Dopey tourists are warned to get away from sparring bison that bring Yellowstone traffic to a halt

‘They will kill you!’ Dopey tourists are warned by other visitors as they try to film sparring bison while traffic is halted at Yellowstone National Park

  • Two bison were caught on tape locking horns on August 8, as two tourists got mighty close to the large bovines
  • Two women are heard on camera telling them to ‘back up’, warning them that ‘they will kill you’
  • ‘Holy crap, look at this power, wow!’ one of the two women also said in the video, referring to the fight. ‘My heart is thumping’
  • Bison have injured more people at the park than any other animal, with one or two incidents reported each year

A scary moment occurred when tourists were warned not to get too close to a fight between two bison near Yellowstone National Park, as traffic came to a full stop.

The brawl was caught on tape on August 8, and it began when two brown-furred bison locked horns in the middle of a road, prompting visitors to stop their vehicles to watch the showdown from the side. 

That’s when two elderly park visitors got out of their cars and walked just a couple of yards way form the brawl, eager to film it on their phones. 

Once they had gotten a little to close to the animals, two women are heard on camera telling them to ‘back up’, warning them that ‘they will kill you.’

‘Holy crap, look at this power, wow!’ one woman said in the video. ‘My heart is thumping,’ she added.

‘Oh here come a referee,’ one man can be heard commenting in the video, referring to a vehicle of park rangers responding to the incident. 

‘Look at the fur on the road,’ said another woman in the video, pointing out the amount of wool the two bison lost during the fight. 

Video of the bison fight was filmed by Cindy Shaffer, who is known for routinely capturing video from the park.

Footage of the incident was recorded by Cindy Shaffer, who wrote ‘What not to do in Yellowstone!!!’ as a caption, referring to the two tourists who were warned to back up from the bison fight.  

Two bison were recorded locking heads in the middle of a road near Yellowstone National Park on August 8, as people pulled their cars aside to observe the brawl

Two bison were recorded locking heads in the middle of a road near Yellowstone National Park on August 8, as people pulled their cars aside to observe the brawl

Two tourists got mighty close to the bovines, as others warned them to 'back up' and that the animals could 'kill you'

Two tourists got mighty close to the bovines, as others warned them to ‘back up’ and that the animals could ‘kill you’

Bison are one of the most unpredictable animals in Yellowstone and have injured more people at Yellowstone than any other animal, according to park officials. 

A 2018 study shows that 25 people (21 visitors and four employees) suffered bison-related injuries at Yellowstone between 2000 and 2015. The youngest victim was seven-years-old, while the oldest was age 68, and 13 of them were women.

Of the 21 visitors injured in the bison attacks, the study shows that 20 of them, or 80 percent in total, first approached the bison.

Another 12 people, accounting for 48 percent of all victims, saw the bison charge at them while they attempted to take photos of the beasts.

Most of the attacks took place during the park’s busiest time of the year in terms of visitation, between April and October.

An estimated range of 2,300 to 5,500 bison call the park home, according to the national park’s website. A male American bison can weigh up to 2,000 pounds.

On average, one or two people get injured from interacting with the species per year. They can also run three times faster than humans and up to 40 mph. 

Park regulations require visitors to remain more than 25 yards (23 meters) away from the bison. 

A sign in Yellowstone National Park warns visitors to not approach bison and other wildlife in the park. On average, one or two people get injured from interacting with the species per year

A sign in Yellowstone National Park warns visitors to not approach bison and other wildlife in the park. On average, one or two people get injured from interacting with the species per year

Bison often behave much like cattle, lumbering about and lazing in the sunshine. But when they get a mind to, they can run up to 40mph. (Above) American Bison (also known as Buffalo) pass by tourists at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming on June 1, 2011

Bison often behave much like cattle, lumbering about and lazing in the sunshine. But when they get a mind to, they can run up to 40mph. (Above) American Bison (also known as Buffalo) pass by tourists at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming on June 1, 2011

In June, a Colorado man was taken to the hospital after being charged with a bison. The 34-year-old man was on a stroll with his family near Yellowstone’s Old Faithful geyser, the park’s most popular site, when the bison gored him.

