Jamie Dornan confesses he was moved by emotional Derry Girls finale


‘I get emotional talking about it’: Jamie Dornan confesses he sent Derry Girls creator Lisa McGee a ‘soppy text’ after being moved by poignant finale

Jamie Dornan has admitted he felt ‘very emotional’ after watching the poignant finale of Northern Ireland-based drama Derry Girls.

The Northern Ireland native, 40, said he sent a ‘soppy text’ to the Channel 4 creator Lisa McGee after watching the final episode.

The episode captures the sense of hope in 1998 at the signing of the Good Friday Agreement following decades of violence in the country.

Poignant: Jamie Dornan has admitted he felt 'very emotional' after watching the poignant finale of Northern Ireland-based drama Derry Girls

Poignant: Jamie Dornan has admitted he felt ‘very emotional’ after watching the poignant finale of Northern Ireland-based drama Derry Girls

Speaking at the Our Time In Space event at the Lyric Theatre in Belfast, he said the  girls taking part in cross community programmes reminded him of his school days going on a trip to the Share Centre in Co Fermanagh.

He explained: ‘I massively identified with Derry Girls, I get emotional talking about the finale. I know Lisa well, that’s about the soppiest text I have ever sent to anybody when I finished the finale…

‘Trying to tackle the nuanced complications of being from this part of the world at that time with such integrity and such humour is almost impossible, I don’t know how she managed to do it, it’s incredible and so poignant.’

Jamie said that those in his generation are currently making the decision of where to send their own children to school, admitting that they are in a ‘post-conflict society and your decision making on where to send your kids has altered.’

Finale: The Northern Ireland native, 40, said he sent a 'soppy text' to the Channel 4 creator Lisa McGee after watching the final episode (pictured the cast of Derry Girls)

Finale: The Northern Ireland native, 40, said he sent a ‘soppy text’ to the Channel 4 creator Lisa McGee after watching the final episode (pictured the cast of Derry Girls)

Set in 1998, in the week of the referendum on the Good Friday Agreement, which set out a peace accord for the troubled factions in Northern Ireland, the episode explored the real-life tensions of the time while offering light relief as Erin and Orla attempted to throw a joint 18th birthday party.

In classic Derry Girls’ style, things didn’t quite go to plan when their mothers forgot to book out the community hall so they have to share it with a group of young girls celebrating their first communion.

Things continue to spiral as the friends’ nemesis Jenny Joyce hosts her birthday on the same day, stealing all their guests in the process with the promise of champagne, a magician and Riverdance.

Moment in history: The episode captures the sense of hope in 1998 at the signing of the Good Friday Agreement following decades of violence in the country

Moment in history: The episode captures the sense of hope in 1998 at the signing of the Good Friday Agreement following decades of violence in the country

Nostalgic: Speaking at the Our Time In Space event at the Lyric Theatre in Belfast, he said the girls taking part in cross community programmes reminded him of his school days going on a trip to the Share Centre in Co Fermanagh

Nostalgic: Speaking at the Our Time In Space event at the Lyric Theatre in Belfast, he said the girls taking part in cross community programmes reminded him of his school days going on a trip to the Share Centre in Co Fermanagh

The group also faces tension as Erin and Michelle have an argument about the peace agreement as Erin feels it is not right that paramilitary prisoners could be released as part of the conditions while Michelle reminds her that her brother is in jail for such a crime.

Clare, who has moved away following her father’s death, later comes to save the day by sabotaging the electrics at Jenny’s party so they all have to relocate to Erin and Orla’s party.

As the episode draws to a close, Erin reflects on the importance of growing up and moving on.

He explained: 'I massively identified with Derry Girls, I get emotional talking about the finale. I know Lisa well, that's about the soppiest text I have ever sent to anybody when I finished the finale...'

He explained: ‘I massively identified with Derry Girls, I get emotional talking about the finale. I know Lisa well, that’s about the soppiest text I have ever sent to anybody when I finished the finale…’

The message becomes particularly poignant for the end of the comedy series and the historical moment as she speaks over video footage of The Troubles and discussions had by key political characters including former prime minister Tony Blair, former Northern Ireland first minister and DUP leader Ian Paisley and former deputy first minister and Sinn Fein politician Martin McGuinness.

During his appearance at the event, Jamie also hit out at the current impasse at Stormont, describing the local politics as a ‘shambles’.

He said: ‘They are not the conversations we should be having. It’s ultimately really damaging.’

‘Obviously Brexit has called into question so many uncomfortable truths for people here, questions about the very case of how you identify has been upended by Brexit and suddenly all these people who, all they care about is feeling British, feel like they are undermined by not feeling British enough. It’s a mess, that’s not changing.’

Jamie said that those in his generation are currently making the decision of where to send their own children to school, admitting that they are in a 'post-conflict society and your decision making on where to send your kids has altered' (pictured with Baroness May Blood, Oliver Jeffers and Film Hub NI's Hugh Odling-Smee)

Jamie said that those in his generation are currently making the decision of where to send their own children to school, admitting that they are in a ‘post-conflict society and your decision making on where to send your kids has altered’ (pictured with Baroness May Blood, Oliver Jeffers and Film Hub NI’s Hugh Odling-Smee)

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