Birmingham restaurant issues furious rant against customers

A Michelin-guide restaurant has branded customers who want all dining restrictions relaxed ‘f****** mental’ in a furious rant about lockdown reopening on Twitter.

Alex Claridge, chef-owner of The Wildnerness, a modern British fine dining establishment in Birmingham‘s upmarket Jewellery Quarter said he was ‘flabbergasted’ by customers who were cancelling reservations because they are keeping they in place, calling them ‘f****** nuts’.

On Monday, all Covid-related restrictions were lifted in the UK, meaning people could dine in groups of more than six, nightclubs could reopen and face masks and social distancing are no longer compulsory.

However, with cases still rising businesses across the country are keeping restrictions in place and many restaurants are still insisting on face coverings when customers aren’t seated at the table. 

Speaking to FEMAIL, Alex who wrote the tweets, said: ‘I have to stand for something. Obviously, the problem is there’s always someone with very small penis, who takes defensive, but it’s a very much a vocal minority’. 

Alex Claridge, chef-owner of The Wildnerness (pictured) a modern British fine dining establishment in Birmingham's upmarket Jewellery Quarter which is listed in the Michelin Guide, said he was 'flabbergasted' by customers who were cancelling reservations because they are keeping they in place, calling them 'f****** nuts'

Alex Claridge, chef-owner of The Wildnerness (pictured) a modern British fine dining establishment in Birmingham’s upmarket Jewellery Quarter which is listed in the Michelin Guide, said he was ‘flabbergasted’ by customers who were cancelling reservations because they are keeping they in place, calling them ‘f****** nuts’

It comes after The Wildnderness Twitter account shared messages from angry customers cancelling their bookings, writing:  ‘To everyone who has emailed us to confirm they are angry that we won’t be relaxing all restrictions whilst we monitor the situation I am flabbergasted. This is clearly an emotive issue but honestly you’re all f******nuts,’ they wrote in one tweet.

They later added: ‘Why are you f****** mental? I won’t ever apologise for putting safety and welfare first. How can some cotton over ya gob when going for a piss offend you so much?’ 

‘My till comes second fiddle to doing what I think is the best course of action to protect my guests and prevent a third lockdown…. 

The Twitter account also shared messages from Covid-sceptic customers with one writing: ‘Eating out is treat and masks ruin it’  adding ‘I won’t be supporting your restaurant until this stops’.

It comes after The Wildnderness twitter account shared messages from angry customers cancelling their bookings, writing: 'To everyone who has emailed us to confirm they are angry that we won¿t be relaxing all restrictions whilst we monitor the situation I am flabbergasted. This is clearly an emotive issue but honestly you¿re all f******nuts,' they wrote in one tweet.

It comes after The Wildnderness twitter account shared messages from angry customers cancelling their bookings, writing: ‘To everyone who has emailed us to confirm they are angry that we won’t be relaxing all restrictions whilst we monitor the situation I am flabbergasted. This is clearly an emotive issue but honestly you’re all f******nuts,’ they wrote in one tweet.

Alex explained that customers are sent an email when they book the restaurant as a courtesy, explaining that tables are socially distanced, they’ll be using track and trace, and they’ll be required to wear masks.    

‘It’s nothing crazy. I didn’t say you must arrive covered in the mixture of PVA glue and peacock feathers.   

Despite the complaints, Alex told FEMAIL they have had overwhelming support for keeping Covid protocols in place – even conducting a Twitter poll of more than 3000 customers which saw 94 per cent support keeping restrictions.

‘We have to explore the worst case scenarios at any given choice. If we take things slowly, we’re going to go into another lockdown restaurants won’t survive.

The Twitter account also shared messages from Covid-sceptic customers with one writing: 'Eating out is treat and masks ruin it' adding 'I won't be supporting your restaurant until this stops'.

The Twitter account also shared messages from Covid-sceptic customers with one writing: ‘Eating out is treat and masks ruin it’ adding ‘I won’t be supporting your restaurant until this stops’.

‘If the worst case scenario is that your customer has to wear a face mask when he goes through a wee, that’s good.

‘If that’s the biggest tragedy you’ve ever faced is putting cloth over your face while you hold your willy, then you are very much in a blessed place.

‘As recent as last week the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham has suspended elective procedures. 

‘If there’s another lockdown, there will not be restaurants and bars at the end of it. 

‘I’m going to protect my team and my guests. If you don’t want to come because of it, it doesn’t bother me. Two covers a year don’t make a restaurant. 

The menu consists of five or seven course meals made for £75 to £100 featuring seasonal ingredients - including wagyu beef, quail and 'the bat' - a tiramisu in the shape of a bat (pictured)

The menu consists of five or seven course meals made for £75 to £100 featuring seasonal ingredients – including wagyu beef, quail and ‘the bat’ – a tiramisu in the shape of a bat (pictured) 

One of the top restaurants in the second city, The Wilderness offers a modern British dining experience.

It has a Michelin Plate, meaning it serves: ‘fresh ingredients’ that are ‘carefully prepared’. 

The red book describes it as: ‘dark, moody restaurant with an open kitchen’.

‘Choose between two interesting, tersely worded set menus of globally influenced dishes with a playful, showy style. As well as matching wine flights, there are creative non-alcoholic pairings too,’ the say.

The menu consists of five or seven course meals made for £75 to £100 featuring seasonal ingredients – including wagyu beef, quail and ‘the bat’ – atiramisu in the shape of a bat. 

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