Christine McGuinness says her children ‘don’t understand’ why they can’t see her mum as she shields

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Christine McGuinness has revealed her three children are struggling to adjust to being separated from her mum, as she begins shielding after being diagnosed with breast cancer.

The star, 32, took to Instagram to share an emotional post on Monday, explaining that her children Leo and Penelope, seven, and Felicity, four, ‘don’t understand’ why they aren’t seeing their Nan as she’s a ‘huge part of their routine.’

Christine went onto explain that after undergoing a lumpectomy her mum is about to start six months of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, meaning she will have to stay at home and shield as she is at an increased risk during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Difficult: Christine McGuinness has revealed her three children are struggling to understand being separated from her mum, as she begins shielding after being diagnosed with breast cancer

Difficult: Christine McGuinness has revealed her three children are struggling to understand being separated from her mum, as she begins shielding after being diagnosed with breast cancer

Christine shared a sweet snap of her mum during a recent outing with her three children, as she candidly detailed the struggles of being separated from her.

The wife of presenter Paddy McGuinness sent her own support to those who were battling cancer, adding that she was trying to keep positive as she could still chat to her mum on the phone.

She wrote: ‘Weekends aren’t the same without nanny. My mum is a huge part of my children’s routine and they just don’t understand why they can’t see nanny anymore.’

Doing well: She said, 'As you know, my mum was recently diagnosed with breast cancer and that is a whole other situation. Just to update you she is doing really well'

Candid: The star took to Instagram on Monday to pen an emotional post explaining that her children ‘don’t understand’ why they can’t 

Open: The wife of presenter Paddy McGuinness sent her own support to those who were battling cancer, and insisted that she was keeping positive

Open: The wife of presenter Paddy McGuinness sent her own support to those who were battling cancer, and insisted that she was keeping positive

‘Lots of you have asked how she’s doing, She done amazing with her lumpectomy and is starting 6 months of chemotherapy and radio therapy next week.

Sending love to anyone fighting cancer right now especially those going through it alone because of Covid.

‘My mum has got to shield herself for at least 6 months, it’s awful, we can’t even give her a cuddle. I miss her so much but I’m grateful she is alive, staying positive and ready to try her best. And she is always on the end of the phone.

‘Praying this time passes as fast as possible.’

Earlier this month, Christine admitted she is having a ‘difficult time’ as she revealed that her mother has now had a lumpectomy following her breast cancer diagnosis. 

In emotional video message to fans, shared on Instagram last week, the former Real Housewives of Cheshire star explained why she had not been on social media much of late. 

Christine, who is married to Top Gear presenter Paddy McGuinness, said: ‘I don’t know where to start. Obviously I’ve been quiet on here and it’s a conscious decision to spend less time on social media whilst I’ve got so much going on personally. 

‘Loads of you have asked if I’m OK and I’m just letting you know I am OK. I’m having a difficult time which I’m not going to go into too much because my heart is beating, I’m alive.’ 

Candid: Earlier this month Christine revealed that her beloved mum had been diagnosed with breast cancer, and will now have to shield while she undergoes treatment

Candid: Earlier this month Christine revealed that her beloved mum had been diagnosed with breast cancer, and will now have to shield while she undergoes treatment

She continued: ‘As you know, my mum was recently diagnosed with breast cancer and that is a whole other situation. Just to update you she is doing really well.

‘She had a lumpectomy this week and she’s at home recovering now so we’re just waiting to hear what the next steps are. The doctor wants to make sure it hasn’t spread before he gives her a treatment plan with chemotherapy and radiotherapy.’

At the start of the month, Christine revealed that her beloved mother was recently been diagnosed with breast cancer during a heartbreaking Instagram post.  

The glamour model admitted she had been ‘hit hard’ by the news, as she detailed her mum’s magical bond with her three children, twins Leo and Penelope, seven, and Felicity, four, who she spends almost every weekend with. 

The Liverpool native referred to her mum as her ‘best friend’ and ‘rock’, while also admitting that she is a ‘proper Scouse Ma.’

Love: Christine shares her three children with her TV presenter husband Paddy McGuinness

Love: Christine shares her three children with her TV presenter husband Paddy McGuinness

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and affects more than two MILLION women a year

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Each year in the UK there are more than 55,000 new cases, and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women. In the US, it strikes 266,000 each year and kills 40,000. But what causes it and how can it be treated?

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer develops from a cancerous cell which develops in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the breasts.

When the breast cancer has spread into surrounding breast tissue it is called an ‘invasive’ breast cancer. Some people are diagnosed with ‘carcinoma in situ’, where no cancer cells have grown beyond the duct or lobule.

Most cases develop in women over the age of 50 but younger women are sometimes affected. Breast cancer can develop in men though this is rare.

Staging means how big the cancer is and whether it has spread. Stage 1 is the earliest stage and stage 4 means the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

The cancerous cells are graded from low, which means a slow growth, to high, which is fast growing. High grade cancers are more likely to come back after they have first been treated.

What causes breast cancer?

A cancerous tumour starts from one abnormal cell. The exact reason why a cell becomes cancerous is unclear. It is thought that something damages or alters certain genes in the cell. This makes the cell abnormal and multiply ‘out of control’.

Although breast cancer can develop for no apparent reason, there are some risk factors that can increase the chance of developing breast cancer, such as genetics.

What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The usual first symptom is a painless lump in the breast, although most breast lumps are not cancerous and are fluid filled cysts, which are benign. 

The first place that breast cancer usually spreads to is the lymph nodes in the armpit. If this occurs you will develop a swelling or lump in an armpit.

How is breast cancer diagnosed?

  • Initial assessment: A doctor examines the breasts and armpits. They may do tests such as a mammography, a special x-ray of the breast tissue which can indicate the possibility of tumours.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy is when a small sample of tissue is removed from a part of the body. The sample is then examined under the microscope to look for abnormal cells. The sample can confirm or rule out cancer.

If you are confirmed to have breast cancer, further tests may be needed to assess if it has spread. For example, blood tests, an ultrasound scan of the liver or a chest x-ray.

How is breast cancer treated?

Treatment options which may be considered include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone treatment. Often a combination of two or more of these treatments are used.

  • Surgery: Breast-conserving surgery or the removal of the affected breast depending on the size of the tumour.
  • Radiotherapy: A treatment which uses high energy beams of radiation focussed on cancerous tissue. This kills cancer cells, or stops cancer cells from multiplying. It is mainly used in addition to surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: A treatment of cancer by using anti-cancer drugs which kill cancer cells, or stop them from multiplying
  • Hormone treatments: Some types of breast cancer are affected by the ‘female’ hormone oestrogen, which can stimulate the cancer cells to divide and multiply. Treatments which reduce the level of these hormones, or prevent them from working, are commonly used in people with breast cancer.

How successful is treatment?

The outlook is best in those who are diagnosed when the cancer is still small, and has not spread. Surgical removal of a tumour in an early stage may then give a good chance of cure.

The routine mammography offered to women between the ages of 50 and 70 mean more breast cancers are being diagnosed and treated at an early stage.

For more information visit breastcancercare.org.uk, breastcancernow.org or www.cancerhelp.org.uk

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