Items Australians splurge on at Coles and Woolworths

The surprising expensive items that Aussies refuse to scrimp on despite tightening up their budgets as the cost of living SURGES

  • Australians have revealed the items they believe are well worth a splurge despite tightening up their budgets as the cost of living soars 
  • Hundreds confessed to paying top-dollar for food, coffee, toilet paper and pizza 
  • Others said it’s better to pay more for quality items than the cheaper alternatives

Australians have revealed the items they believe are well worth a splurge despite tightening up their budgets as the cost of living soars. 

Shoppers have often shared money saving tips and tricks online and as the cost of living increases – with the country recording its highest level of inflation in two decades – forums have been inundated with cost-cutting hacks.   

One Australian, who was frustrated by the endless budgeting lists, has asked fellow Aussies to share the items they refuse to ‘scrimp’ on in a Reddit post on Monday. 

In a post shared on Reddit, Australians explained they always pay top-dollar for bed linen, pillows and mattresses (STOCK, woman sleeping in comfortable bed with silk linen)

In a post shared on Reddit, Australians explained they always pay top-dollar for bed linen, pillows and mattresses (STOCK, woman sleeping in comfortable bed with silk linen)

Another reddit user confessed they splurge on good coffee as 'life's too short' for the cheaper alternative (STOCK barista making cappuccino)

Another reddit user confessed they splurge on good coffee as ‘life’s too short’ for the cheaper alternative (STOCK barista making cappuccino)

They wrote: ‘What things do you refuse to scrimp on?’ 

‘I always see posts about what people try and save on so let’s see the opposite.’ 

The Aussie explained they refused to budget on food as they ‘couldn’t imagine living off lentils’ and any items that go between them and the ground like beds, shoes, tires and office chairs.  

Reddit users agreed they splurge on quality food and good mattresses adding that any items contributing to mental and physical wellbeing were worthy of a higher price-tag. 

‘I bought my first good mattress a few years ago and still tell my bed how much I love it every night,’ one user wrote.    

‘A nice gym with everything you need, quality food and good sleep are the real three things to spend money on,’ another user commented. 

‘Things that aid in quality sleep/physical health/mental health/education/work performance,’ a third user wrote. 

Another user chimed: Health is wealth and life is short.’  

Other items which made the list were coffee, toilet paper and gourmet pizza. 

‘Life is too short to drink sh** coffee,’ on user joked. 

‘4 ply is the only toilet paper that will touch my beautiful a**,’ another user wrote. 

‘Pizza as life is to short to be eating Domino’s … make it yourself or get it from a good local pizza place,’ one user commented. 

‘I can no longer stomach pizzas from dominos and If I’m gonna spend money on takeaway pizza, I’m splurge and spent it on a quality pizza from a good pizza shop,’ another user agreed.  

Other users said they spend more on quality toilet paper (STOCK man holding toilet paper rolls)

Other users said they spend more on quality toilet paper (STOCK man holding toilet paper rolls)

Gourmet pizza also made the list of items that Aussies were willing to spend money (STOCK)

Gourmet pizza also made the list of items that Aussies were willing to spend money (STOCK)

Pictured is a woman eating pizza at Bella Brutta in the trendy suburb of Newtown, where a pizza costs $30

Pictured is a woman eating pizza at Bella Brutta in the trendy suburb of Newtown, where a pizza costs $30

Commenters noted they were happy to pay more quality as the item would likely last longer than its cheaper alternative. 

It comes after the Australian Bureau of Statistics released its quarterly Consumer Price Index (CPI) figures – the key measure of inflation – on July 27, showing a 6.1 per cent jump over the last year. 

It marks the steepest increase to inflation since mid-2001 and excluding the impact on the GST, the highest since the December quarter of 1990. 

WHAT AUSSIES REFUSE TO SKIMP ON 

Buy good quality first time, over research, procrastinate for a few months, more research – then buy the best fit for purpose. Took me almost a year to get my home stereo but bloody hell it’s amazing…!!!

Car & car maintenance

Dog food (good nutrition now is better than big vet bills later on)

Human food (I save money by shopping specials etc but I always prioritise healthy food over cost)

Work dresses with pockets, they’re worth their weight in gold lol

Pizza as life is to short to be eating Domino’s, seriously when they have tried to have this for work gatherings & try to get me to pay for this stuff I flat out refuse. Make it yourself or get it from a good local Pizza place.

The best obstetrician I could find for my wife and daughter.

Phone and service provider. I want the best tech (as I work in it) and coverage possible. Same goes for my laptop, screen, and ISP.

Parmigiano reggiano. It’s simply the best.

Pinot noir. You can’t make good cheap pinot.

Kitchen knives. They are buy for life and the good steel and design brings me joy and utility every day. My collection is probably worth ~2k at new.

Glasses and optometry. I don’t buy the most expensive glasses, but I do go to the optometrist often to check how my prescription is moving.

Mental health. I see a psychologist approx 6 times a year and a psychiatrist about the same.

Some tools. Hard to define the rule I work by here. But some of the top quality tools I’ve bought are: impact driver and drill; angle grinder, vice grips, clamps, multi-meter, EDC multi-tool, socket set, shifter. much of the rest of my workshop is bottom end use a dozen times kind of stuff.

 Life is too short to drink crap coffee (assuming you enjoy coffee)

Car tyres. So many people cheap out on them, or run them stupidly worn. It’s literally the point of contact between your couple tonne vehicle with you inside it, and the earth. Buy good tyres.

