Is Uber Eats dying? Billion-dollar online takeaway food industry flattens out in Australia

The online takeaway food market is ‘flattening out’ as high-end restaurants claim customers are becoming more interested in the experience than the convenience. 

Research by Morgan Stanley has revealed the market grew only four per cent in May, after posting just a three per cent growth in March. 

This is a far cry from 2016 when the industry grew 56 per cent in a month. 

Scott Pickett, who owns high-end restaurants in Melbourne, told Fairfax the boom of companies like Deliveroo and Uber Eats hadn’t had much of an impact on his business and was ‘flattening out’. 

Research shows the online takeaway food market in Australia flatlined in April, the second time since January (stock image)

Research shows the online takeaway food market in Australia flatlined in April, the second time since January (stock image)

He said the rush towards outsourced delivery programs was similar to the rush towards big televisions, which were briefly thought to be threatening cinema. 

But Mr Picket said the factor that kept cinema alive would be the same thing to save fine dining – the experience. 

‘Somehow, the movies are still there and they are going strong because people want to go to the movies,’ he said. ‘They want to be treated. 

‘There are big parallels, you can sit on your couch and watch a movie or sit on the couch and eat a meal out of a box.’

While high end dining venues have been safe from a stampede of delivery riders, lower end venues have become awash with them. 

High-end restaurateur Scott Pickett (right) says the delivery apps, such as Uber Eats and Deliveroo, had not really impacted his business

High-end restaurateur Scott Pickett (right) says the delivery apps, such as Uber Eats and Deliveroo, had not really impacted his business

Pictures taken in Sydney around lunch time on Saturday show bike riders with insulated branded food bags on their backs waiting at popular venues like McDonalds for orders to begin streaming through.  

A recent Uber Eats study revealed that six out of 10 Australians considered ordering through a delivery app a ‘normal thing to do these days’. 

And a report produced by Deloitte for Uber Eats, estimates the online food delivery industry in Australia is worth $1.3billion in 2019 – the fourth biggest market in the Asia Pacific region. 

An Uber spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia last week more young people are using delivery apps then ever before because they increasingly ‘time poor’.  

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Uber for comment. 

Despite the latest figures, an Uber spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia that more young people are using delivery apps then ever before because they increasingly 'time poor'

Despite the latest figures, an Uber spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia that more young people are using delivery apps then ever before because they increasingly ‘time poor’

Source

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
    1
    Share
  •  
    1
    Share
  •  
  •  
  • 1

Related posts

Leave a Comment