Former Prime Minister Julia Gillard reveals whether she thinks the Queen was a FEMINIST

Former Prime Minister Julia Gillard reveals whether she thinks the Queen was a FEMINIST: ‘She helped normalise a version of female leadership’

Julia Gillard has praised Queen Elizabeth II for inspiring women to aspire to positions of power during her lifetime of leadership. 

The former Prime Minister of Australia appeared on Monday’s episode of The Project on the day of the Queen’s funeral, and explained that while she feels the late Royal would not have used the word ‘feminist’ to describe herself, Her Majesty’s contribution to the cause was nonetheless felt around the world. 

‘I have severe doubts she would have used that word about herself,’ Gillard, 60, told the program’s hosts. 

Julia Gillard (pictured) has praised Queen Elizabeth II for inspiring women to aspire to positions of power during her lifetime of leadership

Julia Gillard (pictured) has praised Queen Elizabeth II for inspiring women to aspire to positions of power during her lifetime of leadership

‘But I do think she’s made a feminist contribution, in the sense that we know that role modelling of women’s leadership, role modelling of women on the public stage, does make a difference to the aspirations of girls and young women.’

She continued:  ‘If they can see someone else doing it, being in those rarefied halls and environments, they can imagine themselves being there. And I think over many decades she did have that kind of image.’

Gillard added that during a conversation with Theresa May, the former UK Prime Minister said that, ‘she thought the many decades of the Queen’s service helped normalise a version of female leadership for the UK’. 

'I have severe doubts she would have used that word about herself,' Gillard said. 'But I do think she's made a feminist contribution, in the sense that we know that role modelling of women's leadership, role modelling of women on the public stage, does make a difference to the aspirations of girls and young women'. The Queen is pictured in 2018

‘I have severe doubts she would have used that word about herself,’ Gillard said. ‘But I do think she’s made a feminist contribution, in the sense that we know that role modelling of women’s leadership, role modelling of women on the public stage, does make a difference to the aspirations of girls and young women’. The Queen is pictured in 2018

‘And of course the UK has now just joined a very elite club of nations with three female leaders. So it’s only New Zealand, Finland and the UK that have had three female Prime Ministers,’ Gillard concluded. 

On Monday, the Queen passed Buckingham Palace for the final time followed by her mourning family as her coffin was carried from Westminster Abbey and through London after her state funeral. 

Her Majesty will be laid to rest in Windsor next to her beloved husband Prince Philip and her parents. 

She continued: 'If they can see someone else doing it, being in those rarefied halls and environments, they can imagine themselves being there. And I think over many decades she did have that kind of image.' The Queen is pictured in 2005

She continued: ‘If they can see someone else doing it, being in those rarefied halls and environments, they can imagine themselves being there. And I think over many decades she did have that kind of image.’ The Queen is pictured in 2005

Grief was etched on the faces of King Charles, his siblings and children as well as the huge crowds who swamped The Mall, Whitehall and Parliament Square to bade farewell to the beloved monarch.

The crowds would later break into applause and cheers after the Queen’s coffin passed them and also when Her Majesty circled round the Queen Victoria Memorial outside Buckingham Palace as Big Ben chimed 96 times – one for each year of her life – a mile away.

The poignant scenes followed an extraordinary and emotional state funeral attended by 2,000 VIPs, royals, prime ministers and several hundred ordinary Britons chosen by the Queen. Outside on the streets and estimated 2million people were there to mourn her passing 11 days ago.

On Monday, the Queen passed Buckingham Palace for the final time followed by her mourning family as her coffin was carried from Westminster Abbey and through London after her state funeral

On Monday, the Queen passed Buckingham Palace for the final time followed by her mourning family as her coffin was carried from Westminster Abbey and through London after her state funeral

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