Kate Winslet dons military jumpsuit on the Budapest set of new film about photojournalist Lee Miller

Kate Winslet wears a military jumpsuit on the Budapest set of new film about photojournalist Lee Miller – who posed in Adolf Hitler’s bathtub and documented horrors of Nazi Germany

Kate Winslet got stuck into character on Sunday while filming her new movie Lee, for the second time after being hospitalised due to a leg injury on set last week.

The actress, 47, was clad in a 1940s US military costume for the filming, featuring a khaki jumpsuit with a thick belt and lighter green calf chaps as she took on the role of Lee Miller, a model who became a photographer in the Second World War. 

She seemed to be back to full health as she got firmly into work mode for the filming – which is taking place in Budapest – after a shoot in the village of Kupari, Croatia.

In-character: Kate Winslet got stuck into character on Sunday while filming her new movie Lee, after being hospitalised due to a leg injury on set last week

In-character: Kate Winslet got stuck into character on Sunday while filming her new movie Lee, after being hospitalised due to a leg injury on set last week

The historical biopic chronicles the life of Vogue model turned World War II correspondent Lee Miller, who Kate portrays as she stars alongside actors including Jude Law and Marion Cotillard.

Lee famously posed for a photograph in Adolf Hitler’s bathtub in his Munich apartment and became the official war photographer for Vogue, documenting the Blitz and recording the Siege of the heavily fortified city of St Malo.

After returning to the UK post-war, Lee buried the record of her wartime work in boxes in the attic of her Sussex home and her photographs were not discovered until they were found after her death by her son.

Busy bee: The actress, 47, was clad in a 1940s US military costume for the filming, featuring a khaki jumpsuit with a thick belt and lighter green calf chaps as she took on the role of Lee Miller, a model who became a photographer in the Second World War

Busy bee: The actress, 47, was clad in a 1940s US military costume for the filming, featuring a khaki jumpsuit with a thick belt and lighter green calf chaps as she took on the role of Lee Miller, a model who became a photographer in the Second World War

Talented: She seemed to be back to full health as she got firmly into work mode for the filming - which is taking place in Budapest - after a shoot in the village of Kupari, Croatia

Talented: She seemed to be back to full health as she got firmly into work mode for the filming – which is taking place in Budapest – after a shoot in the village of Kupari, Croatia

Exciting: The historical biopic chronicles the life of Vogue model turned World War II correspondent Lee Miller, who Kate portrays as she stars alongside actors including Jude Law and Marion Cotillard

Exciting: The historical biopic chronicles the life of Vogue model turned World War II correspondent Lee Miller, who Kate portrays as she stars alongside actors including Jude Law and Marion Cotillard

She appeared to has made a full recovery from her recent on-set injury, which saw her rushed to Dubrovnik hospital after slipping during filming.

Photos obtained by the Croatian press showed the star arriving at the city’s hospital in a black van while accompanied by a number of people.

Kate was checked by medics following the trip and was given the all-clear to head home.

A representative for the screen star told MailOnline: ‘Kate slipped and was taken to hospital as a precautionary measure required by the production.

‘She is fine and will be filming, as planned, this week.’

Hidden past: Lee (Pictured with Frederick Laws in 1950) buried the record of her remarkable life in boxes in the attic of her Sussex home - and they were not found until after her death by her son

Hidden past: Lee (Pictured with Frederick Laws in 1950) buried the record of her remarkable life in boxes in the attic of her Sussex home – and they were not found until after her death by her son

Kate was announced as the star of a new biopic about Vogue cover model-turned-war correspondent Lee Miller in 2020.

The film, called Lee, will follow the life and experiences of the photojournalist as she travels to the frontline of World War II and tries to expose the horrific truths of the Nazis.

Throughout her journey, she then comes to realise the truths of her own past – after she was a victim of rape when she was just seven years old.

In 1914, Lee had been sent to stay with family friends near New York while her mother, Florence, was ill in hospital. While there, she was raped and infected with gonorrhoea – apparently by a male friend or relative of the family she was staying with.

Later in her life, the New York fashion photographer went from appearing in American Vogue to witnessing first hand the horrors of Nazi Germany – becoming one of the most important photographers to record the 20th century.

Accident: The actress, who plays legendary American photojournalist Lee Miller (pictured) in the flick, was filming in the village of Kupari when she lost her footing

Accident: The actress, who plays legendary American photojournalist Lee Miller (pictured) in the flick, was filming in the village of Kupari when she lost her footing 

One of only two women combat photographers during World War II, she was also one of the few female correspondents who ventured into the liberated concentration camps.

WHO WAS PHOTOJOURNALIST LEE MILLER? 

Lee Miller went from appearing in American Vogue to witnessing first hand the horrors of Nazi Germany – becoming one of the most important photographers to record the 20th century.

Her talents were first put on full display in American Vogue during the 1920s when she became one of the country’s most sough-after models. 

Before the Second World War, she worked as a 20s cover girl and worked with surrealist artists in Europe before she embarked on a photojournalism career.

In 1929, when her modelling career hit controversy when her image was used in a menstrual pad advert, Miller went to Paris with the intention of apprenticing herself to the surrealist artist and photographer Man Ray. 

She honed her skills under the guidance of the great photographers of her day, including Man Ray, her became her lover during the early 1930s. 

She felt that photography was ‘ideally suited to women as a profession, for it seems to me that women are quicker and more adaptable than men. And I think they have an intuition that helps them understand personalities more quickly than men’. 

After a stint living in Cairo, she returned to Paris, where she met the British surrealist painter and curator Roland Penrose, who would go on to teach the use of camouflage on the Second World War. 