Park officials said the man was in stable condition and only suffered injuries to his arm.

Another attack happened in May when a 25-year-old woman from Ohio was gored by a bison after only being within 10 feet of the animal, park officials said. 

The woman came up close to the bison while walking by Black Sand Basin, just north of Old Faithful. She died after sustaining a puncture wound and other injuries.

A bison gored and killed a 25-year-old woman in Yellowstone National Park in Maay on the Black Sand Basin Boardwalk, while a man in July was attacked by a large bovine near Old Faithful

 A bison gored and killed a 25-year-old woman in Yellowstone National Park in Maay on the Black Sand Basin Boardwalk, while a man in July was attacked by a large bovine near Old Faithful

Tourists were just recently allowed to return to Yellowstone, after the park was ravaged by record breaking flooding that permanently diverted rivers, washed out roads and bridges, and left nearby towns submerged in torrents of flowing water.

Park officials initially expected the park to remain closed for months as they dealt with the damage, but then decided to open the park within two weeks of the floodwaters receding.

During the flooding and in the days after, park officials warned people to remain extra vigilant for wild animals that may have been displaced by the waters.

Tragic Accidents in Yellowstone

Bison attack and injure visitors at Yellowstone National Park more than other animal. According to a 2018 study, photography was the most common reason for bison charging at people between 2000 and 2015.

However, visitors at the park have suffered injuries, and also encountered death in other incidents, including: falling into geysers and being attacked by bears.

Wildlife in Yellowstone National Park are wild and can be dangerous when approached. When an animal is near a campsite, trail, boardwalk, parking lot, or in a developed area, it is advised to give it space and to stay at least 25 yards (23 meters) away from the animals.

Visitors are also warned of staying away from hot springs, with at least 22 people having died from related incidents in and around Yellowstone since 180, according to the park. 

1. MAN FALLS INTO HOT SPRING  

Colin Scott, 23, and of Portland, Oregon, had been looking for a place to ‘hot pot’ – a term for soaking in the park’s natural thermal features – in the summer of 2013. 

His sister Sable Scott said that she and her brother left the boardwalk near Pork Chop Geyser, according to a report on the incident.

While she filmed video with her phone, her brother reached down to check the water temperature but accidentally ‘slipped and fell’ into the scalding pool, she said.

Search and rescue rangers spotted his body in the pool on the day of the accident, but a lightning storm prevented their rescue efforts. By the following day, workers were unable to find any remains.

Deputies called the area where the accident happened – the Norris Geyser basin – ‘very dangerous’ with boiling acidic waters. Colin and Sable Scott left the boardwalk and walked several hundred feet up a hill.

The accident occurred in the hottest, oldest and most volatile area of Yellowstone, where boiling water flows just beneath a think rock crust.

Previous geological surveys found the water under the surface to measure more than 400 degrees. Water temperatures there can reach 199 degrees Fahrenheit – the boiling point for water at the park’s high elevation.

Scott is pictured (center) with family at his recent graduation

Scott is pictured (center) with family at his recent graduation

2. ELDERLY WOMAN GORED

Another woman, from California, was repeatedly gored by a wild bison at Yellowstone National Park in 2020. 

The 72-year-old – who has not been publicly identified – was attacked at the Bridge Bay Campground campsite after she approached the wild animal to try and snap a photograph. 

The woman was immediately tended to by park rangers before she was flown  to Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center via helicopter for further treatment. 

A press release from the National Park Service stated that the women came within 10 feet of the bison before she was gored. 

‘To be safe around bison, stay at least 25 yards away, move away if they approach, and run away or find cover if they charge,’ the park’s Senior Bison Biologist Chris Geremia is quoted as saying in an statement at the time.

3. MAN KILLED BY BEAR

A father-of-four was killed in a suspected grizzly bear attack after his remains were discovered by a search party near Yellowstone National Park in Montana in March of this year. 

