Flags return to full-mast in Britain and across world after ten days of mourning for the Queen ends

Flags return to full-mast on buildings in Britain and across world after ten days of mourning for the Queen ends

Flags have been returned to full-mast on buildings in Britain and across the world after the 10 day mourning period for the Queen came to an end. 

After the death of Queen Elizabeth II on September 8, flags on government buildings and at landmark locations were lowered to half mast in her honour. 

But as Her Majesty’s funeral yesterday marked the end of a solemn period of mourning, flags have poignantly started to be returned to full-mast around the world as public life resumes. 

Flags will remain at half-mast on royal buildings until 8am on September 27, after the final day of royal mourning ends, as the royal family observe an additional week of mourning with no official engagements taking place. 

Union flags are traditionally lowered to half-mast following a royal death as a symbol of respect and mourning. 

A flag fluttering at full-mast over Westminster Abbey the day after the Queen's state funeral

A flag fluttering at full-mast over Westminster Abbey the day after the Queen’s state funeral

A Union Jack flag back at full-mast in London, where thousands have been commemorating the death of the Queen for the last 10 days

A Union Jack flag back at full-mast in London, where thousands have been commemorating the death of the Queen for the last 10 days

Flags are seen back at full-mast at the famous Sydney Harbour Bridge in Australia

Flags are seen back at full-mast at the famous Sydney Harbour Bridge in Australia 

'As the National Mourning period has come to an end, we now fly our flag at full mast, in honour of our King,' the UK embassy in Berne, Switzerland, tweeted

The High Commissioner to the Bahamas said they have returned flags to full-mast as mourning comes to an end

The UK embassy in Bern, Switzerland, confirmed they will now fly their flag at full-mast (left) while The High Commissioner to the Bahamas said they have also returned flags to full-mast

The moment the flag was returned to full mast at the royal palace in Oslo, Norway

The moment the flag was returned to full mast at the royal palace in Oslo, Norway

Photos poignantly showed a flag fluttering at full-mast over Westminster Abbey on Tuesday, after 2000 gathered at the church yesterday for the Queen’s funeral. 

Another photo showed the Union Jack flag flying at full-mast against the backdrop of the London eye, an iconic landmark in a city which has seen thousands of people lining the streets over the last 10 days to commemorate the life of Queen Elizabeth II. 

Flags were also back at full-mast around the world – including at Sydney Harbour bridge, Australia and at the royal palace in Oslo, Norway. 

The UK embassy in Berne tweeted: ‘As the National Mourning period has come to an end, we now fly our flag at full mast, in honour of our King.’

Meanwhile, the British Embassy in the Netherlands confirmed: ‘This morning at 9am, our flags were raised to full mast at the British Embassy in the Hague by British Defence Attaché @PiersStrudwick and at the Ambassador’s Residence by Flying Officer, Brad Duesbury.’

The High Commissioner to the Bahamas tweeted: ‘As the period of mourning ends, our flag returns to full mast.’

Buildings all over the UK returned flags to full-mast including at Lincolnshire County Council, Sandwell Council in Oldbury, Canterbury Council, Tormead independent school in Surrey, St George’s Church in Altrincham, Greater Manchester and across community fire stations at Tyne and Wear. 

Flags were raised to full-mast in the Netherlands

A flag poignantly flies at full-mast in the Netherlands

The British Embassy in the Netherlands said flags were raised to full-mast at the British Embassy in the Hague and at the Ambassador’s Residence

Lincolnshire County Council is one of the many council buildings around the UK to raise their flag again

Lincolnshire County Council is one of the many council buildings around the UK to raise their flag again

St George's Church in Altrincham, Manchester, said the flag is back at full-mast and the condolence book safely stored away

St George’s Church in Altrincham, Manchester, said the flag is back at full-mast and the condolence book safely stored away

'The Union Flags, which have been flying at half mast around Sandwell as a mark of respect, have returned to full mast today to mark the end of the period of national mourning for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II,' Sandwell Council said

‘The Union Flags, which have been flying at half mast around Sandwell as a mark of respect, have returned to full mast today to mark the end of the period of national mourning for Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II,’ Sandwell Council said

At 8am this morning, flags across community fire stations in Tyne and Wear returned to full mast

At 8am this morning, flags across community fire stations in Tyne and Wear returned to full mast

Tormead independent school in Surrey said: 'The death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has been an incredibly significant and poignant event in our history'

Tormead independent school in Surrey said: ‘The death of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has been an incredibly significant and poignant event in our history’

The flag remains at half-mast at Buckingham Palace and at royal residences as the royals observe another week of mourning

The flag remains at half-mast at Buckingham Palace and at royal residences as the royals observe another week of mourning

Official government guidance following the Queen’s death on September 8 said: ‘Following the death of Her Majesty The Queen, all official flags, including the Union Flag, should be half-masted from as soon as possible today until 08.00 the day following The Queen’s State Funeral. Flags may be flown overnight during this period but should remain at half-mast.

‘Official flags in this instance are defined as national flags of the home nations, Crown Dependencies and Overseas Territories, Ensigns and Ships’ colours.

‘Any non-official flags flying or due to be flown, such as the Rainbow Flag or the Armed Forces Day Flag, should be taken down and replaced with a Union Flag at half-mast. Other official flags scheduled to be flown can be flown as normal, but at half-mast.

‘Half-mast means the flag is flown a third of the way down the flagpole from the top, with at least the height of the flag between the top of the flag and the top of the flagpole.

‘On poles that are more than 45° from the vertical, flags cannot be flown at half-mast and should not be flown at all.

‘The Union Flag must be flown the correct way up – in the half of the flag nearest the flagpole, the wider diagonal white stripe must be above the red diagonal stripe.’

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