Julia Bradbury enjoys a yoga session as she says ‘it’s OK to have slow days’


‘There are days when this is all I can manage’: Julia Bradbury enjoys a yoga session as she says ‘it’s OK to have slow days’ after having a mastectomy following breast cancer diagnosis

Julia Bradbury took some time to herself on Tuesday as she enjoyed a yoga session as she said ‘it’s ok to have slow days after having a mastectomy.

The Countryfile presenter, 51, underwent the procedure after being diagnosed with breast cancer last year, which she documented for a one-off fly on the wall special, Julia Bradbury Breast Cancer and Me.

The TV star, who has previously credited exercise, with aiding her recovery opened up about the experience in a social media message, telling fans: ‘Some days this is all I can manage’.

'There are days when this is all I can manage': Julia Bradbury took some time to herself on Tuesday as she enjoyed a yoga session as she said 'it's ok to have slow days after having a mastectomy

‘There are days when this is all I can manage’: Julia Bradbury took some time to herself on Tuesday as she enjoyed a yoga session as she said ‘it’s ok to have slow days after having a mastectomy

Julia, who was diagnosed with cancer in September last year, looked sensation in a pair of black legging and matching sports bra.

The TV presenter, who was wearing black gym wear, can be seen sitting on the floor in a cross-legged pose as she leant forward to the ground.

Julia wrote: ‘There are days when this is all I can manage physically…& that’s OK. It’s OK to have slow days & less active days.

Wow: The Countryfile presenter, 51, underwent the procedure after being diagnosed with breast cancer last year, which she documented for a one-off fly on the wall special, Julia Bradbury Breast Cancer and Me

Wow: The Countryfile presenter, 51, underwent the procedure after being diagnosed with breast cancer last year, which she documented for a one-off fly on the wall special, Julia Bradbury Breast Cancer and Me

Incredible: The TV star, who has previously credited exercise, with aiding her recovery opened up about the experience in a social media message, telling fans: 'Some days this is all I can manage'

Incredible: The TV star, who has previously credited exercise, with aiding her recovery opened up about the experience in a social media message, telling fans: ‘Some days this is all I can manage’

‘Listening to your body is important. I’ll take a gentle walk to the park when work allows, to get my outdoor time. 

‘Learning when and how to be gentle with yourself can be difficult, but I’m understanding more and more that sometimes “powering on through” is counter productive.’

She concluded: ‘You get less done, feel worse & can cause damage. Sending healing vibes to you all. Namaste.’

Opening up: Julia, who was diagnosed with cancer in September last year, detailed how she is 'learning when and how to be gentle' with herself which can be 'difficult'

Opening up: Julia, who was diagnosed with cancer in September last year, detailed how she is ‘learning when and how to be gentle’ with herself which can be ‘difficult’ 

It comes as Julia told how there’s a ‘chance of recurrence’ for her breast cancer, of which she was first diagnosed in September last year.

Speaking during Wednesday’s Loose Women, she opened up about her health battle, telling the panel: ‘It genuinely is something that stays with you forever’.

During the interview, Julia, who recently shared her journey in her new ITV documentary, also told how she felt ‘guilty’ about her diagnosis and for bringing cancer into the lives of her loved ones

Health battle: It comes as Julia told how there's a 'chance of recurrence' for her breast cancer and said 'It genuinely is something that stays with you forever'

Health battle: It comes as Julia told how there’s a ‘chance of recurrence’ for her breast cancer and said ‘It genuinely is something that stays with you forever’

Lovely: Discussing her show, titled Breast Cancer And Me, Julia explained how she was happy to show just how 'vulnerable' she was amid her cancer battle

Lovely: Discussing her show, titled Breast Cancer And Me, Julia explained how she was happy to show just how ‘vulnerable’ she was amid her cancer battle

Discussing her show, titled Breast Cancer And Me, Julia explained how she was happy to show just how ‘vulnerable’ she was amid her cancer battle, before then admitting that there is a chance it could come back.

She said: ‘I think generally people were quite surprised at how vulnerable I appeared to be. I was happy to show that side.

‘Kelly Close [director] wanted it to be personal, touching and emotional. We don’t talk a lot about the emotional impact of having cancer. It’s a big thing psychologically to deal with.

‘It genuinely is something that stays with you forever. There is a chance of recurrence.’

It comes after Julia tearfully detailed how she had to say goodbye to her children three days before her mastectomy and how she struggled with losing her breast in her new documentary, Breast Cancer And Me.

