Ian Wright ‘set to explore domestic abuse and his troubled childhood in BBC documentary’

Sponsored Video
Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  

Ian Wright is reportedly set to explore domestic abuse and his tough upbringing in a BBC documentary.

According to reports, the former Arsenal ace, 56, who has detailed living with his ‘frightening’ stepfather as a child in the past, will interview both victims and abusers while reflecting on his own experiences.

On the film, which is currently untitled, a source said: ‘It’s to give a voice to victims of abuse and to give them hope. 

Awareness: Ian Wright is reportedly set to explore domestic abuse and his tough upbringing in a BBC documentary

Awareness: Ian Wright is reportedly set to explore domestic abuse and his tough upbringing in a BBC documentary

‘It’s also incredibly rare to see a black man talking about these experiences. He hopes that will remove some of the taboo around topics like abuse. It’s going to be a powerful piece of work.’ 

The insider added to The Sun: ‘Behind the smiles lies an incredibly traumatic child­hood which Ian wants to tell in his own words. He had an abusive stepfather who would cruelly make him face the wall when Match Of The Day was on.’ 

MailOnline has contacted Ian’s representatives and a BBC spokesperson for further comment.

Earlier this year, the football legend tearfully recalled how his brother would cover his ears to mask his mother Nesta’s anguished cries as she was assaulted by his stepfather.

Candid: The ex-Arsenal ace, 56, will interview both victims and abusers while reflecting on his own experiences (pictured in the past)

Candid: The ex-Arsenal ace, 56, will interview both victims and abusers while reflecting on his own experiences (pictured in the past)

Ian Wright as a young boy

‘It wasn’t a loving place to be’: The media personality has detailed living with his ‘frightening’ stepfather as a child in the past (pictured as a baby)

The former England player turned broadcaster spoke out in a highly emotional edition of Desert Island Discs on BBC Radio 4. 

He bravely shared: ‘She was 4ft 11in and he was 6ft 4in, and I would see him lift her and do stuff to her.

‘I remember my brother Maurice, when my stepfather used to be really, really manhandling my mum, my brother used to cover my ears so you couldn’t hear it. When this song comes on, it just takes me back to that place.’ 

The sports star, who was deserted by his real father Herbert at the age of 18 months, revealed he grew up terrified of his stepfather, stating: ‘It wasn’t a loving place to be.

Hard: Earlier this year, the football legend recalled how his brother masked his mother's cries as she was assaulted by his stepfather (pictured with his mum and then-wife Debbie in 2000)

Hard: Earlier this year, the football legend recalled how his brother masked his mother’s cries as she was assaulted by his stepfather (pictured with his mum and then-wife Debbie in 2000)

‘My stepfather was a very big, growly-voiced, gambling, weed-smoking, angry man who frightened me.

‘All I have known from a young age was my stepfather, and I was never, anywhere near, somebody that he liked.’

Ian also claimed the violent atmosphere at home would influence his behaviour on the pitch, admitting: ‘When I played football, as soon as it got to a point where I couldn’t deal with it, I would lash out.

‘The therapy was the best thing that ever happened to me because I realised that a lot of it stemmed from my youth.’ 

Last year, the media personality also touched on the time he broke down in tears when he sat on bench as a child waiting for his biological father to show up.

The I’m A Celebrity 2019 contestant told The Mirror: ‘My estate were all going on holiday to the seaside, but I didn’t have any trousers to wear. I was told my dad, who I hadn’t seen for years, would be there at half nine to give me some money.

‘But it got to five and he still hadn’t arrived. I often still think about that day now….it was the worst time of my life.

‘I can’t remember ever being hugged. I just felt really, really alone. All I thought about was much I hated being in my house, how much I hated my sister and aunt, I hated my step-dad, and how my mum never showed anything.’ 

Victims of domestic abuse can call the National Domestic Abuse Helpline on 0808 2000 247 or visit nationaldahelpline.org.uk at any time.

'I would lash out': Ian also claimed the violent atmosphere at home would influence his behaviour on the pitch (pictured in 1993)

‘I would lash out’: Ian also claimed the violent atmosphere at home would influence his behaviour on the pitch (pictured in 1993)

Source


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •   
  •  
  •  

Related posts