The remains of Craig Clouatre, 40, of Livingston, were discovered by Park County Search and Rescue near Yellowstone National Park.

Clouatre went missing after hiking in the Six Mile Creek area of Paradise Valley, according to The Living Enterprise. The mountains in the area rise steeply above the Yellowstone River as it passes through the Paradise Valley. 

Clouatre had gone hiking with a friend but the pair split up, possibly to hunt for antlers.

Pictured: Craig Clouatre, 40, of Livingston, reportedly went missing after hiking in the Six Mile Creek area of Paradise Valley in March

Pictured: Craig Clouatre, 40, of Livingston, reportedly went missing after hiking in the Six Mile Creek area of Paradise Valley in March

Pictured: the location of the deadly grizzly attack that reportedly took Clouatre's life in relation to Yellowstone National Park

Pictured: the location of the deadly grizzly attack that reportedly took Clouatre’s life in relation to Yellowstone National Park

Since 2010, grizzlies in the Yellowstone region have killed at least eight people.

Among them was a backcountry guide killed by a bear last year along Yellowstone’s western border. Guide Charles ‘Carl’ Mock was killed in April after being mauled by a 400-plus pound male grizzly while fishing alone at a favorite spot on Montana´s Madison River, where it spills out of the park.

Grizzlies are protected under federal law outside Alaska. Elected officials in the Yellowstone region are pushing to lift protections and allow grizzly hunting.

The Yellowstone region spanning portions of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming has more than 700 bears. 

4. WOMAN JUMPS INTO HOT SPRING TO SAVE PET

Laiha Slayton, 20, was horrifically burned after jumping into a 190-degree Yellowstone geyser to try and save her puppy – Shih Tzu – in October 2021. 

She was initially put in a medically-induced coma at an Idaho hospital right after the October 5 incident. She underwent 18 surgeries and was finally released from the hospital in February 2022.

Laiha and her father, Woodrow, briefly stopped for a visit at Yellowstone National Park and had parked 20-30 yards away from Maiden’s Grave Spring, next to the Firehole River, according to the victim’s sister – Kamilla.

The family’s two Shih Tzus, Rusty and Chevy, had gotten out of the car and were wandering around nearby while Slayton was looking for their leashes in the car.

Rusty suddenly got his foot burned by a small leak from the geyser that flows into the river. The dog then panicked and fell in to the spring while Woodrow was trying to gain control of Chevy.

Laiha jumped in to the thermal spring – which can reach temperatures of 190-degree Fahrenheit – in a bid to rescue her one-year-old puppy, and then had to be rescued herself by her father.

Woodrow, 48, pulled his daughter out of the scalding water after just eight seconds.

Woodrow — although injured — drove Laiha to West Yellowstone, Montana, to seek help, from where she was flown by helicopter to the burn unit at Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls.

As a result from the fall, Laiha’s body was 90 percent covered with severe burns – half of which are third-degree, with the remainder second-degree. 

Laiha Slayton was scalded in a Yellowstone geyser in October of last year, and suffered second and third-degree burns to 90 percent of her body

Laiha Slayton was scalded in a Yellowstone geyser in October of last year, and suffered second and third-degree burns to 90 percent of her body 

Rusty, the Shih Tzu puppy, was taken to a veterinarian but did not survive from its wounds

Rusty, the Shih Tzu puppy, was taken to a veterinarian but did not survive from its wounds

Maiden's Grave Hot Spring flowing into the Firehole River in Yellowstone National Park, where Laiha and her dog reportedly fell into and suffered burns on October 5th

Maiden’s Grave Hot Spring flowing into the Firehole River in Yellowstone National Park, where Laiha and her dog reportedly fell into and suffered burns on October 5th

The incident happened at Maiden's Grave Spring, north of the famous Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming

The incident happened at Maiden’s Grave Spring, north of the famous Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming 

Laiha (pictured) was taken to hospital in Idaho by helicopter after her father drove her to West Yellowstone, Montana, to seek help

Laiha (pictured) was taken to hospital in Idaho by helicopter after her father drove her to West Yellowstone, Montana, to seek help

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