Controversial NHS child gender clinic to shut after damning report

NHS will SHUT its controversial Tavistock transgender clinic after damning report found it rushed teens onto lifechanging puberty blocking drugs

The NHS‘s controversial gender clinic for children will shut its doors after a damming report found it was ‘unsafe’.

An ongoing review of Tavistock’s Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) clinic accused it of rushing children into life-altering treatment on puberty blockers. 

GIDS is the sole provider of gender dysphoria and gender identify services for children and young people across the whole of the UK.

But NHS England has said the the clinic must now shut its doors by spring next year.

The decision was sparked by a review by paediatrician Dr Hilary Cass who found it was ‘not a safe or viable long-term option’ and that other mental health issues were ‘overshadowed’ by gender concerns when children were referred to the clinic.

GIDS’s closure will be replaced by regional centres at existing children’s hospitals which will provide more holistic care with ‘strong links to mental health services.’  

An ongoing review of Tavistock’s Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) clinic accused it of rushing children into life-altering treatment on puberty blockers.

An ongoing review of Tavistock’s Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) clinic accused it of rushing children into life-altering treatment on puberty blockers.

Gender dysphoria is used to describe a sense of unease a person may have because of a perceived ‘mismatch between their biological sex and their gender identity’, according to the NHS.   

The move is likely to be seen as a victory by some campaigners who have previously accused GIDS of rushing children onto lifechanging puberty blocking drugs.

In a letter to NHS England expressing concern over the use of these drugs, Dr Cass said: ‘Staff should maintain a broad clinical perspective in order to embed the care of children and young people with gender uncertainty within a broader child and adolescent health context.’ 

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