BBC Breakfast host Naga Munchetty caught moonlighting for the SECOND time

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Naga Munchetty has been rapped by BBC bosses after appearing in a business interview series for Natwest. 

The BBC Breakfast presenter, who earns up to £195,000 per year, hosted webinars for the banking giant one month after she was scolded for appearing in a paid corporate video for car maker Aston Martin.

In the videos, titled ‘In Conversation With…’, the presenter speaks to high profile guests including former politician Ed Balls, the captain of England’s cricket team, Eoin Morgan, and perfume entrepreneur Jo Malone. 

Naga Munchetty (left) was already in hot water after appearing in the corporate promo video for Aston Martin (pictured), with BBC bosses saying she may have once more put the broadcaster's impartiality at risk

 Naga Munchetty (left) was already in hot water after appearing in the corporate promo video for Aston Martin (pictured), with BBC bosses saying she may have once more put the broadcaster’s impartiality at risk

But BBC insiders are reportedly ‘furious about her external engagements.’ 

One source told the Sun: ‘How can she remain impartial if she’s doing corporate gigs for a banking giant in her free time?

‘What happens if there’s a financial story she has to discuss on the sofa, it’s an impossible situation.’

Last month, Munchetty hosted a webinar video for the luxury carmaker without gaining approval from her employer or declaring her fee, sources have told i.

A BBC spokesperson said Munchetty ‘has been reminded of the risk of conflict of interest when undergoing external engagements’, adding, ‘we have discussed the implications of this with her.’

The video played up how Aston Martin was ‘engaging and assisting employees’ during the coronavirus crisis despite the company’s plans to cut 500 jobs – a fifth of its workforce.

Its chief executive Andy Palmer was fired after the company’s share price plummeted and falling sales lead to a £227m loss.

The title screenshot of the Aston Martin corporate video Naga Munchetty took part in. During the video, Freedman says the company initially put 75% of its staff on furlough to protect the company's bottom line: 'There was uncertainty for us when we were having to make those decisions'

The title screenshot of the Aston Martin corporate video Naga Munchetty took part in. During the video, Freedman says the company initially put 75% of its staff on furlough to protect the company’s bottom line: ‘There was uncertainty for us when we were having to make those decisions’

BBC bosses have told Munchetty that she risked a ‘conflict of interest’ and potentially jeopardised the BBC’s impartiality, since she could be asked to discuss Aston Martin’s financial troubles on air.

The BBC’s spokesperson advised that its editorial guidelines allow journalists to carry out external speaking, or chairing at private engagements as long as they maintain objectivity and impartiality.

‘On this occasion, as the event was public facing, we have advised Naga that this could be seen as a conflict of interest and this will be kept in mind for future editorial decisions.’

The BBC Breakfast presenter earns up to £195,000 per year

The BBC Breakfast presenter earns up to £195,000 per year

In the webinar, titled ‘Road To Resilience: How Aston Martin is protecting and engaging their employees and customers’, Munchetty asks Aston Martin’s vice president and chief marketing officer Peter Freedman how the car maker has ‘reacted to this challenging and rapidly changing landscape by protecting and engaging their employees, communities and customers’.

Freedman explained the company had, at one point, placed 75% of its staff on furlough.

Munchetty asked: ‘What reassurances do they have now when it comes to their future… with Aston Martin?’

Freedman answered: ‘We wanted to give confidence to people that we’re furloughing them because there’s a lot of uncertainty, we need to protect ourselves as a business and ultimately we needed to ensure our costs were at a manageable stage, because nobody at that point knew when those restrictions were going to lift.

‘There was uncertainty for us when we were having to make those decisions.’ 

MailOnline has contacted the BBC for comment.  

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