Einstein’s handwritten maths notes tipped to fetch £50,000 at auction next week

Einstein’s handwritten maths notes tipped to fetch £50,000 at auction next week

  • A sheet on Einstein’s notes covered in calculations is tipped to sell for £50,000
  • Manuscript from October 1931 was months after he had to flee Nazi Germany
  • Notes accompanied by letter from his wife, Elsa, to a friend describing America 

A sheet of paper covered in the mathematics notes of renowned physicist Albert Einstein is tipped to sell for £50,000.

The genius mathematician wrote down a series of scientific equations in ink and pencil on the plain paper.

He crossed out small sections of the draft manuscript, showing even the finest minds make the odd mistake.

Einstein, who won the Nobel prize for physics in 1921, also made annotations explaining what he intended to achieve with his formulas.

He wrote the letter in October 1933, just months after he renounced his German citizenship and was forced to flee Nazi Germany.

A sheet of renowned physicist Albert Einstein's (pictured) mathematics notes covered in calculations is tipped to sell for £50,000

A sheet of renowned physicist Albert Einstein’s (pictured) mathematics notes covered in calculations is tipped to sell for £50,000

The genius mathematician wrote down a series of scientific equations in ink and pencil on the plain paper

The genius mathematician wrote down a series of scientific equations in ink and pencil on the plain paper

Tragically, the exiled scientist signed off with the mournful message: ‘Albert Einstein: From the graveyard of buried hopes’.

The notes are accompanied by a letter from his wife, Elsa Einstein, to a friend describing the couple’s new life in America, where Einstein took up a position at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.

The documents are being sold at International Autograph Auctions in Malaga, Spain.

Richard Davie, specialist at the auctioneers, said: ‘Whilst Einstein clearly created many such pages of scientific formulae during his career, they remain highly sought after by collectors, and signed examples are of exceptional rarity.

‘Furthermore, the present example is greatly enhanced by both Einstein’s handwritten observations, reflecting on the possibility of what he wished to have achieved with his calculations, and the fine accompanying letter of provenance from Elsa Einstein.

‘His note, ‘from the graveyard of buried hopes’, suggest he may have abandoned whatever problem he was working on.

‘It also resonates with the fact he had just been forced to flee Germany. Due to his Jewish heritage, he would never have survived Hitler’s regime.

‘The fact they were writing to Professor Arthur de Groodt and his wife Juliette Adant, who helped them through this period of transition, is also noteworthy’.

The notes are accompanied by a letter (pictured) from his wife, Elsa Einstein, to a friend describing the couple's new life in America

The notes are accompanied by a letter (pictured) from his wife, Elsa Einstein, to a friend describing the couple’s new life in America

Sculpture of Albert Einstein at Questacon, the National Science and Technology Centre, Canberra, Australia

Sculpture of Albert Einstein at Questacon, the National Science and Technology Centre, Canberra, Australia

In March 1933 Albert and Elsa Einstein returned to Europe from America and learned that Hitler had seized power and that the Gestapo had raided their Berlin apartment, confiscating several of their possessions.

Landing in Antwerp, Belgium, Albert Einstein immediately visited the German consulate and surrendered his passport, formally renouncing his German citizenship.

On October 3 1933, Einstein delivered a speech on the importance of academic freedom before a packed audience at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

Four days later he returned to America with his wife and took up a position at the Institute for Advanced Study, known as a refuge for scientists fleeing Nazi Germany.

Einstein died in 1955 aged 76.

His notes will be sold on November 30 and is could sell for up to €60,000.

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