Fitbit’s latest smartwatch can sense when you’re stressed and tracks your heart rate 24/7

Sponsored Video
Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  

The new Fitbit Sense offers the world’s first electrodermal activity (EDA) sensor on a smartwatch, so it can immediately detect if you’re stressed and offer you a range of treatments – imperative in the midst of a pandemic.

With an advanced heart rate tracking monitor and an on-wrist temperature checker to detect early signs of illness it’s state-of-the-art health advice at your fingertips.

It works collaboratively with your phone to play music and podcasts as you exercise, registers your steps and can make calls on the go.

For those who don’t want to remove it while swimming or in the shower – you don’t have to. The watch is waterproof up to a depth of 50 metres.

The new Fitbit Sense offers the world's first electrodermal activity (EDA) sensor on a smartwatch (pictured)

The new Fitbit Sense offers the world’s first electrodermal activity (EDA) sensor on a smartwatch (pictured)

If that wasn’t impressive enough the $499.95 device comes with a free six-month trial of Fitbit Premium, which provides a greater insight into your sleeping habits and workout ideas.

During the coronavirus pandemic more Australians than ever before have been turning towards exercise as a means of coping with the health crisis at hand. 

In analysing the data of its active users in Australia from March 1 to August 31, 2020, as compared to the same time period in 2019, Fitbit has seen a monumental increase in the uptake of mindfulness activities such as yoga, meditation and Pilates.

There has been a 3,508 per cent increase in meditation, 187 per cent increase in yoga and 52 per cent increase in Pilates.  

If that wasn't impressive enough the $499.95 device comes with a free six-month trial of Fitbit Premium, which provides a greater insight into your sleeping habits and workout ideas

If that wasn’t impressive enough the $499.95 device comes with a free six-month trial of Fitbit Premium, which provides a greater insight into your sleeping habits and workout ideas

Psychologist and Therapist, Leanne Hall, said COVID-19 has forced the nation to slow down and reflect. 

‘For many, this has led to an increased self-awareness that we are all too busy (and over-scheduled). As such, many people have taken up mediation to learn how to slow down internally,’ she told FEMAIL.

This increasing awareness for many has led to an acute sensitivity to stress and anxiety. 

We are more ‘tuned in’ to our responses and because of this many have chosen to mediate more as a way of managing stress and anxiety.

This increasing awareness for many has led to an acute sensitivity to stress and anxiety

This increasing awareness for many has led to an acute sensitivity to stress and anxiety

‘Our collective delusion of “control” has been smashed by COVID. Until recently, we have all been living in a bubble which tells us we know what lies ahead. We live by our diaries – planning for a future which we used to take for granted,’ Leanne said.

‘We now realise that we don’t have that control. We can no longer make plans with any confidence, so we feel a little out of control.

‘I think many people have chosen to manage this uncertainty (and associated anxiety) by learning to be more in the moment and mindful.’ 

Source


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  

Related posts