Drunk naked son, 54, ‘battered his elderly father to death with a bottle of Bollinger’

Drunk naked son, 54, ‘battered his elderly father to death with a bottle of Bollinger then told police, “I hate French champagne”‘

  • A drunk son allegedly battered his father to death with a bottle of champagne
  • The Old Bailey heard that Deekan Vig, 54, had been on a drinking binge at home
  • Police officers found him lying naked on a pile of 100 bottles of champagne 
  • They discovered the body of his father Arjan Singh Vig, 86, at the family’s house 

A drunken son battered his father to death with a bottle of Bollinger before telling police ‘I hate French champagne,’ a court heard.

Police found Deekan Vig, 54, lying naked and surrounded by 100 bottles of champagne next to his dead father, Arjan Singh Vig, 86, following a whiskey binge in October 2021 at their home in Southgate, north London, the Old Bailey heard.

Vig told officers when the arrived at the scene: ‘You’re too late. He’s been dead for an hour’.

On his way to the police station Deekan said: ‘I killed my Dad.’

(Stock Image) Deekan Vig, 54, allegedly beat his father to death with a bottle of Bollinger champagne

(Stock Image) Deekan Vig, 54, allegedly beat his father to death with a bottle of Bollinger champagne

He added: ‘I hit him over the head with a f***ing bloody bottle of Bollinger champagne.’

‘Why did I kill my Dad? 

‘I hit him on the head. I f***ing hit him with a bottle of f***ing champagne. F***ing champagne… I hate French champagne.’

Prosecutor Deanna Heer told jurors: ‘On the evening of Saturday 30th October 2021 Arjan Singh Vig and he was beaten to death in his own home.

‘He was attacked with a heavy blunt weapon, most likely a full bottle of champagne, and he was beaten repeatedly to the face and to the head to the extent that he suffered extensive and severe traumatic injuries.

‘His skull was broken, he suffered extensive fractures of the facial bones and his brain was damaged so badly that death would have been swift, if not instantaneous.

‘At the time of his death Arjan Singh Vig was 86 years old. The person who killed him was his son, the defendant Deekan Singh Vig, and at the time of the incident he was 53 years of age.

‘The defendant accepts that he killed his father, that he did so unlawfully and that his father had done nothing to justify such a violent attack upon him but, the defendant says, he did not intend to kill his father or even to cause him really serious harm.’

On the day of the killing, Deekan’s parents attended an event at the local Sikh temple at 2pm.

(Stock Image) Deekan Vig admitted manslaughter but denied murder at The Old Bailey

(Stock Image) Deekan Vig admitted manslaughter but denied murder at The Old Bailey 

They told their son they would be back at 4:30pm but they stayed longer than expected catching up with friends and did not return until 5:30pm.

When they returned Deekan told them they were late and went to his bedroom.

At around 9pm he started causing a loud banging from his room and when his mother Damanjit Veer, 85, heard him vomiting in his bedroom she assumed he had some kind of food poisoning.

She heard Arjan repeatedly say to Deekan: ‘Calm down. You’re a good man.’

Ms Heer told the court: ‘It was at this point that she heard the defendant say that he had drunk half a bottle of whisky. He also said he had drunk a quarter of a bottle the night before.

‘Now that was a surprise to her; as far as she was concerned he never drank… She says that he didn’t sound himself at this point.’

Police were called to find the house in silence.

Ms Heer said: ‘PC Francis tried to open the door to the defendant’s room but it was firmly shut… He was able to see that there was blood on the wall and immediately radioed for assistance and an ambulance unit and asked for assistance.

‘He shouted out for anyone behind the door to open the door, identifying himself as a police officer.

‘There was no reply. He continued to try to push the door open and managed to create a three to four inch gap but he could feel a heavy weight pushing against the other side of the door.

‘He was able to see on the floor a head, it was the deceased’s head, Arjan’s, lying against the door. It was covered in blood and brain matter.

‘Eventually, the defendant who was inside began to reply. He said he could not help the police to open the door.

‘He said he was drunk. He said, “You’re too late. He’s been dead for an hour.” He was abusive and swearing.’

Officers said it was obvious on arrival that Arjan Singh Vig was dead.

‘The defendant was lying on the floor. He was naked. The room was messy with champagne bottles scattered around the room.’

Deekan was struck round the face and taser before being handcuffed and clothed.

‘He continued to be abusive, telling the police repeatedly to “f*ck off”, calling them “pigs” and telling them they did not know how to do their jobs.

Describing the crime scene, Ms Heer said: ‘The defendant’s bedroom did not appear to be being used to sleep in as there were about 100 bottles of champagne on the bed with clothing piled on top of them.

‘There were also about 10 Amazon delivery boxes in the room, each of which contained three or four bottles of whisky. There was an empty bottle of Talisker whisky by the bed.

