Illegal migrants who are due to be removed to Rwanda will be released on electronic tags this week


Illegal migrants who are due to be removed to Rwanda will be released on electronic tags this week

  • An Albanian man in his 20s who was meant to be sent to Rwanda will be released
  • He will have an electronic ankle bracelet after an immigration court hearing
  • A Home Office trial will see migrants, including many who crossed the Channel in small boats, tagged and released over the next 12 months

Illegal migrants due for removal to Rwanda are to be released on electronic tags this week.

An Albanian man in his 20s is one of several who were scheduled to be flown out of Britain to the East African country earlier this month.

But he is set to be tagged and released within days after providing an immigration court hearing with an address where he will live.

A Home Office trial will see migrants, including many who crossed the Channel in small boats, tagged and released over the next 12 months.

A Home Office trial will see migrants, including many who crossed the Channel in small boats, tagged and released over the next 12 months

A Home Office trial will see migrants, including many who crossed the Channel in small boats, tagged and released over the next 12 months

Officials are continuing to notify migrants who are detained after sailing in flimsy craft from the Continent that they could be removed to Rwanda.

The Government struck a deal with the Rwandan government earlier this year for the African state to accept asylum seekers who travel to Britain illegally. There they can claim asylum and, if successful, begin a new life.

The Ministry of Defence revealed that another 231 migrants crossed the Channel in small boats on Friday, taking last week’s figure to more than 800.

More than 2,500 have crossed this month, raising the total so far this year to over 12,000 – more than double what it was by the end of June last year.

About 8,400 migrants crossed in 2020 and more than 28,000 made the journey in 2021.

In April, the Government announced plans to send some asylum seekers to Rwanda as part of a five-year trial.

The Home Office won a series of court judgments against refugee charities and a union representing Border Force staff in the lead up to the first flight on June 14.

But it was blocked at the last minute after a late intervention by the European Court of Human Rights. A full judicial review of the policy is expected to take place in July.

A Home Office spokesman said: ‘The Government will not be deterred as we plan for the next flight to Rwanda.

‘We will keep as many people in detention as the law allows, but where a court orders that an individual due to be on the first flight should be released, we will tag them where appropriate.’

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