High-profile privacy advocate Simon Davies jailed abusing boys

Bald paedophile preyed on vulnerable kids by luring them to a children’s homeless refuge in Sydney’s Kings Cross – as he’s sentenced to six years in jail

  • Simon Davies was sentenced to six years behind bars for sex offences in 1980s
  • Privacy expert worked in a refuge for homeless children in Sydney’s Kings Cross
  • Glen Fisher said Davies abused him when he was just a teenager at the refuge
  • He and other victims have spoken out against Davies and some of his colleagues
  • Four men have been thrown behind bars for offences committed at the refuge

The victims of a vile predator who preyed on vulnerable teenagers by luring them to a refuge for homeless children have finally got the justice they deserve after their tormentor was thrown behind bars for his crimes. 

Simon Davies was charged with a string of child sex offences alleged to have been committed at a children’s refuge in Sydney‘s Kings Cross between 1981 and 1987. 

The world expert on internet freedom turned himself in to Dutch police and was extradited from The Netherlands to Australia in April of 2021. 

His arrival prompted mixed emotions for his victims, including Glen Fisher, who has since made it his prerogative to seek convictions for the men who abused him and other boys while they were living at the refuge. 

Mr Fisher’s bravery has seen three men thrown behind bars for their crimes and in 2019 he made sure their ringleader suffered the same fate. 

Davies was sentenced to 10 years in jail, with six years and three months non-parole. 

Glen Fisher was abused at a homeless refuge for children in Sydney's Kings Cross in the 1980s and has since made it his goal to track down and seek convictions for his abusers

Glen Fisher was abused at a homeless refuge for children in Sydney’s Kings Cross in the 1980s and has since made it his goal to track down and seek convictions for his abusers 

Mr Fisher’s friend Sharon Chambers, who also lived at the refuge, described the home in Kings Cross as a ‘house of horrors’ that was ‘full of pedophiles’. 

She knew something was seriously wrong when she heard strange noises coming from her friend’s room and saw other boys running from the home in tears. 

Mr Fisher was just 14-years-old when he first arrived at the refuge and was desperate to be seen and heard by people he could trust. 

He told A Current Affair that Davies had initially made him feel safe and understood, and would encourage him to drink alcohol with other adults. 

The teenager had already been abused before he lived at the refuge and immediately knew something was wrong when Davies started paying him visits. 

When he worked up the courage to confront his abuser, Davies told the teenager that he was was a heroin addict and that no one would believe him. 

Almost forty years later, Mr Fisher has proven him wrong. 

Davies, considered a world expert on internet freedom, turned himself in to Dutch police and was extradited from The Netherlands to Australia in April of 2021

Davies, considered a world expert on internet freedom, turned himself in to Dutch police and was extradited from The Netherlands to Australia in April of 2021

In 1996, the survivor gave a statement to the Wood Royal Commission into police corruption which led to the conviction of two men from the refuge. 

Paul Chetwynd-Jones, a former counsellor, was found guilty of sex crimes and sentenced to just 18 months in jail.

His colleague, Ken Fogorty, pleaded guilty and was also thrown behind bars. 

While these convictions had been significant wins for Mr Fisher and his fellow survivors he knew he needed to go further.

In 2010, he approached police and was able to convince officers there were more abusers going unpunished for their crimes. 

He worked with police to convict another former counsellor, Grantley Leroy Morris, by wearing a wire and ‘bumping into him’ in Parramatta, in Sydney’s west. 

After exchanging details, he received a late-night call from the ex-counsellor. 

Simon Davies was charged with a string of sex offences alleged to have been committed between 1981 and 1987 at a refuge for homeless children in Sydney's Kings Cross

Simon Davies was charged with a string of sex offences alleged to have been committed between 1981 and 1987 at a refuge for homeless children in Sydney’s Kings Cross

‘He rang me at 10 o’clock at night, one night, drunk. He wanted to reminisce. He was quite graphic,’ Mr Fisher said. 

The pair organised to meet up, but this time Mr Fisher was flanked by an undercover cop who posed as another pedophile. 

‘He said to that detective, ‘we target prepubescent children who come from broken homes, who nobody cares about’,’ Mr Fisher said.

Morris was found guilty and was sentenced to two-and-a-half-years behind bars.  

‘There was a lot of harm done in the 70s and 80s to a lot of children, speak up and even if you can’t get justice, speak up anyway,’ Mr Fisher said. 

Davies (pictured) was sentenced to 10 years in jail, with six years and three months non-parole

Davies (pictured) was sentenced to 10 years in jail, with six years and three months non-parole

Davies has been a commentator, adviser and journalist on a range of technology issues over the last 20 years and claimed to have been voted one of the world’s most influential voices on internet freedoms.

He became a high-profile figure in the privacy industry as well as his efforts to overturn Australia’s controversial national ID card proposal in the late 1980s. 

According to Davies’ website, he received numerous awards and relating to internet freedom and claimed to have spoken publicly thousands on privacy and appeared on ‘almost every major current affairs program and newspaper in the world’.

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