‘Beside his [Arjan’s] body, two bottles of champagne were found which appeared to have a significant amount of blood on them.

‘One was a bottle of Veuve Cliquot, the other a bottle of Bollinger. The Veuve Cliquot bottle, when examined, was found to have a number of hairs adhering in the blood.’

Deekan lived with his parents at Chelmsford Road in Southgate, north London in a four-bedroom detached house which had been the family home for 40 years.

Originally from Uganda, Deekan and his family were expelled by Idi Amin like others of Asian origin were at the time. He came to the UK when he was about five.

His father, Arjan Vig was a qualified accountant who set up business as a shopkeeper in London. His mother, Damanjit, was a zoologist and worked as a teacher.

His younger sister, Rippan Vig, did well academically, forged a successful career as a lawyer and married.

However, Ms Heer told jurors: ‘it seems that the defendant had not achieved what he wanted in life.’

She said: ‘Looking back, his sister feels that, growing up, the defendant was a bit different.

‘As a child he had been hyperactive, disruptive and impulsive. There had been some suggestion that he should go to a special school but his father refused.

‘He developed obsessions and compulsive behaviours. She describes him biting his nails, shaking his leg when he was sitting down, or touching his face and nose in a particular order.

‘On the other hand, he was well read, he had a particular aptitude for some subjects, he was very good at physics, maths and astronomy, but he was never able to translate that ability into a practical career.

‘His sister felt that he was frustrated and that his difficulties in completing practical tasks affected his self-esteem.’

Deekan took various jobs but most of them were short-lived, including working as a delivery driver. At the time of the killing he was not in work and was in receipt of state benefits.

Ms Heer added: ‘He didn’t have girlfriends growing up and had never married… His social life was limited. He would help his parents around the house, fixing things and doing odd jobs and, for a time, he helped his father in the family business. He spent time on his computer.’

Both his mother and sister describe his relationship with his father as being ‘good’ with Deekan sticking up for him and being patient with him.

Deekan’s mother described the defendant as having a short temper but he had never previously hurt his father but he would kick out at things in rage.

His sister believed he had become more tense and edgy due to the effects of the lockdown.

Ms Heer said: ‘In fact, it seems that the defendant had developed a taste for alcohol.’

Deekan, of Southgate, accepts that he killed his father and has admitted manslaughter.

But he denies murder, claiming he did not intend to kill his father or cause him really serious bodily injury.

The trial continues.

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Drunk naked son, 54, ‘battered his elderly father to death with a bottle of Bollinger’

Drunk naked son, 54, ‘battered his elderly father to death with a bottle of Bollinger then told police, “I hate French champagne”‘

  • A drunk son allegedly battered his father to death with a bottle of champagne
  • The Old Bailey heard that Deekan Vig, 54, had been on a drinking binge at home
  • Police officers found him lying naked on a pile of 100 bottles of champagne 
  • They discovered the body of his father Arjan Singh Vig, 86, at the family’s house 

A drunken son battered his father to death with a bottle of Bollinger before telling police ‘I hate French champagne,’ a court heard.

Police found Deekan Vig, 54, lying naked and surrounded by 100 bottles of champagne next to his dead father, Arjan Singh Vig, 86, following a whiskey binge in October 2021 at their home in Southgate, north London, the Old Bailey heard.

Vig told officers when the arrived at the scene: ‘You’re too late. He’s been dead for an hour’.

On his way to the police station Deekan said: ‘I killed my Dad.’

(Stock Image) Deekan Vig, 54, allegedly beat his father to death with a bottle of Bollinger champagne

(Stock Image) Deekan Vig, 54, allegedly beat his father to death with a bottle of Bollinger champagne

He added: ‘I hit him over the head with a f***ing bloody bottle of Bollinger champagne.’

‘Why did I kill my Dad? 

‘I hit him on the head. I f***ing hit him with a bottle of f***ing champagne. F***ing champagne… I hate French champagne.’

Prosecutor Deanna Heer told jurors: ‘On the evening of Saturday 30th October 2021 Arjan Singh Vig and he was beaten to death in his own home.

‘He was attacked with a heavy blunt weapon, most likely a full bottle of champagne, and he was beaten repeatedly to the face and to the head to the extent that he suffered extensive and severe traumatic injuries.

‘His skull was broken, he suffered extensive fractures of the facial bones and his brain was damaged so badly that death would have been swift, if not instantaneous.

‘At the time of his death Arjan Singh Vig was 86 years old. The person who killed him was his son, the defendant Deekan Singh Vig, and at the time of the incident he was 53 years of age.

‘The defendant accepts that he killed his father, that he did so unlawfully and that his father had done nothing to justify such a violent attack upon him but, the defendant says, he did not intend to kill his father or even to cause him really serious harm.’

On the day of the killing, Deekan’s parents attended an event at the local Sikh temple at 2pm.

