Devastated families call out council for tearing down a treehouse

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Families have been left devastated after council workers tore down their beloved neighbourhood treehouse.  

For the past three decades the treehouse on Irymple Ave in Melbourne‘s St Kilda has provided a ‘sense of community’ for children on the street.

That was until last week when a group of council workers showed up with hammers in hand after a neighbour complained the structure was unsafe. 

Mark Wiesmayr, who lives in the street, said parents and their children were left bawling as they watched as their treehouse was destroyed.

Families have been left devastated after council workers tore down their beloved neighbourhood treehouse

Families have been left devastated after council workers tore down their beloved neighbourhood treehouse

For the past three decades the treehouse on Irymple Ave in Melbourne's St Kilda has provided a 'sense of community' for children on the street

For the past three decades the treehouse on Irymple Ave in Melbourne’s St Kilda has provided a ‘sense of community’ for children on the street

He said the treehouse was torn down with ‘reckless, arrogant abandon’.

‘We are baffled by the cavalier attitude,’ Mr Wiesmayr told 3AW.

‘It was so arrogantly unprofessional, the way they did it.’

Port Phillip councillor and former mayor Dick Gross was left fuming after the treehouse was destroyed as his son Zac Gross had built it in 1990. 

‘I was shocked when I heard this noise and looked out my window to see it was already two thirds demolished,’ he told the Herald Sun.

He said the children had always ensured they were being safe by wearing helmets when they went up there. 

The ‘Happy Treehouse’ was built 30 years ago on a council-owned tree. 

Last week a group of council workers (pictured) showed up with hammers in hand after someone complained that the structure was unsafe

Last week a group of council workers (pictured) showed up with hammers in hand after someone complained that the structure was unsafe

Port Phillip Council chief executive Peter Smith said the treehouse and ladder were deemed unsafe by council officers

Port Phillip Council chief executive Peter Smith said the treehouse and ladder were deemed unsafe by council officers 

He said the nails had also damaged the council's 70-year-old London plane tree (pictured)

He said the nails had also damaged the council’s 70-year-old London plane tree (pictured)

Port Phillip Council chief executive Peter Smith said the treehouse and ladder were deemed unsafe by council officers. 

He said the nails had also damaged the council’s 70-year-old London plane tree.

The council has received 25 complaints about swings in the area in the past two months, which has sparked a debate about the use of play equipment on council trees.

The council currently investigating whether it will change its laws to allow residents to install structures, such as treehouses, onto council assets. 

Under local laws it is illegal to attach structures to council assets. 

Daily Mail Australia has reached out to Port Phillip Council for additional comment.

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