Egg shortage could last until next SUMMER, after M&S and Morrisons begin rationing customers

Easter without eggs: Egg shortage could last until next SUMMER, farmers warn after M&S and Morrisons join Tesco, Asda and Lidl in rationing customers

  • Egg shortages could carry on into next summer National Farmers’ Union warns
  • M&S and Morrisons have joined other supermarkets in rationing customers
  • Farmers have been dealing with bird flu, inflation and spiraling energy costs

Egg shortages could extend past Easter into next summer as M&S and Morrisons join Tesco, Asda and Lidl in rationing the sale of boxes in its stores.

Earlier this month an industry body warned rationing would continue into the new year, as farmers deal with bird flu, inflation and soaring energy costs.

Now the National Farmers’ Union has warned the egg shortages on supermarket shelves could last until well into next summer unless supply chain issues are solved.

It comes as nearly all major supermarkets are now rationing eggs as M&S and Morrisons confirmed customers are limited to two boxes each.

A spokesperson for Morrisons said the decision was made following ‘unprecedented demand’ at the end of last week. 

Egg shortages could extend into next summer as farmers deal with bird flu, inflation and soaring energy costs

Egg shortages could extend into next summer as farmers deal with bird flu, inflation and soaring energy costs

M&S and Morrisons have joined Tesco (pictured), Asda and Lidl in rationing the sale of boxes in its stores

M&S and Morrisons have joined Tesco (pictured), Asda and Lidl in rationing the sale of boxes in its stores

Supplies have been hit by a bird flu epidemic which has seen a cull of many egg-laying hens, and the fact many farmers have turned their back on the industry amid soaring costs of feed and energy.

Industry leaders have accused supermarkets of failing to pay a fair price for eggs.

They argue that only a fraction of a 35 per cent increase in average prices charged by the stores in the past year has been passed back to producers.

Supermarkets have raised the price of a dozen eggs by more than 50p on average since the beginning of the year, according to the British Free Range Egg Producers Association. 

While farmers have only received a price increase of just 18p.

Industry leaders have accused supermarkets of failing to pay a fair price for eggs - and said it is one of the main reasons of the shortages

Industry leaders have accused supermarkets of failing to pay a fair price for eggs – and said it is one of the main reasons of the shortages

Supermarkets have raised the price of a dozen eggs by more than 50p on average since the beginning of the year, while farmers have only received a price increase of just 18p

Supermarkets have raised the price of a dozen eggs by more than 50p on average since the beginning of the year, while farmers have only received a price increase of just 18p

David Exwood, of the NFU, told The Telegraph that the issues surrounding the fairness of the supply chain are just the ‘tip of the iceberg’ for British producers.

He said: ‘It is common for farmers to have shouldered 20 per cent increases in energy and feed and many are producing at a loss. Inflation for farming will carry on well into next year – it is really serious.

‘Farmers are very familiar with uncertainty, but if they don’t have confidence in the future then many will cease production.’

Speaking on the matter previously, a Defra spokesperson said: ‘We understand the difficulties that rising costs combined with the bird flu outbreak are causing for farmers and we are working with industry to monitor the egg market.

‘The UK’s food supply chain is resilient – there are 38 million laying hens across the country and we are not expecting any significant impact to the overall supply.’

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