Tools. You buy good tools once and look after them, you never have to buy them again. And on the back of that, buying the right tool for the job is mostly always the best play. If you don’t want to pay for the tool, or it’s a one use thing, pay somebody to do it with the correct tool.

 Protein powder / any other supplements. The difference between supermarket/pharmacy crap that turns your innards into a clogged up fart trumpet, and properly made more expensive brands.. I order the Tasmanian brand every time in a bulk load.

I like to buy things that last long term, and are good quality. Mostly, this means that they are a higher price tag upfront, but cheaper over the much longer lifespan they ensure.

I purchase $500 linen sheets for our very expensive, 15-year warranty beds. I retired the first pair of linen sheets that I’d been given twenty years ago, last year. They were still pretty good. I’m only just retiring $200 bath sheets now that are ten years old and have been through the wash and four children at least weekly for that entire decade. I’ve only just replaced my twenty year old washing machine with a contemporary version that I happily paid $1300 for.

Essentially, I’d rather use things that were the best quality and most suitable for my needs and my families needs. I don’t mind saving up and waiting, rather than waste money and time buying a lesser item that’s broken or used faster. As a result, my impact on the environment and longer term impact on my finances is greatly lessened by doing this. I recognise that I am in a very privileged position to be able to do this, and that it’s more expensive to be poor, however, so I do understand that the notion of spending $1000 for two sheet sets upfront is ridiculous to most people, even though over their lifetime they cost $25 per set per year, or slightly less than a poly cotton king size sheet set from Kmart.

Health (extra for healthy quick food, gyms close to work/home), Work clothes (suits, shoes, even casual Friday) and all things related to sleep.

I’ve found that if I’m feeling good because of exercise/eating well and I think I look good in my clothes I’m more confident, happier and motivated. This in turn means I should be better at my job and creates more options financially in the future.

Spend money to make money?? IDK??

I’m seeing a lot of post about goods people are buying, which I mostly agree with.

For me something recently I’ve realised is exercise/sports for my young children. Giving them opportunities to try different sports, learn to swim safely and be part of a team environment is critical for me. I forget the research paper but they identified links to better health outcomes as adults for children who ‘learnt’ to enjoy exercise at a young age.

TLDR: spend a couple $100 p/m per child on sports/swimming lessons.

A good quality vacuum cleaner. It’s probably one of the only products I couldn’t compare to the cheaper version. Artisan sourdough? Nah just get the 50c coles bread. 500L french door fridge? Nah grab the 300L mini fridge. Same same, just need to work around it.

There’s almost always a reasonable cheaper edition of most products albeit maybe they cost more to run/own/ or they break down faster, cheap shoe soles etc, but cheap vacuums just don’t perform the same as their high quality counterparts.

Cant tell you how impossible it is to clean carpets with a hunk of junk with no suction.

 Food and stuff for kids. Swimming and karate, birthday parties and clothes. I think food is my biggest expenditure, more than mortgage but my kids can eat! Birthday parties are something simple like ZoneBowling and clothes are Kmart/Target/BigW brand but I buy them seasonally and their shoes as needed. Raising kids is expensive.

 

 

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What’s gone up the most in Australia in the last year?

Transport +13.1%

  • (Includes fuel, car repairs, train/bus/ferry costs) 

Non-durable household products  +10.7%

  • (Includes toilet roll, hair, dental, razors, all cleaning products)

Housing +9%

  • (Includes: new homes, rent, electricity, gas, water) 

Non-alcoholic beverages +7.9%

  • (Includes coffee, tea, soft drinks, juice)

Fruit and vegetables +7.3%

Bread, cereal +6.3%

  • (Includes breads, breakfast cereals, biscuits, rice, oats, flour) 

Meats and seafood +6.3%

  • (Excluding pork) 

Furnishings, household equipment and services +6.3%

  • (Includes haircuts, child care, appliances, tools, furniture, flooring, linen)

Other food products +6.1%

(Includes: eggs, herbs, spices, sauces) 

Milk, cheese, ice cream +5.2% 

Furious shoppers see their supermarket bills surge

Tina Khan told Daily Mail Australia buying the ingredients for an Italian rice dish to feed a family of five pushed her grocery bill into the three-digit figures.

‘Today I was just getting ingredients to make my son risotto,’ she said.

‘I just bought a few things and it was $138.’

Ms Khan has even tried buying her fruit and vegetables in bulk to save money.

Tina Khan said buying the ingredients for an Italian rice dish pushed her grocery bill into the three-digit figures

Tina Khan said buying the ingredients for an Italian rice dish pushed her grocery bill into the three-digit figures

‘I pay a lot a week because normally every one or two days I go grocery shopping,’ she said. 

‘Each shop does not have everything I need. I didn’t buy any vegetables. I still need to get the vegetables.’

Ms Khan now has to shop three or four times a week to keep her grocery bill down. 

‘Today I didn’t find any nice fresh vegetables here so I might go to another suburb,’ she said.

‘Before I used to go to one place to do my shopping, but now things have changed. 

Tina said she bought just items, like cooking oil, bread, risotto rice, and bottled water, that she could only get at supermarkets

Tina said she bought just items, like cooking oil, bread, risotto rice, and bottled water, that she could only get at supermarkets

‘Now I make three or four trips a week. It’s time wasting.’ 

 

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics  

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