Chandler Tran dies from osteosarcoma , dad Cong confirms, as boy’s heartbreaking final act revealed

EXCLUSIVE: Heartbreaking final act of Lego-obsessed boy, 8, as he died of a rare cancer after his family found a seemingly harmless ‘pea-sized’ lump on his leg – here’s what his parents NEED you to know now

  • Eight-year-old Chandler Tran loses his battle with a rare form of cancer
  • Chandler passed away on Friday after being diagnosed with osteosarcoma
  • Family found pea-sized lump on Easter weekend which led to shock diagnosis
  • Chandler underwent chemotherapy but the cancer only continued to multiply
  • His father Cong Tran said they made the difficult decision to stop treatment
  • Chandler died in his sleep on Friday but held on so the family could say goodbye 

An eight-year-old boy whose limp turned out to be an incurable type of cancer has tragically died with his dad revealing his son was more interested in his family’s wellbeing than his own as he took his final breath.

Lego-obsessed Chandler Tran, 8, was diagnosed with osteosarcoma – a rare form of bone cancer – after he started struggling to walk in April and his parents spotted a pea-sized lump on his shin. 

Chandler tragically succumbed to the cancer on Friday morning after battling the painful disease for seven months and his family decided to stop treatment. 

His father Cong Tran, 42, told Daily Mail Australia that even as Chandler lay dying and in pain he was more interested in making sure his family was OK as he passed away. 

‘Chandler chose to leave us peacefully in his sleep at 2am on Friday, November 25, 2022,’ Mr Tran said.

‘He waited until everyone had come to say their goodbyes that day and then for mummy to go to sleep before taking his final little breath.

‘We already miss him so much.’ 

Mr Tran said he was now telling Chandler’s story to ‘anyone who will listen’ in a bid to raise awareness about osteosarcoma.

A family has been left devastated after their eight-year-old boy Chandler Tran (pictured) lost his battle with a rare form of cancer

A family has been left devastated after their eight-year-old boy Chandler Tran (pictured) lost his battle with a rare form of cancer 

Chandler threw himself into LEGO after his dire diagnosis, completing more than 30 sets and could recite the history of the company

Chandler threw himself into LEGO after his dire diagnosis, completing more than 30 sets and could recite the history of the company

WHAT IS OSTEOSARCOMA? 

Osteosarcoma is a type of bone cancer beginning in the cells that form bones. 

It is most often found in the long bones, most commonly the legs, but sometimes the arms. 

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A GoFundMe page set up to help the family cover medical expenses and funeral costs has raised more than $100,000.

Mr Tran previously told Daily Mail Australia in in November the family originally believed their son had just bumped into something when they noticed the bump, no larger than a pea, on his leg.

‘It was Good Friday and he had just finished up vacation care when he came home and we saw he was limping a bit,’ Mr Tran said.

‘We thought he must have bumped his knee or his shin on something but he told us that nothing had happened.

‘It was just a little bump on his leg, like the size of a pea and I was poking it.

‘I had a feel of it and it was quite firm but it wasn’t causing him much pain other than when I was poking it so we thought let’s sleep on it and see if anything changes overnight.’

His father Cong Tran, 42, (standing) told Daily Mail Australia the family originally assumed their son had just bumped into something when they discovered the small lump

His father Cong Tran, 42, (standing) told Daily Mail Australia the family originally assumed their son had just bumped into something when they discovered the small lump

After multiple scans, doctors discovered Chandler had osteosarcoma in his leg - a rare form of bone cancer - as well as cancerous tumours on his lungs

After multiple scans, doctors discovered Chandler had osteosarcoma in his leg – a rare form of bone cancer – as well as cancerous tumours on his lungs

Mr Tran took his son to Fairfield Hospital, in Sydney’s west, where he received an X-ray and MRI scan.

Results came back on May 4, confirming their worst fears that Chandler had a rare form of bone cancer in his leg, osteosarcoma, as well as cancerous tumours on his lungs.

Chandler began chemotherapy and was put on a limb salvage plan in an attempt to save his leg.

However, the cancer continued to spread and after his leg continued to deteriorate the family decided to make the difficult decision to amputate above the knee.

However as treatment continued Chandler's leg got progressively worse and the family made the decision to amputate it to remove the cancer

However as treatment continued Chandler’s leg got progressively worse and the family made the decision to amputate it to remove the cancer

‘We explained it all to Chandler and he was very understanding and knew what it was all about,’ Mr Tran said.

‘In the couple of days before his amputation he was having a good think about it and said he was fine with it. He was very good with that.’

Just before the surgery, Chandler asked his father to help him write a goodbye message to his leg.

