Kentucky flooding: 2 people still missing as rescue efforts continue

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Gov. Andy Beshear said two people are still missing following catastrophic flooding in eastern Kentucky after state police announced that they had located one of three previously unaccounted for. 

The governor’s office said that the number is fluid and reflects only the reports made to the police. The death toll remains at 37, with rescue missions winding down. 

“Let’s continue to pray for our eastern Kentucky families affected by the flooding,” Beshear tweeted Thursday. “We will continue to be there for them in the days, weeks, months and years to come.”

KENTUCKY FLOOD LEAVES RESIDENTS SEARCHING FOR DRINKING WATER

Owlet County was added to the list of impacted areas approved for individual assistance by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

The counties currently approved include Breathitt, Clay, Floyd, Knott, Letcher, Owsley, Perry and Pike.

“Let me address something – there are a lot of rumors out there about who qualifies for FEMA or who can apply,” Beshear said in a statement. “Everyone who has been significantly impacted by the flooding in the eight counties approved for Individual Assistance needs to apply for FEMA. It’s a requirement for our travel trailers and it will be a requirement for other programs. Please apply.”

Hundreds of residents have been displaced by the flooding, with many now staying in Kentucky state parks, travel trailers and Red Cross and emergency shelters.

LIGHTNING STRIKE OUTSIDE WHITE HOUSE SENDS 4 TO HOSPITAL IN CRITICAL CONDITION

The number of customers without power in the state was down to 2,405, according to PowerOutage.US. 

More than 13,590 service connections were without water – a number that had also fallen – and more than 41,000 service connections were under boil water advisories. 

Three wastewater systems were non-operational and 13 were under limited operation.

The National Guard has rushed to distribute water and food. 

Rescue efforts have been complicated by rising heat and humidity

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Cooling centers were open in impacted counties with temperatures between 95 and 100 degrees. 

Heavy rain is back in the forecast for the Kentucky area and across portions of the Ohio and Tennessee valleys, where flood watches and warnings remain active. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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