Five soldiers confirmed dead after MV-22B Osprey belonging to 3rd Marine Air Wing crashed in CA


Five soldiers are confirmed dead after MV-22B Osprey belonging to 3rd Marine Air Wing crashed in the Californian desert

  • The five marines in the MV-22B Osprey crash in California have been confirmed dead by the 3rd Marine Air Wing on Thursday
  • ‘We mourn the loss of our Marines in this tragic mishap. Our hearts go out to their families and friends as they cope with this tragedy,’ the statement read
  • The military has not released the soldiers name as family notification is pending 
  • The crash happened near Glamis, 30 miles north of the Mexican border and 150 miles east of San Diego
  • Initial reports said there was nuclear material on board the aircraft, but that has since been debunked 
  • A total of 46 people have been killed in the last 30 years from Osprey accidents 

Five U.S. Marines have been confirmed dead after an MV-22B Osprey belonging to the 3rd Marine Air Wing crashed in the California desert. 

The MV-22B Osprey crashed in Imperial County near Highway 78 and the town of Glamis, which is 30 miles north of the Mexican border, and 150 miles east of San Diego.

On Thursday, the 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing confirmed the deaths in a statement, writing: ‘We mourn the loss of our Marines in this tragic mishap. Our hearts go out to their families and friends as they cope with this tragedy.’ 

The military has not released the names of the soldier, pending family notification. 

Equipment recovery has begun at the site and the investigation is ongoing. 

 

The five marines who were involved the MV-22B Osprey crash on Wednesday were confirmed dead

The five marines who were involved the MV-22B Osprey crash on Wednesday were confirmed dead 

The 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing confirmed the dead, writing: 'We mourn the loss of our Marines in this tragic mishap. Our hearts go out to their families and friends as they cope with this tragedy.' The military has not released the names of the soldier, pending family notification

The 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing confirmed the dead, writing: ‘We mourn the loss of our Marines in this tragic mishap. Our hearts go out to their families and friends as they cope with this tragedy.’ The military has not released the names of the soldier, pending family notification

The crash was confirmed by Naval Air Facility in El Centro on Wednesday, who investigated the crash. 

The crash happened about 12.25pm local time, said 1st Lt. Duane Kampa, a 3rd MAW spokesman. 

Footage from News 11 Yuma showed military personnel and first responders gathering in the desert, with a helicopter flying off to the crash site. Smoke could be faintly seen on the horizon. 

There were rumors the plane had been carrying nuclear material when it crashed, but that has since been debunked. 

‘Contrary to initial reports, there was no nuclear material on board the aircraft.’ 

First responders and military personnel are seen arriving at the site of Wednesday's crash

First responders and military personnel are seen arriving at the site of Wednesday’s crash

A Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey is pictured in 2012. An aircraft like this crashed on Wednesday

A Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey is pictured in 2012. An aircraft like this crashed on Wednesday

A helicopter is seen on Wednesday taking off near Glamis, to aid the rescue effort

A helicopter is seen on Wednesday taking off near Glamis, to aid the rescue effort

The aircraft crashed on military land in a desert area 30 miles from the border with Mexico

The aircraft crashed on military land in a desert area 30 miles from the border with Mexico

The MV-22B Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft, built by Boeing, which can carry 24 Marine combat troops, according to Military.com.

Boeing says it is ‘a joint service multirole combat aircraft’ which has both the vertical performance of a helicopter and the speed and range of a fixed-wing aircraft. 

‘With its rotors in vertical position, it can take off, land and hover like a helicopter,’ Boeing explain. 

‘Once airborne, it can convert to a turboprop airplane capable of high-speed, high-altitude flight. 

‘This combination results in global reach capabilities that allow the V-22 to fill an operational niche unlike any other aircraft.’

It have been in use since 2007. 

The aircraft were first tested in 1989, but the program initially struggled, and there were several crashes during testing that resulted in 30 deaths. 

Adjustments were made by the Navy and Marine Corps, and it was first deployed in Iraq.

Glamis is famed for the Algodones Dunes, 30 miles north of the US-Mexico border. This is where the crash occurred

Glamis is famed for the Algodones Dunes, 30 miles north of the US-Mexico border. This is where the crash occurred 

Naval Air Facility El Centro confirmed the crash. The facility is around 30 miles from the crash site

Naval Air Facility El Centro confirmed the crash. The facility is around 30 miles from the crash site

Osprey accidents: 46 people killed in 30 years

1989 – The first prototypes flew in March, and the second in September.

1991-2 – The fourth and fifth prototypes crashed, with five dying in the Potomac River when the fifth crashed in July 1992, and the aircraft was modified as a result.

Apr 2000 – An Osprey crashed during a night training exercise at Marana Regional Airport near Tucson, Arizona, killing all 19 Marines on board. The fleet was grounded.

Dec 2000 – Another Osprey crashed during training near Jacksonville, North Carolina, killing four Marines.

Dec 2005 – The Marine Corps received its first batch of combat-ready Ospreys.

Apr 2010 – Four people are killed when an Osprey crashes in Zabul province in southern Afghanistan.

Apr 2012 – Two Marines die when an Osprey crashes in the Draa River in Morocco.

Oct 2014 – One killed in a crash in the Arabian Gulf.

May 2015 – Two killed in an Osprey accident in Hawaii.

Aug 2017 – Three Marines killed off the coast of Queensland, Australia.

Mar 2022 – An MV-22B crashed in Norway during a training exercise, killing four.

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