HEALTH NOTES: Myopia link to heart attacks and strokes


HEALTH NOTES: Short-sighted young adults are FOUR TIMES more likely to suffer strokes or heart attacks in later life, research shows

Short-sighted young adults may be more at risk of heart attacks and strokes in later life.

Researchers examined the records of more than 90,000 Britons in the UK Biobank – a database of half a million people who have agreed to have their health tracked for life. 

Those who suffered with myopia were four times more likely to have suffered a heart attack or stroke, or to have developed type 2 diabetes. 

Researchers suggested a lack of outdoor physical activity and too much screen time – which is known to increase the risk of myopia in young adults – were to blame.

Those who suffered with myopia were four times more likely to have suffered a heart attack or stroke, or to have developed type 2 diabetes.

Those who suffered with myopia were four times more likely to have suffered a heart attack or stroke, or to have developed type 2 diabetes.

The common bacteria thought to cause stomach ulcers may also protect against painful inflammatory bowel disease, according to new research.

Helicobacter pylori, or H. pylori, exists harmlessly in the digestive tracts of more than half the population. However, in some it can damage the stomach lining and lead to agonising ulcers.

A review of studies looking at the effects of H. pylori found mounting evidence that its presence in the digestive tract increases other beneficial bugs and compounds that prevent this reaction from occurring in the first place.

This might explain why inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn’s and colitis are far less common in Asian countries, where a greater percentage of the population carry H.pylori in their system than in Western countries.

The common bacteria thought to cause stomach ulcers may also protect against painful inflammatory bowel disease, according to new research

The common bacteria thought to cause stomach ulcers may also protect against painful inflammatory bowel disease, according to new research

Millions of arthritis sufferers struggle with intimacy because of their condition, a survey has suggested.

Managing daily pain, lack of mobility, stress and anxiety all take their toll on sex lives, according to the research by the charity Arthritis Action.

More than 20 million people in the UK live with musculoskeletal conditions such as arthritis. Joint and back pain, fatigue and sleep problems are common symptoms.

Arthritis Action advises those having intimacy issues during a flare-up of symptoms to experiment. It says: ‘Think outside of the bed and use chairs for seated positions, or non-weight-bearing positions.’

Synchronised  movements are the key to a successful romance, scientists have concluded.

Researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem found that couples on dates who moved in a similar way, such as smiling, nodding or shifting an arm or a leg, were more likely to click.

They used wrist bands to record electrical signals among 16 pairs on speed dates. Participants then rated their partner’s attractiveness.

Researchers found that successful dates showed synchronised activity within the first two minutes.

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