Father of Highland Park shooter says he is ‘not worried’ about culpability


Father of Highland Park shooter says he is ‘not worried’ after cops open probe after he signed off on son’s assault rifle used to kill seven: Picture of second assault rifle he planned to commit second massacre with emerges

  • Robert Crimo Jr. told ABC 7 Chicago that all he did was fill out a basic consent form to let his son go through Illinois State Police process of receiving a firearm
  • Crimo’s attorney, Steve Greenberg, told Fox 32 that the process was ‘no different than signing up your kid for driver’s ed’
  • Robert Crimo III, 21, was able to purchase the rifle he used in the shooting despite being branded as a ‘clear and present danger’ in a 2019 police report

The father of the Highland Park shooter said he is ‘not worried’ about being investigated for culpability after it was revealed he helped his son buy the rifle used in the massacre.

Robert Crimo Jr. told ABC 7 Chicago that all he did was fill out a basic consent form allowing his son, Robert Crimo III, 21, to go through the Illinois State Police process of receiving a firearm owner identification card (FOID) required for ownership.

‘They do background checks. Whatever that entrails, I’m not exactly sure,’ Crimo, a former Highland Park mayoral candidate, said, ‘And either you’re approved or denied, and he was approved.’

Crimo’s attorney, Steve Greenberg, told Fox 32 that the process was ‘no different than signing up your kid for driver’s ed.’

The comments came as a photo of the second gun Crimo carried on the day of the shooting was revealed. He allegedly considered using it in a second attack on another parade but changed his mind at the last minute.

The photo of the Kel Tec SUB2000 - a compact foldable assault rifle - laying across the passenger seat of the car Crimo was driving after the massacre. Crimo considered carrying out a second massacre in Madison, Wisconsin, on the same day with this rifle

The photo of the Kel Tec SUB2000 – a compact foldable assault rifle – laying across the passenger seat of the car Crimo was driving after the massacre. Crimo considered carrying out a second massacre in Madison, Wisconsin, on the same day with this rifle

Robert Crimo Jr. said he was 'not worried' about being found culpable for the massacre

Robert Crimo III killed seven people with an assault rifle his father helped him purchase

Robert Crimo Jr. (left) told ABC 7 Chicago that all he did was fill out a basic consent form allowing his son, Robert Crimo III, 21, (right) to go through the Illinois State Police process of receiving a firearm owner identification card (FOID) required for ownership.

The photo shows a Kel Tec SUB2000 – a compact foldable assault rifle – laying across the passenger seat of the car Crimo was driving after the massacre. 

He had borrowed his mother’s car after murdering seven people in Highland Park and driven to Madison, Wisconsin, where he came across another parade.

‘He seriously contemplated using the firearm in his vehicle to commit another shooting in Madison,’ said Lake County Major Crime Task Force spokesman Christopher Covelli in a news conference.

Crimo also had about 60 rounds of ammunition on him, according to police. 

‘[But] there are indications he didn’t put enough planning forward to commit another attack,’ said Covelli.

The Kel Tec website describes the gun as ‘Light/Compact/Effective,’ and says ‘It tucks away nicely in situations where space is limited, but it’s quick to deploy in situations where time is of the essence.’

‘At the end of the day, the SUB2000 is simply fun to shoot.’

A Remington 700 rifle similar to one owned by Crimo

A Glock 43 pistol similar to one owned by Crimo

Photos of same types of weapons Crimo owned. He used a Smith & Wesson M&P similar to the top photo in the shooting. He also owned a Remington 700 rifle (bottom left) and a Glock 43 pistol (bottom right)

The rifle is one of at least five guns Crimo owns, including the Smith & Wesson M&P 15 he used in the Highland Park shooting, a shotgun, a Remington 700 rifle, and a Glock 43 pistol.

 Crimo was able to purchase the rifle he used in the shooting despite being branded as a ‘clear and present danger’ in a 2019 Highland Park Police report.

Police had confiscated a large collection of knives from the then-19-year-old after he threatened to ‘kill everyone’ in his family. He also threatened to commit suicide. 

Crimo was never charged in that incident, and his parents filed no red flags over mental health concerns.

Despite the threats of violence, Crimo’s father signed the forms allowing his son to apply for the FOID card mere weeks later. 

He was dressed in all-black, wore his long dark hair draped over one eye and shifted on his feet as he appeared via Zoom from a room in the Lake County Jail.

He was dressed in all-black, wore his long dark hair draped over one eye and shifted on his feet as he appeared via Zoom from a room in the Lake County Jail.

He was dressed in all-black, wore his long dark hair draped over one eye and shifted on his feet as he appeared via Zoom from a room in the Lake County Jail.

Speaking to The New York Post, Robert Crimo Jr. (above) shouldered no blame for his son's shooting and said he had 'zero' responsibility

Speaking to The New York Post, Robert Crimo Jr. (above) shouldered no blame for his son’s shooting and said he had ‘zero’ responsibility

Even though Illinois uses a red-flag system to prevent potentially violent individuals from buying guns, Crimo passed four police background checks and was given the green light to purchase the weapon he would use to murder seven people with.

Speaking to The New York Post, Crimo’s father shouldered no blame for the shooting and said he had ‘zero’ responsibility.

