Bill Clinton admits he sent federal agents to Area 51 to find out if there were aliens


Bill Clinton admits he sent federal agents to Area 51 to find out if there were aliens during his presidency

  • Bill Clinton, 75, told James Corden, 43, that he and former Chief of Staff John Podesta sent the late National Security Advisor Sandy Burger to Area 51
  • Podesta, who is reportedly a huge science fiction fan, and Clinton wanted to ‘make sure there were no aliens’ 
  • Although Burger never found any, after the Clintons visited the Keck telescope in Hawaii in 2018, Clinton still isn’t too sure there’s not other life out there
  • The scientist there reportedly argue whether there’s an 85 to 95 percent chance there’s other life out there 
  • Clinton warned the public to take care of the planet because ‘there’s a lot of mysteries out there’ 
  • Bill also told James Corden that there is a ‘fair chance’ the United States could ‘completely lose our constitutional democracy’
  • Follows the January 6 committee hearings and polls suggesting voters think American democracy may ‘cease’ to exist 

Former President Bill Clinton told James Cordon he sent federal agents to Area 51 to find out if aliens were hiding there. 

Clinton, 75, joined Cordon, 43, on his show on Wednesday evening, revealing he and his former Chief of Staff John Podesta, sent a team to the classified military base.

‘When I was president, and I had a Chief of Staff John Podesta – he loved science fiction – he made every attempt to find out everything about Roswell. And we also sent people to Area 51, we wanted to make sure there were no aliens.’ 

When Cordon excitedly asked the former president who exactly he sent to the coveted area, he grabbed the late-night host’s shoulder and said: ‘Oh, if I told you that.’ 

However, Clinton ended up revealing that, while the alien hunt was a disappointment, the base was used as a research and test ground for stealth aircraft. 

‘I got to find out how we’re going to deal with this, because [Area 51] is where we do a lot our invisibility research in terms of technology, like how do we fly airplanes that aren’t pick up by radar and all that,’ he said. ‘So that’s why they’re so secretive.’ 

Bill Clinton, 75, told James Cordon, 43, that he and former Chief of Staff John Podesta sent the late National Security Advisor Sandy Burger to Area 51

Bill Clinton, 75, told James Cordon, 43, that he and former Chief of Staff John Podesta sent the late National Security Advisor Sandy Burger to Area 51

The top secret area (pictured) has always been surrounded by alien conspiracy theories, but Clinton revealed his team did not find any aliens

The top secret area (pictured) has always been surrounded by alien conspiracy theories, but Clinton revealed his team did not find any aliens 

He also revealed that he and his wife, former presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, visited the largest telescope in the world, the Keck telescope, in Hawaii in 2018. 

And although he revealed there were ‘no aliens that I know [of]’ at Area 51, scientists working on the telescope told the presidential couple that argued that the chance of other life in the universe was between 85 to 95 percent. 

‘In other words, it’s very unlikely that there is not other life,’ he told Cordon. ‘There’s a lot of mysteries out there, which is why I think we should take good care of this planet. I think we ought to hang onto it if we can. 

‘But I also think it should keep us humble. There’s a lot of things we don’t know.’  

In addition, both Clintons suggested that American democracy is teetering on the edge of existence in a pair of separate interviews this week.

The pair both said the government as we know it is at risk after the third January 6 committee hearing and a new poll saying a majority of both Democrats and Republicans believe America will ‘cease to exist’ as a democracy. 

The former president also told Corden that he fears the United States could ‘completely lose our constitutional democracy.’

Former president Bill told CBS's The Late Late Show host James Corden on Wednesday night that he fears the United States could 'completely lose our constitutional democracy

Hillary painted a similarly bleak picture in an interview with the Financial Time s in an interview published less than 48 hours later on Friday

Bill and Hillary Clinton both suggested that American democracy is teetering on the edge of existence in a pair of separate interviews this week

Hillary painted a similarly bleak picture in an interview with the Financial Times in an interview published less than 48 hours later on Friday.

Reporter Edward Luce suggested to her that the Democrats ‘seem to be going out of their way to lose elections by elevating activist causes, notably the transgender debate, which are relevant only to a small minority’. 

‘We are standing on the precipice of losing our democracy, and everything that everybody else cares about then goes out the window.’ 

‘Look, the most important thing is to win the next election. The alternative is so frightening that whatever does not help you win should not be a priority.

Corden asked Clinton how he stays ‘so positive in what has been a very, very dark few years,’ without mentioning Donald Trump by name.

The Democrat admitted it was ‘impossible to be pessimistic about the future’ while he was watching his grandchildren growing up, but went on to paint a bleak picture of America’s future – just hours after the third hearing from the January 6 committee hearing.

‘I actually think there’s a fair chance that we could completely lose our constitutional democracy for a couple of decades if we keep making — if we make bad decisions, Clinton added.  

‘I’m not naïve about this. I’ve been in a lot of fights. I’ve lost some, won a bunch. I’ve been elated and heartbroken,’ he continued.

‘But I’ve never before been as worried about the structure of our democratic form of government,’ he added.

At her lunch with the Financial Times, Hillary was also asked about the possibility of Roe v. Wade being overturned.  

‘If you go down the rabbit hole of far right intellectuals, you see that birth control, gay marriage — all of it is at risk,’ she said.

Then referencing the The Handmaid’s Tale author Margaret Atwood, she discussed what the Christian ‘endgame’ is and referenced how the future could mimic the hit Hulu show.

‘The level of insidious rulemaking to further oppress women almost knows no end,’ Clinton says. ‘You look at this and how could you not but think that Margaret Atwood was a prophet? She’s not just a brilliant writer, she was a prophet.’

Corden asked Clinton how he stays 'so positive in what has been a very, very dark few years,' without mentioning Donald Trump by name. The Democrat admitted it was 'impossible to be pessimistic about the future' while he was watching his grandchildren growing up, but went on to paint a bleak picture of America's future - just hours after the third hearing from the January 6 committee hearing

Corden asked Clinton how he stays ‘so positive in what has been a very, very dark few years,’ without mentioning Donald Trump by name. The Democrat admitted it was ‘impossible to be pessimistic about the future’ while he was watching his grandchildren growing up, but went on to paint a bleak picture of America’s future – just hours after the third hearing from the January 6 committee hearing

Their interviews followed the Yahoo News/YouGov poll released on Wednesday showing that 55 percent of Democrats and 53% of Republicans share that belief in a stunning sign of pessimism about the country’s future. 

Additionally the poll found that a majority of Republicans – 52 percent – say it’s likely that ‘there will be a civil war in the United States in [their] lifetime’ while half of independents – 50 percent – and a plurality of Democrats – 46 percent – agree. 

The poll, which surveyed 1,541 adults and was conduced from June 10 (the day of the first January 6th hearing) until June 13 (the day of the second hearing), also found Americans have largely given up on one another.  

Members of both parties picked negative phrases to describe the person across the political aisle.

Republicans, when asked to choose the phrase that best ‘describes most people on the other side of the political aisle from you,’ a majority used ‘out of touch with reality’ (30 percent), a ‘threat to America’ (25 percent), ‘immoral’ (8 percent) and a ‘threat to me personally’ (4 percent) to describe Democrats. 

Very few opted for ‘well-meaning’ (4 percent) or ‘not that different from me’ (6 percent). 

Democrats felt the same about Republicans, using phrases such ‘out of touch with reality’ (27 percent), a ‘threat to America’ (23 percent), ‘immoral’ (7 percent) and a ‘threat to me personally’ (4 percent) to describe them. 

Very few used words like ‘well-meaning’ (7 percent) or ‘not that different from me’ (5 percent). 

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