Lawyers are advertising deportation-busting services to illegal migrants in prisons


Immigration lawyers are advertising their deportation-busting services to illegal migrants in prisons and detention centres 

  • Law firms are using prison magazines to advertise deportation-busting services 
  • They even go so far as to take out adverts in Albanian on how to claim asylum
  • Others offer services in modern slavery cases and injunctions against removal 

Immigration lawyers are using magazines in prisons and detention centres to advertise their deportation-busting services to illegal migrants.

Inside Time, the prison publication which has a print circulation of 50,000-a-month, even featured an advert in Albanian that offered consultations on claiming asylum.

Part of the advert, taken out by the London-based firm Lexmark Legal, reads: ‘If anyone has an asylum or modern slavery case under way, we urge you to contact us and we will give you the necessary consultation for your proceedings.

‘Here you win the right of being safe in the United Kingdom, the right to work after one year and then stay in the system which avoids possible deportation or arrest and being sent to a detention centre.’

Unscrupulous law firms are using prison magazines to advertise their deportation-busting services to the prison population, even going so far as to take out adverts in Albanian

Unscrupulous law firms are using prison magazines to advertise their deportation-busting services to the prison population, even going so far as to take out adverts in Albanian

Other firms advertising in Inside Time include Peer and Co, which offers services relating to ‘deportations’ and ‘detention and release’, and Queens Court Law, which promotes its work in deportation appeals, modern slavery cases and injunctions against removal.

Commenting on the adverts, Conservative MP Peter Bone, who previously chaired a parliamentary group on human trafficking, said: ‘I have nothing but contempt for the lawyers who do this. 

‘Many of these people would not have suffered modern day slavery. It’s just a way of keeping them here.’

Lexmark Legal said its advert was aimed at Albanian victims of trafficking and it did not assist violent, sexual or persistent offenders. 

Queens Court Law and Peer and Co did not respond to requests for comment.

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