Japanese grandmother shares the VERY elaborate meal she eats every morning for breakfast

A chef has revealed a typical meal his Japanese grandmother eats every morning for breakfast – complete with fish, miso soup and a raw egg.

The man, from Kyoto but now lives in the Philippines, shared a picture on social media showing a bowl of white rice, tofu with dried bonito flakes, pan-fried fish, miso soup, pickled vegetables, a raw egg and fermented soy beans called ‘natto’. 

‘My Japanese grandmother made a traditional Japanese breakfast. I think the reason why Japanese people live longer is because they eat healthy breakfast every day. There are some unusual and unique dishes,’ he wrote on Facebook.

A chef has revealed a typical meal his Japanese grandmother eats every morning for breakfast - complete with fish, rice, miso soup, pickled vegetables, a raw egg  and tofu with bonito flakes

A chef has revealed a typical meal his Japanese grandmother eats every morning for breakfast – complete with fish, rice, miso soup, pickled vegetables, a raw egg  and tofu with bonito flakes

Dozens of people responded to the thread, with one saying: ‘If my breakfast looked this good I’d actually start eating breakfast.’

One traveller said she experienced a culture shock when she was served an elaborate breakfast at her hotel in Japan.

‘I was shocked when I saw the Japanese breakfast served at some hotels in Japan. It was dinner for me. But they say breakfast is the most important meal of the day,’ she wrote.

Elaborate traditional breakfasts are very common in Japan, with raw eggs with rice and fermented soy beans considered as some of the popular go-to dishes.

Raw eggs cracked over a bowl of hot rice and soy sauce is a very popular dish in Japanese diet as it’s safe to eat because chickens are tested and vaccinated for bacterial infections daily under strict procedures and regulations.

According to Tsunaga Japan, eggs are thoroughly tested through a machine that individually washes, sterilises and checks for any traces of cracks, dirt, blood spots and bacteria. Eggs with imperfections are discarded.

Elaborate traditional breakfasts are very common in Japan (stock image of a typical Japanese meal with pan-fried fish, steamed pork with rice, miso soup and pickled vegetables)

Elaborate traditional breakfasts are very common in Japan (stock image of a typical Japanese meal with pan-fried fish, steamed pork with rice, miso soup and pickled vegetables)

Japanese researchers previously found in a study that middle-aged adults who regularly eat natto or miso paste added to sushi and soup were 10 per cent less likely to die an early death.

Miso, which means ‘fermented beans’, is a paste added to sushi, soups and salad dressings while natto is fermented soybeans which are sticky and stringy.

The researchers claimed this was likely to be because the products are high in beneficial compounds which help keep cholesterol stable, for example. 

Nearly 100,000 people in Japan were surveyed about their diet and then tracked for 15 years during the research.

What are the foods Japanese eat to boost life expectancy?

It’s widely known that the Japanese live long and healthy lives and experts believe it’s down to their immaculate diet.

1. Fish: Fish are a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, responsible for keeping the heart healthy. But not only do they keep the blood flowing, they also benefit the brain, eyes and reduce inflammation. Fish are rich in selenium, which is vital for our antioxidant defences and immune system, and B vitamins that help to keep our brain chemistry in balance.

2. Seaweed: Seaweed is rich in minerals, including iodine, zinc, magnesium, calcium, potassium and dozens of other trace minerals we need for our immune system, antioxidant defences and heart health.

3. Matcha tea: Matcha is a traditional powdered green tea made from the fresh leaf tips of the tea plant. Green tea – matcha in particular – is high in a specific type of flavanols called catechins. These substances are thought to boost our body’s antioxidant defences.

4. Pickled vegetables: Traditionally fermented pickled vegetables are a great source of natural probiotics. They can favour digestive health, help to digest and absorb the nutrients in the food we eat, which then benefits all areas of our health.

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