Driver flashes red and blue emergency lights at car in intimidation attempt


Driver’s bizarre attempt to intimidate other cars by flashing red and blue lights lands them in hot water as cops reveal the huge punishment they can be hit with just by keeping them in their vehicle

  • A Toyota Corolla flashed red and blue lights after they were beeped at in traffic
  • A car with a dashcam caught the illegal use of the lights last month in Sydney
  • Penalties for impersonating an officer in NSW range from two to seven years jail
  • One social media punter joked about people using older police cars with lights

A driver’s cheeky joke to intimidate other cars by flashing red and blue lights at them will likely land them in big trouble after cops revealed the massive punishment they could face. 

Dasham footage captured the Toyota Corolla driving in the left lane, during Sydney‘s peak hour, before it veered into the right lane.

The car with the camera was driving fast in the right lane before the Corolla pulled out in front, forcing the car behind to slam on the brakes. 

The dashcam driver used the horn against the offending lane changer, before the silver hatchback slowed down and began flashing red and blue police lights from the back window. 

After the bizarre stunt, the Corolla then sped off away from the dashcam driver.

The dashcam driver used the horn against the offending lane changer, before the silver hatchback (pictured) slowed down and flashed siren lights from the back window

The dashcam driver used the horn against the offending lane changer, before the silver hatchback (pictured) slowed down and flashed siren lights from the back window

The footage was uploaded to the YouTube channel Scott’s Car Cameras, that showcases ‘crazy driving from Australia And New Zealand’.

Social media comments lit up about the footage, hoping the driver with the ‘fake lights’ would be reported to police. 

But some debate ensued about it being a real police car, saying they had seen police in Sydney ‘driving Corollas exactly like that, so it may not be fake after all’. 

One social media commenter said: 'No police department would hang on to their cars for that long'

One social media commenter said: ‘No police department would hang on to their cars for that long’

Another social media user rebuffed the comment saying they had never seen an unmarked police car with that style of light ‘so fairly confident it’s fake’.

The vison lead some punters to look up the number plates of the car, discovering the 2018 age of the vehicle. 

‘No police department would hang on to their cars for that long,’ they said, while another joked about there being ‘plenty of older police vehicles on Australian roads’. 

Blue and red flashing lights are only allowed on emergency vehicles, such as police and ambulance services, a NSW vehicle standards report said.

‘The use of blue, or blue and red flashing lights is intended to advise other road users that the vehicle displaying them is responding to an emergency situation,’ it said.

‘They must only be used when the vehicle is being used for police operational functions or urgent purposes arising from an accident, fire or other emergency.’ 

Red flashing lights are permitted only on Red Cross and other rescue vehicles.

Amber or yellow blinking lights warn of obstructions to the free flow of traffic on NSW roads, like milk trucks, towing vehicles and buses taking kids to school. 

Impersonating a police officer can lead to imprisonment, ranging from two to seven years in jail, according to the NSW Crime Act. 

 The social media channel that uploaded the video said it shows dashcam footage of ‘bad driving, the illegal the dangerous and the stupid acts on the roads’.

Source

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