Coffin Confessor reveals bizarre requests he’s received from Australians to carry out when they die

Sponsored Video
Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  

A private investigator turned ‘Coffin Confessor’ who gets paid to carry out the wishes of the dead has revealed more of his client’s bizarre final requests.

Bill Edgar, 52, quit his job on the Gold Coast three years ago when a terminally ill man asked him to interrupt his funeral to tell his best mate he knew he was ‘trying to screw’ his wife. 

He has since gatecrashed dozens of funerals to pass on messages the dead couldn’t get off their chest when they were alive.      

His upcoming jobs involve a man who betrayed his brother for years and a millionaire father ready to share the secrets of his wealth. 

Bill Edgar, 52, (pictured) has been dubbed the 'Coffin Confessor' after quitting his job as a private investigator on the Gold Coast two years ago to gatecrash funerals

Bill Edgar, 52, (pictured) has been dubbed the ‘Coffin Confessor’ after quitting his job as a private investigator on the Gold Coast two years ago to gatecrash funerals

‘I can tell you that I have a brother that’s confessing to sleeping with his brother’s wife for the last six years,’ he told news.com.au

Another secret involves exposing a so-called businessman’s real source of wealth. 

The man in his 80s never worked a day in his life, but was telling his family for years he had worked in offshore deals and sales.

But he actually won the Gold Lotto.  

‘He never told anyone in his family and his family continues to think he’s the best businessman in the world and he’s never worked a day in his life. He’s fooled them all – he just won lotto. He lives a great life,’ Mr Edgar said.  

Bill Edgar was a private investigator until an elderly man asked him to intercept his funeral three years ago to call out his best friend for 'trying to screw' his wife

Bill Edgar was a private investigator until an elderly man asked him to intercept his funeral three years ago to call out his best friend for ‘trying to screw’ his wife

He will also reveal how much of that money the family will be inheriting. 

‘That’s going to be a shock to a few in the family.’ 

Speaking on the Kyle and Jackie O show on Tuesday, Mr Edgar – whose clients pay up to $10,000 for his services – revealed some of his most shocking past confessions.

‘I’ve exposed family secrets, sexual affairs and intimate relationships between brothers and sisters,’ he told the stunned hosts.

Mr Edgar said his worst job was when he had to reveal a girlfriend had slept with her partner’s mother and father.

Along with airing people's dirty laundry, Mr Edgar spends most of his time purging his dead clients' homes of embarrassing items to spare their families the discomfort (stock image of a funeral)

Along with airing people’s dirty laundry, Mr Edgar spends most of his time purging his dead clients’ homes of embarrassing items to spare their families the discomfort (stock image of a funeral)

Another request involved telling the family of a bikie gang member that he was gay and his lover was in the crowd.

‘Half a dozen people left, a couple gave me the finger and told me that I was going to get bashed, but the majority said, ‘we know what he was like, and we knew’.’

To avoid gatecrashing funerals with false assumptions and accusations, Mr Edgar uses his private investigation skills to verify his clients’ claims.

‘I’ve got to get some actual facts too – I’ve got to look in to it. I can’t just go to a funeral and announce bullsh**t, it’s got to be legitimate stuff.’

The Coffin Confessor is growing increasingly busy after introducing a new online offering

The Coffin Confessor is growing increasingly busy after introducing a new online offering

Along with airing the dead’s dirty laundry, Mr Edgar spends most of his time purging his dead clients’ homes of embarrassing items to spare their families the discomfort.

One customer was an 88-year-old man from Toowoomba in Queensland who asked the coffin confessor to clean his attic.

‘He said ‘you’re going to find some items in there that are going to shock you”.

‘I got in the attic and there’s a sex swing, there’s toys – you name it, it was there.’

Mr Edgar explained that he never has to ask his clients questions about their seemingly bizarre secrets because ‘they divulge everything … they’ve got nothing to lose’.

Some clients have also used his services to confess to crimes.

While he is obliged to report admissions to the police, Mr Edgar skirts around the problem by asking the person write confession down in a letter and address it to themselves.

The coffin confessor picks the unopened letter up after the client dies and places it in a drawer and leaves it there.

Bill Edgar has also been asked to prick some clients in the arm with a pin before the burial to make sure they're really dead

Bill Edgar has also been asked to prick some clients in the arm with a pin before the burial to make sure they’re really dead

‘It’s illegal to open someone else’s mail,’ he said.

Other strange requests come from clients who want want to be buried with specific items, such as money, firearms, and mobile phones with torches because they’re scared of the dark.

Some ask for glass coffins, caskets filled with water or fitted with speakers programmed to make screaming sounds as it’s lowered into the ground. 

Meanwhile, the Coffin Confessor is becoming increasingly busy after introducing a new online offering.

For $10 Australians can head online to upload eulogies or confessions which will be sent to a nominated family member when they die. 

Part his newfound demand is linked to the coronavirus pandemic. 

Since the crisis hit he has received more than 8200 uploads on the site. 

Bill Edgar has since made a thriving business divulging his dead clients' explosive secrets to their heartbroken families during burials and will readings

Bill Edgar has since made a thriving business divulging his dead clients’ explosive secrets to their heartbroken families during burials and will readings

Source


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  

Related posts

Leave a Comment