Jennifer Grey, 62, looks UNRECOGNIZABLE transforming into cult leader Gwen Shamblin

‘Call me Gwen’: Dirty Dancing star Jennifer Grey, 62, looks UNRECOGNIZABLE transforming into cult leader Gwen Shamblin for new role

Jennifer Grey has shared a sneak peek of her transformation into Christian cult leader Gwen Shamblin for the upcoming Lifetime series Starving for Salvation.

The Dirty Dancing actress, 62, was unrecognizable channeling the late diet guru with her signature voluminous blonde hair style.

She cast a cold and expressionless face in a photo shared to her Instagram account on Monday.

'Call me Gwen': Jennifer Grey has shared a sneak peek of her transformation into Christian cult leader Gwen Shamblin for the upcoming Lifetime film Starving for Salvation

‘Call me Gwen’: Jennifer Grey has shared a sneak peek of her transformation into Christian cult leader Gwen Shamblin for the upcoming Lifetime film Starving for Salvation

‘call me gwen #starvingforsalvation #gwenshamblin @lifetime wig: @robpickens hair: @lynelapiana monitor grab: @nancydarabennett,’ Jennifer captioned the photo.

Jennifer appeared to share another glimpse at her new role with a photo shared last week.

In the image, Jennifer rocked the same blonde hairstyle and heavy dose of makeup while wrapped up in leopard print.

‘up to no good in montreal,’ she captioned the image.

Coming soon: Jennifer's new film is set for release early next year; pictured May 2022

Coming soon: Jennifer’s new film is set for release early next year; pictured May 2022 

Starving For Salvation will chronicle the controversial late diet guru, who died last year when her plane crashed into a lake. 

The new Lifetime film is set to follow Shamblin’s success with her diet program, her megachurch Remnant Fellowship, along with her death, according to E!

The film follows the release of the HBO Max documentary The Way Down, which spoke with survivors of the church and the horrifying details of the diets and brainwashing they faced.

Sarah Paulson will also be playing Gwen in a scripted adaptation of the HBO Max doc, according to Deadline

Raised in the ultra-strict Church of Christ, Shamblin was a trained dietician who started her Weigh Down Workshops in the 1980s. The Weigh Down Workshops were held in churches and as word of mouth spread, grew to more than 250,000 subscribers in over 14,000 churches in 70 countries.

'Up to no good in Montreal': In the image, Jennifer rocked the same blonde hairstyle and heavy dose of makeup while wrapped up in leopard print

‘Up to no good in Montreal’: In the image, Jennifer rocked the same blonde hairstyle and heavy dose of makeup while wrapped up in leopard print

Controversial: Starving For Salvation will chronicle the late diet guru Gwen Shamblin, who died last year when her plane crashed into a lake

Controversial: Starving For Salvation will chronicle the late diet guru Gwen Shamblin, who died last year when her plane crashed into a lake

She expanded her business throughout the 1990s with a merchandise, t-shirts, hats and a slew of books such as: What would Jesus eat?, The Divine Diet and Body by God. Her 1997 juggernaut was a book she published titled The Weigh Down Diet.

Shamblin and her Weigh Down Diet were a ‘massive media hit,’ Rev. Rafael Martinez, a cult interventionist said on the program. The book sold over 400,000 copies and Shamblin was seen everywhere from 20/20 to Larry King on CNN. She also embarked on national tours where followers would appear onstage holding up their larger clothes for a cheering audience: ‘God has taken 86 pounds off of me!’

Putting a biblical spin on her approach, Shamblin taught people to ‘Honor God within your body.’

‘Every time you reach for food, 15 to 20 times a day, run to God instead,’ she’d say.

Raised in the ultra-strict Church of Christ, Shamblin was a trained dietician who started her Weigh Down Workshops in the 1980s. The Weigh Down Workshops were held in churches and as word of mouth spread, grew to more than 250,000 subscribers in over 14,000 churches in 70 countries

Raised in the ultra-strict Church of Christ, Shamblin was a trained dietician who started her Weigh Down Workshops in the 1980s. The Weigh Down Workshops were held in churches and as word of mouth spread, grew to more than 250,000 subscribers in over 14,000 churches in 70 countries

In reality, her weight-loss approach was a dressed up version of intuitive eating, a decades-old practice of only eating when you’re hungry. Martinez said: ‘To her, it was divine revelation.’

Terasseee Morris said that she started losing weight immediately. ‘I me an like within two months, I had lost 27 pounds. So the program itself works and it’s simply proportion control.’

In 1999, Shamblin founded Remnant Fellowship Church in Brentwood, Tennessee, with the emphasis on ‘helping people turn away from the love of food and toward a love of God.’

Morris, who lost 138 pounds in 18 months, said that she was told to stop eating to lose more weight. If people didn’t lose more than two pounds that week, they were instructed to fast. ‘The faster you do it, the holier you are,’ she said.

The film follows the release of the HBO Max documentary The Way Down, which spoke with survivors of the church and the horrifying details of the diets and brainwashing they faced

The film follows the release of the HBO Max documentary The Way Down, which spoke with survivors of the church and the horrifying details of the diets and brainwashing they faced

Soon thereafter, Shamblin began preaching that her weight-loss creed was effective at curing all the other perceived ills of the world, touting that Remnant members were able to break ‘free from slavery, to drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, overeating and overspending.’

‘I got counselled that, ‘You need to loose about four pounds a week in order to be in God’s good will,” said Laura Alvarez, in the second installment of The Way Down.

‘So then they put me at 10-bites-a-day,’ she says. She was also told to fast every other month with absolutely no food, except for a few sips of broth.

The extreme starvation diet caused so much damage to Alvarez’s body that she got sick when she was pregnant for the first time. When doctors performed a biopsy, they asked if she struggled with bulimia or anorexia. ‘I said, ‘I starve myself,’ and they said, ‘Your body ate away its kidneys, that’s what it does when you go through starvation.”

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