Enormous huntsman spider lurking above a door frame captures a gecko and eats it Western Australia

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Terrifying footage has emerged of an enormous spider sitting above a doorway and eating a gecko whole.

The TikTok video shows the giant huntsman casually chomping on the reptile on the wall of a house in Western Australia.

A man can be seen in a reflection watching and filming the bizarre sight in disbelief as the lizard disappears into the spider’s mouth with only its tail sticking out.

The shocking discovery, uploaded onto TikTok earlier this month, shows the spider chomping on a gecko at what looks to be the back veranda of a Western Australian house (pictured)

The shocking discovery, uploaded onto TikTok earlier this month, shows the spider chomping on a gecko at what looks to be the back veranda of a Western Australian house (pictured)

TikTok users commented on the spider’s size and confidence, and told the man filming to ‘burn the house down’.

‘Coulda gone my entire life without seeing this,’ one commented. 

‘I saw a spider eat a bird when I lived on the Gold Coast,’ another wrote.

Others said large, hairy spiders were the reason why they ‘would never visit Australia.’ 

‘This is how the fires started in Australia,’ one said. 

‘It’s time to move,’ another commented. 

‘Where in Australia is this? Just so I know not to move there.’

Spider expert Dr Lizzie Lowe, from Macquarie University’s Department of Biological Sciences, told Daily Mail Australia the spider in the video was a grey huntsman.

She said the sight was not unusual but a surprise as lizards were harder for arachnids to digest.

Spider expert Dr Lizzie Lowe (pictured), from Macquarie University's Department of Biological Sciences, believed the spider in the video was a Grey Huntsman, Isopeda vasta

Spider expert Dr Lizzie Lowe (pictured), from Macquarie University’s Department of Biological Sciences, believed the spider in the video was a Grey Huntsman, Isopeda vasta

‘They usually love eating cockroaches because when you think of it cockroaches are mush inside and they’re easy for them to digest, whereas lizards are more complex with bones and harder to get,’ Dr Lowe said. 

She added the spider probably caught the lizard due to its poor eye sight.

‘A fun fact about huntsmans is they have terrible vision and can only see light, dark and movement,’ Dr Lowe said.

‘That’s why it probably caught the lizard. It would’ve caught it without realising.

‘They don’t have a web to catch prey on – they see movement and run at it, do a quick little bite and inject venom.

‘The prey then slows down and it sits there and digests it.’

She said the sight was not unusual but a surprise as lizards were harder for a 'helping house guest' to digest. Pictured: The huntsman spider eating a lizard at a Western Australia home

She said the sight was not unusual but a surprise as lizards were harder for a ‘helping house guest’ to digest. Pictured: The huntsman spider eating a lizard at a Western Australia home 

Dr Lowe added huntsman spiders did not bite and liked to live alone.

‘Huntsman do not represent a threat to humans. It would only bite if you grabbed one and squeezed – but I mean, who wouldn’t,’ she said.

‘If you cannot deal with having one in your house and want to get rid of it, do not use pesticide because then you’re introducing all sorts of chemicals into your home.

‘Chase it with a broom or use an ice cream container to trap it.

‘I usually suggest the cup over and paper under approach, but huntsman spiders are quite big and very, very fast.’

The long-legged spiders can get up to 15cm in size and only reside in households ‘because its dry, safe and there’s cockroaches to eat.’

Dr Lowe added there was only one type of huntsman which lives in groups – but only in the wilderness.

‘There are ones that are quite social and live in big family groups,’ she said.

‘They’re all female and the daughters help the mother to raise the babies – but they’re not harmful and do not live in households.’ 

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