‘He bought everything on his own, and they’re registered to him,’ he said, ‘You know, he drove there, he ordered them, he picked them up, they did his background check on each one.’

Death toll in Highland Park July Fourth shooting rises to seven

The number of people who have died in the Highland Park Fourth of July massacre has risen to seven, as of Wednesday. 

The victims include Stephen Straus, 88; Katherine Goldstein, 64; Jacki Sundheim, 63; Nicholas Toledo Zaragoza, 78; Eduardo Uvaldo, 69, and husband and wife, Irina and Kevin McCarthy, 35 and 37. 

On Wednesday, the Cook County Medical Examiner’s office revealed that the seventh victim, Uvaldo, died at Evanston Hospital around 8 a.m. The number of injured victims now stands at 46, ranging in age from 8 to 85 years old.

Robert Crimo, 21, appeared in Lake County court on Wednesday, after being charged with seven counts of first-degree murder. He is expected to face a slew of other charges and is being held without bail.

Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart told the court that Crimo carried out a ‘calculated and premeditated attack’. He said Crimo confessed to standing on a roof above the parade route and took aim at people standing across the street, reloading his Smith & Wesson AR-15 rifle three times. 

Police recovered 83 spent casings from the roof. 

Irina and Kevin McCarthy, 35 and 37, were both killed in the massacre. Their two-year-old son, Aiden, was pulled from underneath his father's body

Irina and Kevin McCarthy, 35 and 37, were both killed in the massacre. Their two-year-old son, Aiden, was pulled from underneath his father’s body

Nicolas Toledo, 76, hadn't wanted to attend the July 4 parade in Highland Park, Ill., on Monday, his granddaughter told the New York Times. But because of his disabilities that restricted him to a wheelchair, and his family's insistence of going, he obliged

Jacki Sundheim, a longtime staffer at North Shore Congregation Israel, was shot and killed when a gunman opened fire at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Ill., on Monday

Nicolas Toledo, 76, had not wanted to attend the July 4 parade in Highland Park, Ill., on Monday, his granddaughter because he was in a wheelchair

Irina and Kevin McCarthy, 35 and 37, were the parents of a two-year-old boy, Aiden, who is now orphaned. He was pulled from underneath his father’s body and taken care of by paradegoers. 

Nicolas Toledo, 76 was the first victim to be identified. He was a grandfather visiting his family from Mexico. His family said he was shot in the head as he sat in his wheelchair, his blood splattering on them. 

Toledo had not wanted to attend the parade, his granddaughter told the New York Times. But because of his disabilities that restricted him to a wheelchair, and his family’s insistence of going, he obliged. 

Another victim, Jacki Sundheim was a longtime teacher at the North Shore Congregation Israel synagogue. She is survived by her husband Bruce and daughter Leah, the Times of Israel reported. 

‘There are no words sufficient to express the depth of our grief for Jacki’s death,’ the synagogue said in a statement.

Eduardo Uvaldo, 69, who was in hospital with a gunshot wound to the arm and back of the head, died on Wednesday. His wife, Maria, was hit in the head by fragments, and his grandson received a gunshot wound to the arm but is stable.

On Wednesday, Katherine Goldstein’s daughter, Cassie, described how her mother was shot in the chest and fell down dead in front of her. 

‘He shot her in the chest, and she fell down. And I knew she was dead,’ Cassie told ‘NBC Nightly News.’ ‘So I just told her that I loved her, but I couldn’t stop because he was still shooting everyone next to me.’ 

Katherine Goldstein, pictured left, was among the people killed in the Highland Park parade mass shooting on July 4

Katherine Goldstein, pictured left, was among the people killed in the Highland Park parade mass shooting on July 4

Steve Straus, 88, was among the seven people who were killed during the Highland Park Fourth of July parade massacre

Eduardo Uvaldo died on Wednesday. Family said he had been shot in the arm and back of the head

Steve Straus, 88, (left) was among the seven people who were killed during the Highland Park Fourth of July parade massacre. Eduardo Uvaldo, 65, (right) died on Wednesday. Family said he had been shot in the arm and back of the head

A local doctor who rushed into the carnage described the shooting victims as being ‘blown up’ by the attacker’s high-powered weapon.

Dr. David Baum, a long-time obstetrician in Highland Park, was attending the parade with his wife and children to watch his two-year-old grandson participate. When the shots rang out and others fled, he ran into the fray to try to help the victims.

In an interview with CNN, Baum described seeing victims with ‘wartime’ and ‘unspeakable’ injuries.

‘The people who were gone were blown up by that gunfire,’ Baum said. ‘The horrific scene of some of those bodies is unspeakable for the average person.’

‘Having been a physician, I’ve seen things in ERs, you know, you do see lots of blood. But the bodies were literally — some of the bodies — there was an evisceration injury from the power of this gun and the bullets.’

‘There was another person who had an unspeakable head injury. Unspeakable,’ he told CNN. 

‘And the injuries  that I saw — I never served — but those are wartime injuries. Those are what are seen in victims of war, not victims at a parade,’ Baum said. 

Baum said there were at least three doctors, a nurse and a nurse practitioner, who joined him in treating victims. He recalled paramedics covering up victims who they knew were dead at the scene.  

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