(Stock Image) Deekan Vig admitted manslaughter but denied murder at The Old Bailey

(Stock Image) Deekan Vig admitted manslaughter but denied murder at The Old Bailey 

They told their son they would be back at 4:30pm but they stayed longer than expected catching up with friends and did not return until 5:30pm.

When they returned Deekan told them they were late and went to his bedroom.

At around 9pm he started causing a loud banging from his room and when his mother Damanjit Veer, 85, heard him vomiting in his bedroom she assumed he had some kind of food poisoning.

She heard Arjan repeatedly say to Deekan: ‘Calm down. You’re a good man.’

Ms Heer told the court: ‘It was at this point that she heard the defendant say that he had drunk half a bottle of whisky. He also said he had drunk a quarter of a bottle the night before.

‘Now that was a surprise to her; as far as she was concerned he never drank… She says that he didn’t sound himself at this point.’

Police were called to find the house in silence.

Ms Heer said: ‘PC Francis tried to open the door to the defendant’s room but it was firmly shut… He was able to see that there was blood on the wall and immediately radioed for assistance and an ambulance unit and asked for assistance.

‘He shouted out for anyone behind the door to open the door, identifying himself as a police officer.

‘There was no reply. He continued to try to push the door open and managed to create a three to four inch gap but he could feel a heavy weight pushing against the other side of the door.

‘He was able to see on the floor a head, it was the deceased’s head, Arjan’s, lying against the door. It was covered in blood and brain matter.

‘Eventually, the defendant who was inside began to reply. He said he could not help the police to open the door.

‘He said he was drunk. He said, “You’re too late. He’s been dead for an hour.” He was abusive and swearing.’

Officers said it was obvious on arrival that Arjan Singh Vig was dead.

‘The defendant was lying on the floor. He was naked. The room was messy with champagne bottles scattered around the room.’

Deekan was struck round the face and taser before being handcuffed and clothed.

‘He continued to be abusive, telling the police repeatedly to “f*ck off”, calling them “pigs” and telling them they did not know how to do their jobs.

Describing the crime scene, Ms Heer said: ‘The defendant’s bedroom did not appear to be being used to sleep in as there were about 100 bottles of champagne on the bed with clothing piled on top of them.

‘There were also about 10 Amazon delivery boxes in the room, each of which contained three or four bottles of whisky. There was an empty bottle of Talisker whisky by the bed.

‘Beside his [Arjan’s] body, two bottles of champagne were found which appeared to have a significant amount of blood on them.

‘One was a bottle of Veuve Cliquot, the other a bottle of Bollinger. The Veuve Cliquot bottle, when examined, was found to have a number of hairs adhering in the blood.’

Deekan lived with his parents at Chelmsford Road in Southgate, north London in a four-bedroom detached house which had been the family home for 40 years.

Originally from Uganda, Deekan and his family were expelled by Idi Amin like others of Asian origin were at the time. He came to the UK when he was about five.

His father, Arjan Vig was a qualified accountant who set up business as a shopkeeper in London. His mother, Damanjit, was a zoologist and worked as a teacher.

His younger sister, Rippan Vig, did well academically, forged a successful career as a lawyer and married.

However, Ms Heer told jurors: ‘it seems that the defendant had not achieved what he wanted in life.’

She said: ‘Looking back, his sister feels that, growing up, the defendant was a bit different.

‘As a child he had been hyperactive, disruptive and impulsive. There had been some suggestion that he should go to a special school but his father refused.

‘He developed obsessions and compulsive behaviours. She describes him biting his nails, shaking his leg when he was sitting down, or touching his face and nose in a particular order.

‘On the other hand, he was well read, he had a particular aptitude for some subjects, he was very good at physics, maths and astronomy, but he was never able to translate that ability into a practical career.

‘His sister felt that he was frustrated and that his difficulties in completing practical tasks affected his self-esteem.’

Deekan took various jobs but most of them were short-lived, including working as a delivery driver. At the time of the killing he was not in work and was in receipt of state benefits.

Ms Heer added: ‘He didn’t have girlfriends growing up and had never married… His social life was limited. He would help his parents around the house, fixing things and doing odd jobs and, for a time, he helped his father in the family business. He spent time on his computer.’

Both his mother and sister describe his relationship with his father as being ‘good’ with Deekan sticking up for him and being patient with him.

Deekan’s mother described the defendant as having a short temper but he had never previously hurt his father but he would kick out at things in rage.

His sister believed he had become more tense and edgy due to the effects of the lockdown.

Ms Heer said: ‘In fact, it seems that the defendant had developed a taste for alcohol.’

Deekan, of Southgate, accepts that he killed his father and has admitted manslaughter.

But he denies murder, claiming he did not intend to kill his father or cause him really serious bodily injury.

The trial continues.

Source

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