Scientists develop spray gun to paint bandages onto wounds

Doctors and nurses could soon be able to spray bandages filled with drugs directly onto wounds, new research suggests. Scientists from Montana Technology University, in Butte, say the process – called electrospinning – sprays tiny fibers to cover cuts and scrapes while providing controlled drug release over time. The medicine woven into the fibers would help speed up the healing process and limit the risk of infection without the need to constantly change wound dressings. The team also says the system could help save lives in rural areas where immediate…

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Scientists slam Trump administration’s fetal tissue research ban

A pair of prominent medical researchers have slammed the Trump administration’s ban on the use of controversial fetal tissue in research, calling the move a roadblock to ‘mission to advance medical science,’ in a new editorial.    Research conducted using fetal tissue has led to life-saving developments like the measles vaccine and the progression of HIV into AIDS.   But it’s acquired from recently aborted fetuses, a practice to which some have moral objections.  On July 5, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) severed ties with the University of California,…

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Casey Wilson felt guilty after learning her son’s mood swings were caused by celiac disease 

Actress Casey Wilson is opening up about the shock of learning that her son’s years of mysterious health problems were being caused by celiac disease. In a personal essay for The New York Times, Wilson wrote that she first noticed something was wrong with her now four-year-old, Max, when he was two. He was often lethargic, slept as much as 14 hours a day, would go through seemingly inexplicable mood changes, and had trouble connecting with children in his age range.  Wilson and her husband took their son to multiple doctors…

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Girl, 5, was left unrecognisable after being set on fire by a candle and left in a coma for a month

These are the harrowing images of a five-year-old girl who was set on fire by a candle and left with third degree burns all over her body.  Gianna’s t-shirt was set alight as she played with a scented candle in her grandmother’s house in Algonac, Michigan. Her panicked grandmother scrambled to put the fire out and call an ambulance, which rushed the youngster to a children’s hospital in Detroit. When her mother Rebeka Wrightman, 27, next saw her little girl she was ‘unrecognisable’ and wrapped head-to-toe in bandages. The youngster was kept…

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Eczema-stricken woman makes recovery by ‘ditching steroid creams and showering once a WEEK’

An eczema sufferer whose body was left red raw has made a dramatic recovery by ditching steroid creams and showering just once a week.    Holly Broome, 24, from London, has battled the skin condition ever since she was two weeks old.  The graphic designer went to a GP but in 2017 following a bad flare-up – but claims she was only told it wasn’t ‘that bad’, to moisturise more often and use a stronger topical steroid than she had been her whole life. But her skin seemed to be getting…

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Boy with ‘dementia’ recognises parents again after getting a chip implanted in his head

A five-year-old boy who forgot his parents due to a rare ‘childhood dementia’ has recognised them again after having a chip implanted in his head. Harley Bond, from Sheffield, was diagnosed with Sanfilippo syndrome when he was three and within months it began robbing him of his memory. The genetic disorder is caused by a lack of an enzyme that normally breaks down and recycles a large sugar molecule called heparan sulphate. It affects around one in 70,000 children and kills most sufferers before they become an adult.   Over time,…

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£399 headset claims to treat insomnia by zapping the brain

A headset which zaps the brain to treat insomnia could soon be available to buy and use at home. The device targets neurons in the brain responsible for sleep with with small jolts of electricity. Its maker claim it reduces the time it takes to nod off.  The portable gadget, which will cost £399, improved the sleep of more than 70 per cent of insomniacs, according to data. One third of the population has difficulties sleeping, which means they get less than the eight hours the NHS recommends each night.…

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Controversial CRISPR gene-editing tool could be used to detect viruses

Gene-editing tool CRISPR could be used to spot deadly viruses in under an hour from a single drop of blood, scientists claim. Experts programmed the controversial technology to find human papillomavirus (HPV), known to cause several types of cancer. Laboratory tests of the tool proved it could also spot parvovirus, which can lead to miscarriages in pregnant women. The re-programmed CRISPR technology works by scouring blood for a specific acid carried by the virus it’s trained to look for. If it detects the acid, the tool – famed for its…

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Three-year-old escapes death after knitting needle penetrated her BRAIN

A three-year-old girl has escaped death after a knitting needle pierced through her brain. The youngster had been pretending the giant needle was a wand while playing at her neighbour’s house. She fell off the bed while jumping around, at which point the needle shot through her mouth and penetrated the base of her skull. The girl, from Utah, was rushed to hospital with the needle lodged in her brain. The other end was coming out of her mouth.   Scans showed the needle had reached the centre of her brain,…

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Meditation could make you less error-prone: 20-minutes of the technique ‘boosts brain activity’ 

Just twenty minutes of meditation could help you stop making mistakes, according to a study.  Scientists say the trendy practice, favoured by the likes of Gwyneth Paltrow, makes people more aware of their errors.    Michigan State University experts scanned the brains of participants while they took a computer test. Half had been through one session of meditation. They discovered an increase in brain signals known to be linked to error recognition among the meditation group, suggesting volunteers were quicker to realise they had made a mistake. However, the researchers did…

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