He wrote: ‘Dear leg, I’ll miss you so much when you’re gone, love Chandler,’ with the picture taken on his dad’s tablet.

The operation took place at the start of October and he remained in Westmead Children’s Hospital to continue his chemotherapy.

Before the amputation, Mr Tran helped his son say goodbye to his leg. He wrote: 'Dear leg, I'll miss you so much when you're gone, love Chandler,' with the picture taken on his tablet

Before the amputation, Mr Tran helped his son say goodbye to his leg. He wrote: ‘Dear leg, I’ll miss you so much when you’re gone, love Chandler,’ with the picture taken on his tablet

About a week after Chandler's leg amputation, scans showed his lungs has continued to get worse and the cancer had progressed with doctors telling the family there was nothing more they could do

About a week after Chandler’s leg amputation, scans showed his lungs has continued to get worse and the cancer had progressed with doctors telling the family there was nothing more they could do 

However, about a week after the leg amputation scans showed his lungs had continued to get worse and the cancer had progressed.

‘There was fluid in his right lung and the size and number of tumours had all increased throughout mid-October,’ Mr Tran said.

‘We had a meeting with the doctors and it was at that point where we all agreed there was no point doing any further treatment for the cancer as it had progressed too far in the lungs.

‘They told us there was nothing more they could do.’

Mr Tran said while the decision in October to stop treatment meant they knew the end was coming, it also meant Chandler wouldn’t have to suffer through more medical procedures.

‘More treatment would have meant more chemotherapy and clinical trials but ultimately all that stuff would have caused more hospital time, pain and suffering and it would have been a very, very dire outcome anyway,’ Mr Tran said.

‘If it is only going to prolong his suffering, we would rather not make this boy suffer any more than he has in the last six months.

‘Rather than him suffer, knowing we are going to lose him anyway we would rather keep him comfortable and spend time out of the hospital with him.’

The family said while the decision to stop treatment meant they knew the end was coming, it also meant young Chandler wouldn't have to suffer through more treatments

The family said while the decision to stop treatment meant they knew the end was coming, it also meant young Chandler wouldn’t have to suffer through more treatments

Chandler returned home on on November 4 but over the next three weeks continuously returned to hospital with setbacks

Chandler returned home on on November 4 but over the next three weeks continuously returned to hospital with setbacks

Since returning home on November 4, he had many setbacks and over the next three weeks, he had to return to hospital on multiple occasions. 

Mr Tran said since stopping the treatment the family’s focus was on spending time with Chandler and raising awareness about osteosarcoma.

‘The main thing is awareness about osteosarcoma in general,’ Mr Tran said.

‘Ninety-nine per cent of people think of leukemia when a kid has cancer but more education and awareness needs to be done about osteosarcoma.

‘We want to share Chandler’s story with the world, to anyone willing to listen.’

Chandler passed away at 2am on Friday

 Chandler passed away at 2am on Friday 

Chandler’s incredible success building LEGO  

Chandler threw himself nto LEGO after his dire diagnosis, completing more than 30 sets.

His dad Cong Tran previously told Daily Mail Australia how Chandler completed the Icons Lion Knights’ Castle, a set of more than 4,500 pieces.

‘He got busy with LEGO while he had been receiving treatment and so we piled on the LEGO and that is how he spent his time in hospital,’ Mr Tran said.

‘He has a very vivid imagination and he has been building LEGO since he was about two when he figured out he can build anything he wants.

‘When he was six he started asking for the 18-plus age sets and wanted to learn LEGO techniques and do the 4,000-odd piece sets.’

Chandler began chemotherapy and was put on a limb salvage plan in an attempt to save his leg

His father Cong Tran, 42, told Daily Mail Australia Chandler made sure his family was OK before taking his final breath on Friday morning

Mr Tran said while in hospital he completed the Icons Lion Knights' Castle, a set of more than 4,500 pieces

 Mr Tran said while in hospital he completed the Icons Lion Knights’ Castle, a set of more than 4,500 pieces 

Mr Tran said while in hospital he had completed massive sets and the obsession allowed him to stay comfortable and occupied throughout his treatment.

‘His favourite set is the Icons Lion Knights’ Castle and that was more than 4,500 pieces.

‘He built the first half at home and we bought it into the hospital to finish and that is how he spent the weeks after his surgery,’ he said.

‘All these builds have helped keep him somewhat comfortable and occupied.

‘He researches a lot about LEGO, knows the history of the company, watches reviews, building techniques and everything and that is how he came across his hero Tiago Catarino, a former LEGO designer in Denmark.’

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