Bodyguard of Derek Chauvin reveals what it was like guarding ‘the most hated an in America’ 

The bodyguard hired to keep Derek Chauvin safe while he was on trial for the murder of George Floyd has revealed what it was like guarding ‘the most hated an in America.’ 

Scott Yelle described how he lead a secret security operation which used safe houses, armored SUVS, and even disguises to keep the Minneapolis cop safe while he was on trial for the murder of George Floyd.

Yelle said that the security detail would wear bulletproof vests and kept a go-bag with mace, tourniquets and gas masks in the car in case they were attacked.

The bodyguard even used Snapchat to monitor where big clusters of protesters were, using the social media app’s map feature.

‘This was some agitator’s Super Bowl,’ Yelle told Inside Edition, of the opportunity for some protesters to take Chauvin out during his trips to and from his safehouse, some 35miles away from the Minneapolis courthouse where he was on trial, across state lines in Wisconsin.

Bodyguard of Derek Chauvin, Scott Yelle, described how he lead a secret security operation which used safe houses, armored SUVS, and even disguises to keep the Minneapolis cop safe while he was on trial for the murder of George Floyd

Bodyguard of Derek Chauvin, Scott Yelle, described how he lead a secret security operation which used safe houses, armored SUVS, and even disguises to keep the Minneapolis cop safe while he was on trial for the murder of George Floyd

Despite being smuggled into a parking lot beneath the courthouse each morning, Chauvin (pictured) was still thought to be in danger even in court

Video of the incident went viral, and soon protests against police brutality spread throughout the United States, lasting for months, turning violent at times

Cop Derek Chauvin became ‘the most hated an in America’ after he knelt on the neck of George Floyd for nine minutes in shocking footage from May 25, 2020 (right). Despite being smuggled into a parking lot beneath the courthouse each morning, Chauvin (pictured in court, left) was still thought to be in danger even in court

Yelle said getting ‘one of the most hated men in America’ back-and-forth from the courthouse everyday was a logistical nightmare and that he feared someone opening fire or throwing a Molotov cocktail at them.

Despite being smuggled into a parking lot beneath the courthouse each morning, Chauvin was still thought to be in danger even in court. 

Yelle said he even refused to let Chauvin eat any of the food provided by court officials. 

The bodyguard told Fabian that he used a fleet of bulletproof SUVs to protect Chauvin from assassination attempts and everyone traveling with Chauvin had to be mindful of the threats from crowds of protesters outside court each day. 

He added that he had to be aware of dangers including, ‘people shooting, people throwing rocks, bricks, anything they could find.’ 

Yelle described the secretive operation to protect Chauvin despite receiving hundreds of death threats

Yelle described the secretive operation to protect Chauvin despite receiving hundreds of death threats 

Yelle told INSIDE EDITION that rather than being in police custody, Chauvin was actually secured in a classified location 35 miles away from the Minneapolis courthouse where he was on trial, across state lines in Wisconsin.

Yelle told INSIDE EDITION that rather than being in police custody, Chauvin was actually secured in a classified location 35 miles away from the Minneapolis courthouse where he was on trial, across state lines in Wisconsin. 

‘We also had to worry about people throwing Molotov,’ Yelle said, adding that he  received threats every single day.

In addition, Yelle said there were secret safe houses in suburban neighborhood, where Chauvin could be taken in an emergency. 

He said they would even drive there on a round-about way to throw off anyone following them.

Throughout the time Yelle protected Chauvin, he mentioned he only saw him express remorse once. 

‘I said, ‘Is there anything I can do for you? And he said, ‘You can take me back a year,’ Yelle said.  

PICTURED: Former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin in custody

PICTURED: Former Minneapolis Police officer Derek Chauvin

Chauvin received a sentence of 22 and a half years in prison, with the possibility of supervised relief, contingent on good behavior after serving two-thirds of his sentence or 15 years for second-degree murder.

George Floyd died on May 25, 2020, after Chauvin knelt on his neck for more than nine minutes as Floyd, 46, lay face-down crying: 'I can't breathe.'

George Floyd died on May 25, 2020, after Chauvin knelt on his neck for more than nine minutes as Floyd, 46, lay face-down crying: ‘I can’t breathe.’

Floyd died on May 25, 2020, after Chauvin knelt on his neck for more than nine minutes as Floyd, 46, lay face-down crying: ‘I can’t breathe.’

Video of the incident went viral, and soon protests against police brutality spread throughout the United States, lasting for months, turning violent at times.

Chauvin was fired by the Minneapolis Police Department in the aftermath and was soon arrested.

He was found guilty of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter. 

On June 25, 2021, he received a sentence of 22 and a half years in prison, with the possibility of supervised relief, contingent on good behavior after serving two-thirds of his sentence or 15 years for second-degree murder. 

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