Living in Hampstead, north London with Penrose when the bombing of the city began, Miller decided to embark on a new career in photojournalism as the official war photographer for Vogue, documenting the Blitz.

Her work would later take her across the whole of Europe, working for the Allied forces and teaming up with fellow American photographer David E. Scherman, a correspondent for Life magazine.

One of only two women combat photographers during World War II, she was also one of the few female correspondents who ventured into the liberated concentration camps. 

Her collection includes incredible photos she took documenting the end of the war, traveled to France less than a month after D-Day and to record the Siege of the heavily fortified city of St. Malo.

She also witnessed the liberation of Paris, the Battle of Alsace, and the horrors of the first soldiers arriving at Nazi concentration camps at Buchenwald and Dachau.

And while visiting Germany, David Scherman took a photograph of Miller lying in the bathtub of Adolf Hitler’s apartment in Munich, with its shower hose looped in the center behind her head, resembling a noose.

The images became one of the most iconic of their partnership, and showed off her infamous modelling skills.

It is believed Miller had kept the address of Hitler’s apartment in her pocket ‘for years’, hoping to be one of the first to arrive during the invasion. After taking the bathtub picture, Miller took a bath in the tub and slept in Hitler’s bed.

After returning to the UK, Miller buried the record of her remarkable life in boxes in the attic of her Sussex home – and they were not found until after her death by her son, who was able to chronicle her achievements, according to the BBC.

She spent the later years of her life in England and died there in 1977, aged 70. 

 

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Before the Second World War, she worked as a 20s cover girl and worked with surrealist artists in Europe before she embarked on a photojournalism career.

She felt that photography was ‘ideally suited to women as a profession, for it seems to me that women are quicker and more adaptable than men. And I think they have an intuition that helps them understand personalities more quickly than men’.

In 1937, Picasso painted six portraits of Lee, including one in which she had a third eye.

After a stint living in Cairo, she returned to Paris, where she met the British surrealist painter and curator Roland Penrose, who would go on to teach the use of camouflage on the Second World War.

Living in Hampstead, north London with Penrose when the bombing of the city began, Miller decided to embark on a new career in photojournalism as the official war photographer for Vogue, documenting the Blitz.

Her work would later take her across the whole of Europe, working for the Allied forces and teaming up with fellow American photographer David E. Scherman, a correspondent for Life magazine.

Her collection includes incredible photos she took documenting the end of the war, traveled to France less than a month after D-Day and to record the Siege of the heavily fortified city of St. Malo.

She also witnessed the liberation of Paris, the Battle of Alsace, and the horrors of the first soldiers arriving at Nazi concentration camps at Buchenwald and Dachau.

And while visiting Germany, David Scherman took a photograph of Miller lying in the bathtub of Adolf Hitler’s apartment in Munich, with its shower hose looped in the center behind her head, resembling a noose.

The images became one of the most iconic of their partnership, and showed off her infamous modelling skills.

It is believed Miller had kept the address of Hitler’s apartment in her pocket ‘for years’, hoping to be one of the first to arrive during the invasion. After taking the bathtub picture, Miller took a bath in the tub and slept in Hitler’s bed.

Just hours before the iconic image of herself in Hitler’s bathroom, she had captured the horrors at Dachau.

Shortly after D-Day, she broke a rule against female correspondents going anywhere near the frontline, and followed Allied soldiers as they made their final assault on the Germans in the French town of St Malo – which saw her briefly arrested by the US Army.

After returning to the UK, Miller buried the record of her remarkable life in boxes in the attic of her Sussex home and rarely spoke about the war with her husband Roland or her son Antony Penrose.

The records of her wartime photographs were not found until after her death by her son Antony, who was able to chronicle her achievements and write a biography of his mother’s life.

Lee spent the later years of her life in England and died there in 1977, aged 70.

The film will be directed by Ellen Kuras, who was the cinematographer of Kate’s 2004 hit film Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, which also starred Jim Carrey.

It is adapted from the book The Lives of Lee Miller, written by Lee’s son, Antony Penrose.

Oscar-winning actress Kate, who is also producing the film, previously said of her role: ‘A woman I admire tremendously and whom I am so thrilled to be playing in this film. An extreme lover, thinker, life liver, cook, Vogue cover girl, war correspondent, icon, mother.’

Kate was fighting fit as she shot underwater scenes for her new role in the upcoming Avatar movie earlier this month.

The role involves her getting back in the water tank to shoot underwater scenes – after previously ending up with hypothermia.

Kate, who is best known for portraying Rose in Titanic, spent months in the water while filming the emotional 1997 movie and was left ill because of it.

But that hasn’t stopped the star from positively thriving in her new role in the Avatar sequel The Way Of Water.

The Oscar-winning actress plays Ronal – one of the underwater beings closely related to the Na’vi.

Producer Jon Landau was in London on Wednesday to screen some footage and (very gently) start to beat the drums to promote his new sci-fi blockbuster.

He told Daily Mail’s Alison Boshoff: ‘Kate broke a free-diving record among the cast. It was six minutes 50-something — but for Kate we agreed to call it seven. She was phenomenal.’

Kate was apparently particularly delighted to beat Tom Cruise, who famously performs his own stunts and managed a six-minute free dive while making Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation in 2015.

Young actress Bailey Bass who plays Ronal’s daughter Tsireya in The Way Of Water, said: ‘Kate holds the record — she set it during training. I managed six minutes and 30 seconds.’

All the cast went through dive training to prepare for the picture which is set over a decade after the events of the first film. 

Fame: Kate, who is best known for portraying Rose in Titanic, spent months in the water while filming the emotional 1997 movie and was left ill because of it

Fame: Kate, who is best known for portraying Rose in Titanic, spent months in the water while filming the emotional 1997 movie and was left ill because of it

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