Heartbroken pet owner issues urgent warning after beloved dog Scout died after eating a pufferfish


Heartbroken pet owner issues warning as his beloved dog Scout dies after eating a poisonous pufferfish hidden in seaweed

  • Adelaide pet owner issues urgent warning after death of beloved rescue dog
  • Border collie Scout ingested a poisonous pufferfish during a stroll on the beach
  • She died within an hour of returning home leaving owner Kym Daly devastated
  • Pufferfish contain enough poison to kill 30 humans and are highly toxic to dogs

A devastated pet owner has issued a urgent warning after his beloved rescue dog Scout died after ingesting a pufferfish hidden in seaweed. 

Kym Daly hadn’t realised his border collie had ingested the poisonous fish during one of their daily walks along the shore of Seacliff Beach in Adelaide

It wasn’t until the nine-year-old vomited when they got home that Mr Daly realised that something was wrong, with Scout sadly passing away within the hour. 

‘When we got home she vomited and I really thought that was the end of it,’ the heartbroken owner told 9News

‘I thought she’d vomited up anything nasty she’d eaten. It was so quick, it was hard.’ 

Kym Daly didn't realise his beloved border collie Scout (pictured) had ingested a poisonous pufferfish during their daily walk along the shore of Seacliff Beach in Adelaide

Kym Daly didn’t realise his beloved border collie Scout (pictured) had ingested a poisonous pufferfish during their daily walk along the shore of Seacliff Beach in Adelaide

It wasn't until the nine-year-old dog vomited when they got home that Mr Daly (pictured) realised that something was amiss, with Scout sadly dying within the hour

It wasn’t until the nine-year-old dog vomited when they got home that Mr Daly (pictured) realised that something was amiss, with Scout sadly dying within the hour

Mr Daly hopes his story and Scout’s tragic passing will mean no other dogs or their owners will have to suffer the same grief. 

‘If I can save one or help one other person and their pet, I’d be really grateful for that,’ he said.

Pufferfish dead or alive are highly toxic to dogs and contain enough poison to bring a rapid onset of paralysis and in some cases death. 

Pufferfish contain a toxin called tetrodotoxin, one of the most deadly natural poisons, with one fish containing enough poison to kill 30 humans. 

The toxin is found on the skin and internal organs of the fish meaning dogs can still be poisoned even if they simply lick or chew the fish. 

Early signs and symptoms of poisoning include vomiting, excessive drooling, panting, dullness and lethargy. 

Mr Daly hopes his story and Scout's tragic passing will mean no other dogs or their owners will have to suffer the same grief

Mr Daly hopes his story and Scout’s tragic passing will mean no other dogs or their owners will have to suffer the same grief 

The pair had been on a walk along Seacliff beach in Adelaide when Scout ate the pufferfish

The pair had been on a walk along Seacliff beach in Adelaide when Scout ate the pufferfish

These symptoms can then progress to trembling, wobbly walking patterns, dilated pupils and muscle tremors and seizures. 

The dog can then become unable to breath or blink, entering a coma or suffering the complete paralysis of the body.  

Pet owners who see their dog eat, chew or lick a puffer fish are encouraged to take them to the vet for treatment as soon as possible. 

As there is no antidote for tetrodotoxin poisoning, vets induce vomiting to remove the toxin, use IV fluids, or even life support in more extreme cases.

Australia is home to up to 57 species of pufferfish, 48 of which are found in Queensland.  

Source

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