Child becomes third person with meningococcal disease after attending Splendour in the Grass

A child becomes the third person with meningococcal after attending Splendour in the Grass as fresh warnings about the disease are issued

  • NSW north coast child becomes third case of meningococcal from festival
  • Earlier, a Sydney man in 40s who attended Splendour died with disease
  • Meningococcal bacteria are carried by about 10 per cent of the population 
  • Then spreads to others through droplets by coughing, sneezing or even kissing 

A child from the NSW north coast is the third person to contract meningococcal disease after attending the Splendour In The Grass music festival.

Earlier this month a Sydney man in his 40s who had attended the festival died with the disease.

NSW Health has urged anyone who attended Splendour In The Grass – which took place from July 21-24 at the North Byron Parklands – to be alert for symptoms of the potentially fatal disease.

A child from the NSW north coast is the third person linked to the recent Splendour In The Grass festival (pictured) to contract meningococcal disease

A child from the NSW north coast is the third person linked to the recent Splendour In The Grass festival (pictured) to contract meningococcal disease

Earlier this month a Sydney man in his 40s who had attended the festival died with the disease

Earlier this month a Sydney man in his 40s who had attended the festival died with the disease

The ill-fated festival was almost cancelled after heavy rain wiped out the first day of performances when the site was turned into a mudbath.

Up to 50,000 a day attended the event, the first of its kind in three years because of Covid-19.

In early August all ticketholders were emailed by health officials to warn them of the possible meningococcal outbreak.

‘We are urging people who attended the event in the North Byron Parklands on July 21 – 24 to be alert to the symptoms of meningococcal disease and act immediately if they appear,’ NSW Health said in a statement.

Splendour In The Grass (pictured) was marred this year by appalling weather conditions which left frozen music fans drenched and covered in mud

Splendour In The Grass (pictured) was marred this year by appalling weather conditions which left frozen music fans drenched and covered in mud

‘Although the disease is uncommon, it can be severe.’

Health experts have said meningococcal bacteria are carried by about 10 per cent of the population which can be at the back of the throat or in nose. 

MENINGOCOCCAL SYMPTOMS

Sudden onset of fever 

Headaches

Neck stiffness

Joint pain

Rash of purple-red spots or bruises

Dislike of bright lights

Nausea and vomiting 

Irritability and high-pitched crying in children

Refusal to eat in children

Difficulty waking in children 

Source: NSW Health

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It is then spread to others through droplets caused by coughing and sneezing or even kissing.

The majority of cases can make a full recovery if the infection can be detected at its early stages and through the use of the correct antibiotics

There have been 17 cases of meningococcal disease reported in NSW this year, but the most dangerous period for the disease is now in late winter and early spring.

Health chiefs have urged parents of children under five to be vigilant as they are most at risk, along with 15 to 25-year-olds.

Anyone showing symptoms – which can include a red or purple rash, fever, headache, stiffness, light sensitivity, nausea, diarrhoea, drowsiness and confusion – are urged to contact a doctor immediately.

Although the disease is uncommon it can be fatal, with authorities warning it can develop very quickly and kill within hours.

A Northern Territory man in his 30s died with meningococcal on Friday, while a two-year-old child with the disease died in rural South Australia in July.

Health authorities in the territory said the man had undertaken no recent interstate or international travel.

Health experts have said meningococcal bacteria  (pictured) are carried by about 10 per cent of the population which can be at the back of the throat or in nose

Health experts have said meningococcal bacteria  (pictured) are carried by about 10 per cent of the population which can be at the back of the throat or in nose 

Source

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