Fearful: 'It genuinely is something that stays with you forever. There is a chance of recurrence'

Fearful: ‘It genuinely is something that stays with you forever. There is a chance of recurrence’

Opening up: The presenter then went on to express her guilt at her diagnosis, telling how the diseased 'crashed' into the lives of her loved ones

Opening up: The presenter then went on to express her guilt at her diagnosis, telling how the diseased ‘crashed’ into the lives of her loved ones

The TV veteran explained that due to coronavirus restrictions she was unable to see her kids and husband Joe Cunningham before the operation, as she opened up about her experience and recalled how her children asked her if her condition was ‘contagious like Covid’.

Mother of three Julia has candidly shared her journey with ITV viewers after first learning she had cancer in September last year, admitting that she ‘didn’t feel she had a choice’ about going public with the diagnosis.

During her experience, Julia filmed a video diary and explained how she had to hold her children for the last time three days before the surgery, she said: ‘I started self-isolating this morning. I took all my kids to school and waved goodbye at the gates. Then we all knew that I wouldn’t be able to hug them again until after the operation.

Lovely: Julia cut a stylish figure during her TV appearance, teaming a white blazer with a patterned white camisole and loose-fitting trousers

Lovely: Julia cut a stylish figure during her TV appearance, teaming a white blazer with a patterned white camisole and loose-fitting trousers

‘It’s an extra layer of complication that makes this horrible process even s****er. I don’t mind saying that I’m scared now and now it’s real dread that I’m feeling. You hope it’s a dream and you’re wrong.’

Julia was also lauded by fans as she went topless to reveal the results of her mastectomy and reconstruction. 

She said: ‘I haven’t stood in front of the mirror as I wanted to feel emotionally ready and needed time to heal.

Taking a deep breath, Julia took off her bra and said: ‘There you go, there’s my new boob. Ok well it looks like a boob. It looks like a big lumpy boob.

Operation:  It comes after Julia tearfully detailed how she had to say goodbye to her children three days before her mastectomy in her new documentary, Breast Cancer And Me

Operation:  It comes after Julia tearfully detailed how she had to say goodbye to her children three days before her mastectomy in her new documentary, Breast Cancer And Me

‘Can’t feel that at all, it might come back one day, the sensation, but I can’t feel my fingertips. It looks like a plasticine boob at the moment. It’s going to take a bit of getting used to.’ 

The hour-long documentary opened with Julia filming a woodland segment for This Morning, when she was awaiting the results of a recent biopsy – but she refused to take the call while away from home because there was nobody she felt ‘close to’ that would be able to support her.

Julia said: ‘I was away with a new team, up trees and there were emails back and forth about when I could take this call to hear the results of a biopsy I’d had done a week before, on a lump in my left breast.

Family first: Julia, who shares her kids - Zephyr, 10, and twins Xanthe and Zena, both seven, with husband Joe Cunningham, kept her diagnosis hidden for a while because she didn't want her children to hear the news from anyone else

Family first: Julia, who shares her kids – Zephyr, 10, and twins Xanthe and Zena, both seven, with husband Joe Cunningham, kept her diagnosis hidden for a while because she didn’t want her children to hear the news from anyone else

So brave: Julia was lauded by fans as she went topless on camera after the mastectomy- as she checked out her new breast

So brave: Julia was lauded by fans as she went topless on camera after the mastectomy- as she checked out her new breast

‘I knew I wouldn’t be able to take the call because I wasn’t prepared for it to be bad news and I wasn’t with someone I knew, to be able to ask to take some time out to process it.

After waiting to take the call at home, Julia recalls how she was told their was a ‘big tumour’ in her left breast, adding: ‘So I thought I’d delay that until I was back. I was ready for the call and I was here at home, it was a sunny day and my consultant called and said you do have cancer. And it’s a big tumour.’

Julia, who shares her kids – Zephyr, 10, and twins Xanthe and Zena, both seven, with husband Joe Cunningham, kept her diagnosis hidden for a while because she didn’t want her children to hear the news from anyone else.

Devastating: Mother of three Julia has candidly shared her journey with ITV viewers after first learning she had cancer in September last year, admitting that she 'didn't feel she had a choice' about going public with the diagnosis

Devastating: Mother of three Julia has candidly shared her journey with ITV viewers after first learning she had cancer in September last year, admitting that she ‘didn’t feel she had a choice’ about going public with the diagnosis

She said: ‘When you hear the words ‘you’ve got cancer’, your world stops. It is like moving instantly into slow motion. Just thought s**t, okay, I’ve got to live. I need and want to be here.

