Boris Johnson plotter suggests Britain should consider rejoining EU single market


Boris Johnson plotter suggests Britain should consider rejoining EU single market to solve Northern Ireland issue

  • A Tory plotter argued it was a ‘no brainer’ to rethink leaving the EU single market
  • Tory backbencher Tobias Ellwood said the country should opt for a softer Brexit
  • But fellow Tory Michael Fabricant hit back at his fellow minister, saying rejoining ‘would mean our courts losing supremacy to the European Court of Justice’

One of the plotters attempting to remove Boris Johnson said yesterday that it was a ‘no brainer’ to rethink leaving the EU’s single market.

Tobias Ellwood argued the country should opt for a softer Brexit, even if it means accepting the free movement of people.

The Bournemouth East MP hit back at criticism from fellow backbenchers concerned that rebels are trying to undermine the country’s exit from the EU.

Tobias Ellwood argued the country should opt for a softer Brexit, even if it means accepting the free movement of people

Tobias Ellwood argued the country should opt for a softer Brexit, even if it means accepting the free movement of people

He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: ‘This model of Brexit is not working well. Single market would solve the Northern Ireland crisis, get us back into the Dublin convention so we can return migrants, and improve our trade relationship with Europe. It is actually a no-brainer.’

But fellow Tory Michael Fabricant dismissed his suggestion.

The Lichfield MP tweeted: ‘[Rejoining the single market] would mean our courts losing supremacy to the European Court of Justice, and the producers of goods having to comply with laws set in Brussels. Tobias, that is not Brexit.’

Tory Michael Fabricant tweeted: ‘[Rejoining the single market] would mean our courts losing supremacy to the European Court of Justice, and the producers of goods having to comply with laws set in Brussels'

Tory Michael Fabricant tweeted: ‘[Rejoining the single market] would mean our courts losing supremacy to the European Court of Justice, and the producers of goods having to comply with laws set in Brussels’

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