Bikie snitch who became Australia’s first refuge after brutal bashing lives lonely life in Canada

Stevan Utah was once an associate of the notorious motorcycle gang in Queensland before turning against the group in the early 2000s

Stevan Utah was once an associate of the notorious motorcycle gang in Queensland before turning against the group in the early 2000s 

A bikie informant who became Australia’s first known refugee is living a lonely life in Canada after being almost killed by the Bandidos more than a decade earlier.

Stevan Utah was once an associate of the notorious motorcycle gang in Queensland before turning against them in the early 2000s.

He provided information about the Bandidos to police for years until a sensational newspaper article exposed Mr Utah and prompted him to flee to North America.

Although Canada granted him asylum in 2017 in a landmark case that ruled Australian authorities failed to protect his life, he lodged legal action against the government, claiming the process was too slow.

Earlier this week Canadian Federal Court of Appeals made public that the lawsuit had been rejected.

Although he’s now been living in Canada for almost 15 years, he said the frosty nation still doesn’t feel like home.

Mr Utah grew up in Victoria and became familiar with the Bandidos gang back in the 1990s (a Bandidos chapter is pictured in Melbourne)

Mr Utah grew up in Victoria and became familiar with the Bandidos gang back in the 1990s (a Bandidos chapter is pictured in Melbourne)

‘I am always alone. To put it into perspective, people talked about isolation of lockdowns and so forth with Covid-19. I actually didn’t notice a single change to my life with Covid. Welcome to my world,’ Mr Utah told NCA NewsWire.

The informant’s world started to come undone when the article in 2006 outlined how the Australian Crime Commission was conducting an intelligence operation into outlaw motorcycle gangs.

Senior Bandidos members started to become wary of Mr Utah and rightly suspected he was working with authorities.

After growing up in Victoria he became familiar with the gang back in the 1990s.

He was fresh out of the army and started associating with a high-ranking Bandidos member.

By the year 2000, he had been present when a 54-year-old man was murdered. Four years later, he led police to the body.

Stevan Utah (pictured) has revealed he's living a lonely life in Canada after being brutally bashed by the Bandidos more than a decade earlier

Stevan Utah (pictured) has revealed he’s living a lonely life in Canada after being brutally bashed by the Bandidos more than a decade earlier

When word got out that Mr Utah was a snitch, he was taken to bushland in Queensland and beaten to within an inch of his life by patched members of the gang.

But he somehow managed to run away and eventually made his escape to Canada.

Duncan McNab, a veteran crime reporter who penned a book about the Bandidos in 2008, gave evidence at Mr Utah’s asylum hearing.

‘He was bloody lucky to get away with his life,’ the author said.

For 10 years from 2007 to 2017 Mr Utah lived in ‘limbo’ as a non citizen waiting for his case to be heard.

He could not get a job, receive healthcare, or open a bank account.

The prolonged ordeal left him with post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, which he outlined in his legal battle against the Canadian Government.

Mr Utah said he still lives under constant threat and continues to fear for his life.

When reflecting on the day he almost died at the hands of leather-clad bikies, he said at that time and no one would have missed him.

‘Now I am about learning, about reflection and about changing what we can for a better tomorrow based on yesterday’s lessons,’ Mr Utah said.

Duncan McNab, a veteran crime reporter who penned a book about the Bandidos in 2008, (pictured) gave evidence at Mr Utah's asylum hearing. 'He was bloody lucky to get away with his life,' the author said

Duncan McNab, a veteran crime reporter who penned a book about the Bandidos in 2008, (pictured) gave evidence at Mr Utah’s asylum hearing. ‘He was bloody lucky to get away with his life,’ the author said

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