Kate raises eyebrows as she says ‘talking therapies don’t work for everyone’ during hospital visit

Who COULD she be talking about? Kate raises eyebrows as she tells teens ‘talking therapies don’t work for everyone’ during hospital visit after psychoanalysis fan Prince Harry’s book was launched

  • Kate Middleton said that ‘talking therapies don’t work for some’ during outing 
  • The Prince and Princess of Wales avoided question about Prince Harry’s book
  • In his memoir Spare, the Duke of Sussex mentions therapy multiple times

Kate Middleton raised eyebrows during her first public outing since Prince Harry‘s memoir was released by commenting that therapy does not work for everyone

The Prince and Princess of Wales were in Merseyside yesterday visiting mental health charity Open Door, when Kate said: ‘Talking therapies don’t work for some.’

In Prince Harry’s shocking autobiography Spare he references therapy multiple times and even thanks collection of therapists in the acknowledgements.

In the book he claims that his older brother William believed he was being ‘brainwashed’ by the therapist he was seeing.

The Duke of Sussex says his sibling was so worried about what he was being exposed to at his confidential sessions that he even asked to come along to one.

The Prince and Princess of Wales visited the new Royal Liverpool University Hospital, where Kate told several teenagers that talking therapies 'don't work for everyone'

The Prince and Princess of Wales visited the new Royal Liverpool University Hospital, where Kate told several teenagers that talking therapies ‘don’t work for everyone’

The Princess of Wales chats to medics and visited Open Door Charity - who use arts and dance to help with well-being

The Princess of Wales chats to medics and visited Open Door Charity – who use arts and dance to help with well-being

Prince Harry, pictured here doing exercises in a therapy session, claims he called his therapist after a physical bust-up with his brother William

Prince Harry, pictured here doing exercises in a therapy session, claims he called his therapist after a physical bust-up with his brother William

Will and Kate met several teenagers at the Open Door Charity, who use arts and dance to help with mental health.

The Sun reported that Kate asked: ‘Has producing music and taking part in those workshops helped? Has it helped with your personal lives?’

One boy replied that using music as a tool helps him express his emotions through something he enjoys.

He said: ‘Producing music and letting out what you’re feeling is better than saying it in a clinical atmosphere. I can put it into words. That was tough to explain!’

Kate said: ‘Talking therapies don’t work for some people, they’re not for everybody. It’s so important to have a range of therapies.’

She added: ‘Everyone is talking a lot more about mental health.

‘There have often been negative connotations around it. But if we get across that there are these more positive spaces and experiences out there, then we are changing how we talk about it.’

A smiling Kate smiles for the cameras during the visit this afternoon

A smiling Kate smiles for the cameras during the visit this afternoon 

Prince Harry wrote in his book that he called his therapist after being physically attacked by his brother William following a heated argument.

The Duke of Sussex claims that his older sibling left him with visible injuries after a furious row over his wife Meghan Markle.

In one section of the book, Harry claims immediately following the argument he called his therapist instead of his wife.

The Prince and Princess of Wales have so far avoided commenting on any of the outlandish claims levied against them in the book.

While at the Liverpool Royal Hospital a journalist queried: ‘Have you had a chance to read your brother’s book?’

William, who has been at the centre of attacks by his younger sibling, ignored the question, prompting Mr Rashid to ask again: ‘Have you had a chance to read your brother’s again your Royal Highness?’

A smiling William and Kate continued on, walking past the reporter without acknowledging his question.

Harry has previously spoken of going to therapy to process the trauma of his childhood, which included the death of his mother, Princess Diana.

The Duke praised EMDR – which stands for Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing – for helping him deal with his past.

It is based on the principle that the mind can heal from trauma by using external stimuli to help the brain process traumatic experiences and facilitate healing.

Prince Harry, 36, previously shared a video of him closing his eyes and tapping his chest during a therapy session via videolink with Sanja Oakley, a UK-based psychotherapist, which aired on his Apple TV+ show. 

Appearing on The Me You Can’t See, Harry ‘processed his negative thoughts’ by crossing his arms and taking in a deep breath, before closing his eyes and slowly tapping each side of his chest.

The Duke of Sussex closes his eyes during a therapy session shown in an Apple TV documentary series

The Duke of Sussex closes his eyes during a therapy session shown in an Apple TV documentary series

He told Oprah: ‘EMDR is always something that I’ve wanted to try and that was one of the varieties of different forms of healing or curing that I was willing to experiment with.

‘And I never would have been open to that had I not put in the work and the therapy that I’ve done over the years.’

Devotees say simply moving your eyes from left to right between 25 and 30 times can diminish negative memories and, therefore, their impact on your wellbeing.

This, done repeatedly with a trained psychologist – up to 40 times in an hour session – can change your life immeasurably for the better, so experts claim.

While critics have dismissed it as pseudoscience, EMDR has a body of scientific research behind it that proves it to be effective for the treatment of severe trauma.

Not only is it available on the NHS, but training is compulsory for Ministry of Defence mental health personnel on the front line.

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