‘I didn’t want the information about my breast cancer to be out there before I told my children, I didn’t want them to hear mummy’s got cancer from someone else. I kept it to myself until I made sure everything was right at home with my family.’

Last month, Julia returned to This Morning, four months after her mastectomy and revealed her ‘healing is going very well’ as she continues to battle breast cancer.

The TV presenter told hosts Alison Hammond and Rochelle Humes: ‘Today I was ready!’ as she appeared down the line from the This Morning’s Forest.

Julia – who was unveiling the new ‘Plant A Tree’ campaign – was asked by the show’s hosts if she felt ready to be back at work, to which she responded with a smile.

She said: ‘First of all I wanna say thanks to the whole of the This Morning team – you’ve been checking in with me regularly to check how I’m doing.

‘And it is lovely to be back and you’ve been sending me little messages saying “are you ready? are you ready?”

‘And, today I was ready because it’s a beautiful morning in the forest and I wanted to help give away these trees. The doctor said “yes it’s alright”.

‘I’m recovering. I had a mastectomy a couple of months ago. I’ve been having lots of physio and lots of treatment. My healing is going very well thank you.

‘I’m taking this opportunity to suck in the green therapy. And I’m going to go for a little walk around the forest when we’ve finished here this morning.’

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and affects more than two MILLION women a year

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Each year in the UK there are more than 55,000 new cases, and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women. In the US, it strikes 266,000 each year and kills 40,000. But what causes it and how can it be treated?

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer develops from a cancerous cell which develops in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the breasts.

When the breast cancer has spread into surrounding breast tissue it is called an ‘invasive’ breast cancer. Some people are diagnosed with ‘carcinoma in situ’, where no cancer cells have grown beyond the duct or lobule.

Most cases develop in women over the age of 50 but younger women are sometimes affected. Breast cancer can develop in men though this is rare.

Staging means how big the cancer is and whether it has spread. Stage 1 is the earliest stage and stage 4 means the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

The cancerous cells are graded from low, which means a slow growth, to high, which is fast growing. High grade cancers are more likely to come back after they have first been treated.

What causes breast cancer?

A cancerous tumour starts from one abnormal cell. The exact reason why a cell becomes cancerous is unclear. It is thought that something damages or alters certain genes in the cell. This makes the cell abnormal and multiply ‘out of control’.

Although breast cancer can develop for no apparent reason, there are some risk factors that can increase the chance of developing breast cancer, such as genetics.

What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The usual first symptom is a painless lump in the breast, although most breast lumps are not cancerous and are fluid filled cysts, which are benign. 

The first place that breast cancer usually spreads to is the lymph nodes in the armpit. If this occurs you will develop a swelling or lump in an armpit.

How is breast cancer diagnosed?

  • Initial assessment: A doctor examines the breasts and armpits. They may do tests such as a mammography, a special x-ray of the breast tissue which can indicate the possibility of tumours.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy is when a small sample of tissue is removed from a part of the body. The sample is then examined under the microscope to look for abnormal cells. The sample can confirm or rule out cancer.

If you are confirmed to have breast cancer, further tests may be needed to assess if it has spread. For example, blood tests, an ultrasound scan of the liver or a chest x-ray.

How is breast cancer treated?

Treatment options which may be considered include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone treatment. Often a combination of two or more of these treatments are used.

  • Surgery: Breast-conserving surgery or the removal of the affected breast depending on the size of the tumour.
  • Radiotherapy: A treatment which uses high energy beams of radiation focussed on cancerous tissue. This kills cancer cells, or stops cancer cells from multiplying. It is mainly used in addition to surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: A treatment of cancer by using anti-cancer drugs which kill cancer cells, or stop them from multiplying
  • Hormone treatments: Some types of breast cancer are affected by the ‘female’ hormone oestrogen, which can stimulate the cancer cells to divide and multiply. Treatments which reduce the level of these hormones, or prevent them from working, are commonly used in people with breast cancer.

How successful is treatment?

The outlook is best in those who are diagnosed when the cancer is still small, and has not spread. Surgical removal of a tumour in an early stage may then give a good chance of cure.

The routine mammography offered to women between the ages of 50 and 70 mean more breast cancers are being diagnosed and treated at an early stage.

For more information visit breastcancercare.org.uk, breastcancernow.org or www.cancerhelp.org.uk

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