E-scooter deaths TRIPLE in a year: 12 people killed over 12 month period

E-scooter deaths TRIPLE in a year: 12 people are killed on electric two-wheelers over 12 month period – with 28% rise in crashes from 1,349 to 978

  • There were 12 deaths from e-scooter accidents in the year up to June 2022
  • This compares to four deaths the year before, new Government figures show
  • There were some 1,349 crashes compared to just 978 in the previous 12 months 
  • Councillors say they are an ‘underlying problem’ which are not being addressed

The number of deaths from e-scooter accidents has tripled in a year while crashes have also risen by 28 per cent over a 12 month period.

New Government data published today shows that in the year to June there were 12 deaths involving e-scooters and 1,349 crashes.

This compares to four deaths the year before as well as 978 crashes – a significantly less number. Some 11 of the 12 deaths were e-scooter users while one was a pedestrian. 

In 2019, Channel 4 and YouTube star Emily Hartridge was killed in what was believed to be Britain’s first fatal electric scooter accident.

The number of deaths from e-scooter accidents has tripled in a year with crashes also rising 28 per cent over the 12 month period

The number of deaths from e-scooter accidents has tripled in a year with crashes also rising 28 per cent over the 12 month period

In 2019, Channel 4 and YouTube star Emily Hartridge (pictured) was killed in what was believed to be Britain's first fatal electric scooter accident

In 2019, Channel 4 and YouTube star Emily Hartridge (pictured) was killed in what was believed to be Britain’s first fatal electric scooter accident 

The 35-year-old was involved in a collision with a lorry while riding an e-scooter near her home in Battersea, south London. 

In August, a woman in Hull was left with a fractured skull after being hit by an e-scooter. 

She had been on a bike going down a one-way street at around 6am and was hit by the e-scooter rider coming the other way.

The woman was left with fractures in three parts of her skull, prompting fury from residents and councillors alike.

E-scooter deaths TRIPLE in a year 

New Government data published today showed e-scooter accidents and deaths are rising.

  • There were 12 deaths involving e-scooters – up from four the year before.
  • There were 1,349 e-scooter crashes – up 28 per cent from 978.
  • There were 1,437 casualties in e-scooter crashes – up from 1,033.
  • Of all the crashes, 346 involved one e-scooter with no other vehicles involved – up from 200. 

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East Yorkshire councillor Viv Padden recalled speaking to her after the incident which she could not remember until she saw video footage. He said that although she felt very ‘vulnerable and weak’ she believed she was lucky to even be speaking to him.

The Lib Dem councillor told MailOnline that having e-scooters on the roads has ‘opened a can of worms’.

‘It’s an underlying problem that has not been addressed in its full capacity,’ he said. 

‘Every time I see anybody who recognises me they tell me “get these things off the road, they are a hazard”.

He is becoming increasingly frustrated at the problem not being addressed by police. Cllr Padden, whose wife was knocked over by an e-scooter, is urging residents to report ‘illegal e-scooters’ to Crimestoppers to help eradicate them.

E-scooters were also banned from TfL in December, 2021, after one exploded on a packed tube.

Firefighters extinguished the blaze at Parsons Green underground station, with one passenger suffering smoke inhalation.

It was one of many close calls which caused TfL to launch an urgent review, supported by evidence from the Brigade’s experts.

Within these astonishing new figures today, 346 of the crashes included only one e-scooter with no other vehicles involved – a sharp rise from 200 the year before.

There were also 1,437 injuries from the e-scooter crashes compared to 1,033 in the year ending June 2021.

Of all the casualties, 1,095 were e-scooter users compared to 811 in the year before. And 429 were seriously injured.

In July, 80-year-old grandmother Sarah Carter was left with a broken wrist, a cracked jaw and cheekbone after she was knocked to the ground by an e-scooter.

Sarah Carter, 80, suffered a broken wrist, a cracked cheekbone and jaw after being struck by an e-scooter in Canterbury, Kent

Sarah Carter, 80, suffered a broken wrist, a cracked cheekbone and jaw after being struck by an e-scooter in Canterbury, Kent

E-scooters were also banned from TfL in December, 2021, after one exploded on a packed tube

E-scooters were also banned from TfL in December, 2021, after one exploded on a packed tube 

She labelled the e-scooters ‘lethal’ and branded the council ‘irresponsible’ for the lack of infrastructure put in place. 

After her accident, she said: ‘Another elderly person could have quite easily been even more seriously injured or even killed.’ 

Transport councillor for Kent County Council David Brazier told MailOnline: ‘E-scooters are not yet a mature technology and works needs to be done to ensure that they can be used responsibly and safely, not causing alarm or injury to other member of the public. 

‘Legislation is required to make the use of e-scooters better regulated.’ 

It comes after Kent axed e-scooters from its road after the council rejected an offer from the Department for Transport to continue a trial until May 2024.

From December 1 there will be no legally ridden e-scooters on Kent’s streets, as they are only permitted on public highways as part of government-approved trials. 

In July, a reckless e-scooter rider ploughed straight into a 4×4 car after speeding through a junction without looking in Watford.

He narrowly avoided a serious injury and even death when he rammed straight into the car. 

And more recently, on October 26, a woman in her 20s sustained ‘life-threatening’ injuries after a car crashed into an e-scooter in Bristol.

The Government figures show that Avon and Somerset police have had the third most reports of casualties from crashes involving e-scooters outside of London. 

There were 87 reports in the year up to June, only topped by the 463 reports to the Met Police and the 91 made to Nottinghamshire police. 

Most of the casualties – some 276 – come from men aged between ten and 19. 

What are the laws on e-scooters? 

Renting an e-scooter is the only way to legally ride the vehicle on some public roads or in other public place at the moment.

But the controversial vehicles could be approved for use across the UK following a trial period. Currently, 10 London boroughs are taking part in the scheme with three providers to test how e-scooters work on the capital’s roads.

Riding e-scooters on the pavement however is banned, and riders must be 18 or over and have a full or provisional driving licence to rent one.

It is also illegal to use privately owned e-scooters or other powered transporters on public roads.

Relevant laws on e-scooter use include:

On public roads, anyone using a privately owned e-scooter or other powered transporter is likely to be committing at least one of a number of offences such as driving a motor vehicle with no insurance. You could be liable for a fixed penalty of £300 and six points on your driving licence

On pavements, it is generally an offence to drive a motor vehicle, and this applies at all times to e-scooters and powered transporters

E-scooters and powered transporters may be used on private land with permission from the landowner or occupier

E-scooters rented from the TfL scheme will be permitted to ride on London’s public roads and cycle infrastructure in participating boroughs.

These boroughs will designate no-go areas where e-scooters cannot be ridden and will come to a safe stop, as well as go-slow areas, where the speed of e-scooters will be reduced to 8mph

Source: TfL 

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