Eli Lilly says it will begin moving jobs out of Hoosier state over draconian new abortion ban 

Eli Lilly – one of Indiana’s largest employers – says it will begin moving jobs out of the Hoosier state over draconian new abortion ban

  • Indiana-based pharma giant Eli Lilly employs more than 10,000 people and is known for producing drugs such as Prozac
  • On Saturday, the company said in a statement that they will ‘be force to plan for more employment growth’ outside of the Hoosier state
  • The press release came in response to Gov. Eric Holcomb signing a near-total ban on abortion in the state into law on Friday
  • In July, the company did not comment on the impending abortion ban on the state and was not one of the signatories to an ACLU letter to the state legislature
  • Eli Lilly has said that they will honor their current commitments in Indiana including a $2.1 billion investment in a manufacturing plant that will employ 500 

Eli Lilly and Company, which employs more than 10,000 people in the Hoosier state, says that they will ‘be forced to plan for more employment growth outside of our home state.’ 

The Indiana-based pharmaceutical giant made the revelation in a statement on Saturday following the passing of a near-total ban on abortion in the state. Eli Lilly is the manufacturer of drugs such as Prozac and Cymbalta.

On Friday, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb signed Senate Bill 1 into law making his state the first to institute an abortion ban since the Supreme Court‘s decision to overturn Roe v Wade. 

The ban, which comes into effect on September 15, does allow for abortions in the case of rape, incest, if the mother’s life is in danger or if ‘the fetus is diagnosed with a lethal fetal anomaly.’ 

Eli Lilly’s headquarters are located in Indianapolis. The press release said: ‘Lilly recognizes that abortion is a divisive and deeply personal issue with no clear consensus among the citizens of Indiana.’

‘Despite this lack of agreement, Indiana has opted to quickly adopt one of the most restrictive anti-abortion laws in the United States.’ 

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb said after signing the abortion ban: 'I am personally most proud of each Hoosier who came forward to courageously share their views in a debate that is unlikely to cease any time soon'

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb said after signing the abortion ban: ‘I am personally most proud of each Hoosier who came forward to courageously share their views in a debate that is unlikely to cease any time soon’

There are more than 37,00 Eli Lilly employees worldwide. In the second quarter, the company recorded revenues of $6.5 billion

There are more than 37,00 Eli Lilly employees worldwide. In the second quarter, the company recorded revenues of $6.5 billion

 In their press release, the company argued that the new ban will hinder their attempts to bring in ‘diverse scientific, engineering and business talent from around the world.’ 

The statement went on: ‘While we have expanded our employee health plan coverage to include travel for reproductive services unavailable locally, that may not be enough for some current and potential employees.’

‘As a global company headquartered in Indianapolis for more than 145 years, we work hard to retain and attract thousands of people who are important drivers of our state’s economy. 

‘Given this new law, we will be forced to plan for more employment growth outside our home state.’

There are more than 37,00 Eli Lilly employees worldwide. In the second quarter, the company recorded revenues of $6.5 billion. Eli Lilly has a market capitalization of $292 billion.

Following Saturday’s statement, Politico’s Adam Wren tweeted: ‘Lilly consistently declined to comment on the legislation until the bill was signed.’ 

In July, WTHR reported that Eli Lilly refused to comment publicly on the possibility of an abortion ban being passed in the state. The specific question was regarding whether or not the ban would impact their ability to attract new staff. 

Also in July, the ACLU released a letter opposing the potential ban that was signed by more than 200 Indiana businesses. Notable by their absence as a signatory was Eli Lilly, reported the Indianapolis Star. 

Another major employer in Indiana that didn’t sign the letter, engine manufacturer Cummins, released a statement in Saturday that read: ‘The right to make decisions regarding reproductive health ensures that women have the same opportunity as others to participate fully in our workforce and that our workforce is diverse.’

The bill has also been opposed by Indiana’s Chamber of Commerce. 

In May, Eli Lilly announced that the company would invest more than $2 billion in two new factories in Indiana. The new plans would employ create 500 new jobs at the company and 1,500 construction jobs. 

Eli Lilly CEO David Ricks, pictured here, said in an April speech: 'Health, life and inclusion, overall, I think, conditions rank poorly nationally in our state'

Eli Lilly CEO David Ricks, pictured here, said in an April speech: ‘Health, life and inclusion, overall, I think, conditions rank poorly nationally in our state’

Ricks has not personally commented on the abortion ban following his company's statement on Saturday

Ricks has not personally commented on the abortion ban following his company’s statement on Saturday

However in April, Eli Lilly’s CEO David Ricks, alluded to the state’s political climate in a speech at the The Economic Club of Indiana: ‘Our education attainment in the state is not good. The ability to reskill the workforce, I think, could improve. Health, life and inclusion, overall, I think, conditions rank poorly nationally in our state.’ 

He concluded: ‘And also workforce preparedness, also related to reskilling, is a liability for us,’ reports WISH-TV.

The company told the Financial Times that despite Saturday’s press release, they would honor their ‘current commitments’ to Indiana. 

White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said of Indiana's new law: 'It¿s another radical step by Republican legislators to take away women¿s reproductive rights and freedom'

White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said of Indiana’s new law: ‘It’s another radical step by Republican legislators to take away women’s reproductive rights and freedom’

David Hoppe, the president of Gen Con, one of the largest gaming conventions in the US said in a press conference on Wednesday that the possible abortion ban would effect the convention committing to staying in Indiana. 

The convention is taking place in Indianapolis this weekend. 

While the Indiana Hospital Association said that Indiana Republicans were ‘creating an atmosphere that will be perceived as antagonistic to physicians.’ 

Across the country, various businesses have threatened retaliation if state’s pass abortion bans. In Pennsylvania, Duolingo, the  education technology company, said they would move their headquarters from Pittsburgh if an abortion ban was passed in Pennsylvania. 

Companies such as Apple, Kroger, Amazon, Bumble Inc., Citigroup Inc., and Levi’s have announced that they will offer employees resources for reproductive care such as paying for travel costs. 

On Tuesday, voters in Kansas rejected a ballot that would have given state lawmakers the power to enforce a total ban on abortion in the state. 

White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre said of Indiana’s new law: ‘It’s another radical step by Republican legislators to take away women’s reproductive rights and freedom, and put personal health-care decisions in the hands of politicians rather than women and their doctors.’ 

Governor Holcomb said of the bill: ‘I am personally most proud of each Hoosier who came forward to courageously share their views in a debate that is unlikely to cease any time soon.’

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