Dramatic moment massive tidal wave sweeps away vehicles in China

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This is the terrifying moment a huge high-tide wave crashed onto a road with bustling traffic in China as the gushing water swept away a dozen vehicles.

Viral footage shows the massive tidal wave rushing onto the busy road near the Qiantang River in eastern Chinese city Hangzhou on Sunday, swallowing a queue of cars within seconds.

Seven vehicles were damaged due to the extreme weather, according to local authorities. No casualties were reported.

Viral footage shows the massive tidal wave rushing onto the busy road near the Qiantang River in eastern Chinese city Hangzhou on Sunday, swallowing a queue of cars within seconds

Viral footage shows the massive tidal wave rushing onto the busy road near the Qiantang River in eastern Chinese city Hangzhou on Sunday, swallowing a queue of cars within seconds

The incident was caused by a tidal bore, a rare natural phenomenon that occurs when the leading edge of the incoming tide forms a wave of water that pushes into a narrow waterway

The incident was caused by a tidal bore, a rare natural phenomenon that occurs when the leading edge of the incoming tide forms a wave of water that pushes into a narrow waterway

The incident was caused by a tidal bore, a rare natural phenomenon that occurs when the leading edge of the incoming tide forms a wave of water that pushes into a narrow waterway.

The tidal bores occurring in Hangzhou’s Qiantang River is said to be the largest of their kind in the world, with tides reaching up to 30 feet and going as fast as 40 km/h (about 25 mph), according to reports.

The roar of the tidal wave can be heard for hours before it bores up the river, and the river’s water stays risen for several hours after the bore passes.

Tidal bores can be seen in several locations around the world, including the Britain’s longest river, the Severn, but the Qiantang bore is the largest. 

The tidal bores occurring in Hangzhou¿s Qiantang River is said to be the largest of their kind in the world, with tides reaching up to 30 feet and going as fast as 40 km/h (about 25 mph)

The tidal bores occurring in Hangzhou’s Qiantang River is said to be the largest of their kind in the world, with tides reaching up to 30 feet and going as fast as 40 km/h (about 25 mph)

Tidal bores can be seen in several locations around the world, including the Britain's longest river, the Severn, but the Qiantang bore is the largest. The river has attracted hundreds of thousands of tide-watchers every autumn, hoping to get a glimpse of the dramatic scene

Tidal bores can be seen in several locations around the world, including the Britain’s longest river, the Severn, but the Qiantang bore is the largest. The river has attracted hundreds of thousands of tide-watchers every autumn, hoping to get a glimpse of the dramatic scene

The river has attracted hundreds of thousands of tide-watchers every autumn, hoping to get a glimpse of the dramatic scene.

A powerful tidal bore was caught on camera over the weekend after it hit a road along the riverbank and swept away a dozen cars.

The gushing river water quickly swallowed the busy street, causing huge splashes.

This file photo shows visitors runningaway as waves caused by a tidal bore surge past a barrier on the banks of Qiantang River, in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China on August 13, 2014

This file photo shows visitors runningaway as waves caused by a tidal bore surge past a barrier on the banks of Qiantang River, in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province, China on August 13, 2014

Chinese weather authorities today have warned visitors who are planning to watch the tidal bores, saying they could be the largest ones in the past three years. Visitors gather to watch the Qiantang River tidal bore on the bank of the Qiantang River on September 26, 2018

Chinese weather authorities today have warned visitors who are planning to watch the tidal bores, saying they could be the largest ones in the past three years. Visitors gather to watch the Qiantang River tidal bore on the bank of the Qiantang River on September 26, 2018

Seven vehicles were damaged during the incident, reported Chinese media, citing the local traffic police. No injuries or casualties were recorded.

Chinese weather authorities today have warned visitors who are planning to watch the tidal bores, saying they could be the largest ones in the past three years. 

In August 2013, the tidal bore turned out stronger than expected due to Typhoon Trami, reaching more than twice its usual height as it broke on the flood barrier, sweeping it and injuring numerous spectators.

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