

MONDAY: Min 10. Max 21. Possible shower.

CANBERRA    

THURSDAY: Min -5. Max 15. Morning frost and fog.

FRIDAY: Min -2. Max 18. Morning frost. Late showers.

SATURDAY: Min 0. Max 14. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min -3. Max 15. Partly cloudy.

MONDAY: Min 1. Max 12. Shower or two.

PERTH     

THURSDAY: Min 6. Max 16. Possible early storm. Showers.

FRIDAY: Min 11. Max 18. Showers increasing.

SATURDAY: Min 9. Max 15. Showers easing.

SUNDAY: Min 7. Max 16. Partly cloudy.

MONDAY: Min 5. Max 17. Partly cloudy. 

BRISBANE     

THURSDAY: Min 10. Max 23. Mostly sunny.

FRIDAY: Min 13. Max 23. Partly cloudy.

SATURDAY: Min 12. Max 27. Mostly sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 12. Max 26. Mostly sunny.

MONDAY: Min 14. Max 26. Partly cloudy.

MELBOURNE    

THURSDAY: Min 7. Max 17. Sunny. Becoming windy.

FRIDAY: Min 11. Max 16. Showers developing.

SATURDAY: Min 7. Max 15. Mostly sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 10. Max 16. Possible late shower.

MONDAY: Min 9. Max 14. A few showers.

ADELAIDE    

THURSDAY: Min 11. Max 21. Showers developing. Windy.

FRIDAY: Min 9. Max 15. Showers easing.

SATURDAY: Min 9. Max 17. Cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 9. Max 14. Showers.

MONDAY: Min 8. Max 13. Showers. 

HOBART      

THURSDAY: Min 2. Max 14. Partly cloudy.

FRIDAY: Min 6. Max 15. Partly cloudy.

SATURDAY: Min 5. Max 15. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 8. Max 15. Partly cloudy.

MONDAY: Min 6. Max 14. Shower or two. 

DARWIN      

THURSDAY: Min 20. Max 30. Mostly sunny. 

FRIDAY: Min 20. Max 31. Mostly sunny.

SATURDAY: Min 20. Max 32. Mostly sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 20. Max 31. Mostly sunny.

MONDAY: Min 21. Max 32. Sunny.

 

 Source: BOM

 

 

 

 

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